News

Memorial picks up supportObstacles like a well remain.

"Establishing an internment memorial at the Taylor Avenue road end has the support of city officials. But including the road itself, from Eagle Harbor Drive down to the water, remains in question.Right now, a well that supplies water to Rockaway Beach sits squarely at the end of the pavement, enclosed in a brick building surrounded by a chain-link fence.Abandoning the well and drilling a new one is expensive, and might not be practical, Mayor Dwight Sutton said. But it might be possible to drop the whole thing below surface level, or to the point that it is less visible. We're trying to figure out what kind of engineering needs to be done. "

  • Mar 31, 2001

Frank talk by ferry friends

"This space has hurled its share of brickbats at those officials who we have elected when we think they have not served us well.Today we bestow a bouquet on three islanders we didn't elect, but who have done this community great service.The laurels go to Forrest Six, Kirk Robinson and especially to Alice Tawresey, members and the chair, respectively, of the Tariff Policy Committee that recommends ferry fares. "

  • Mar 31, 2001

Public input sought on Ericksen/HildebrandOpponents are wasting no time organizing.

"The public will get its first chance Tuesday to comment on the proposed connection of Ericksen Avenue and Hildebrand Lane.And the comments are expected to be numerous and heated, because the issue appears to be a flash point in the ongoing debate about growth and change on the island.This is the first step toward installing a freeway between High School Road and the waterfront, said Sheila Crofut, who has drafted an objection on behalf of Friends of the Ravine. "

  • Mar 31, 2001

Moratorium set on wetlands projects

The Bainbridge city council Wednesday imposed a moratorium on filing building-permit applications that seek to include any wetlands or buffers in their density calculations.The moratorium takes effect April 6.

  • Mar 31, 2001

The drug-free gardenGreenery guru Ann Lovejoy wants you to just say no to lawn chemicals.

"Ann Lovejoy wants to get island gardens off drugs. Ann Lovejoy's Organic Garden Design Book, from which she reads at Eagle Harbor Books on April 5, helps readers design easy-to-care-for and ecologically sound gardens without chemicals. Tackling such subjects as cooperation, not control and making beautiful dirt, Lovejoy espouses her belief there are organic alternatives - simple, natural ways to garden.I've been saying the same basic things for 20 years. I would talk about compost and manure, and people would get antsy, Lovejoy said. The book is total common sense - which is in itself radical. "

  • Mar 31, 2001

Vote delayed on ferry fare hikeA May change is still expected.

"Ferry fares did not go up Wednesday. But it appears only a matter of time until they do.The Washington State Transportation Commission postponed a final vote on proposed 20 percent-plus ferry fare increases, because the state Senate has not yet lifted the spending caps that limit increases to the rate of inflation.Commission members, though, left little doubt that they will impose the rate hike once the Senate acts.After all the work they have done, it would be hard to ignore the Tariff Policy Committee and say I can't support this, said commission member Chris Marr of Spokane. "

  • Mar 31, 2001

Tie-dyed friendshipA candid look at the color and joy of Nigeria.

"Jim Taylor bought batik fabric from an upbeat Yoruba woman, Nicky Davis, at Seattle's Folklife festival in 1972.It proved the start of a friendship reflected in a heartwarming photography exhibit opening at Pegasus March 31. The batik is beautiful, but it also has mystical and spiritual meanings I can't begin to grasp, Taylor said of the West African cloth design. I've maintained these close friendships, but I won't ever be able to understand, in entirety, the culture.Taylor purchased batik fabric at the 1972 Folklife; at the next year's event, he and Davis exchanged pleasantries. Over a decade of once-a-year interaction, the acquaintance deepened to friendship. Taylor became Davis' point of contact in Seattle, and in 1996 she invited Taylor to her Nigerian homeland, where she teaches crafts at a school in the town of Osogbo, near Africa's west coast.Taylor spent five weeks in Osogbo. "

  • Mar 28, 2001

Dump cleanup set for JuneGroups are already lining up to make use of the property.

"Today's dump could be tomorrow's park. But first comes the removal of yesterday's garbage. And that is expected to begin in June, with excavation of 120,000 cubic yards of material - one-third of which will be trucked away for disposal elsewhere - at the Vincent Road landfill.Cost of the cleanup is expected to hit $2 million, to be split between the county and city. "

  • Mar 28, 2001

An internment memorial is sought on Taylor Avenue.

"The appropriate way to memorialize the forced removal of the island's Japanese-Americans during World War II is to re-create the long walk they took down to Eagle Harbor, and onto the boat that carried them away.That's the view of a committee working on a memorial to those events.The group will ask the city council tonight to set aside all of Taylor Avenue from Eagle Harbor Drive down to the water for the memorial.I think it's a tremendous idea. It's part of history, said Paul Ohtaki, who was 17 years old in 1942, when he and his family were forced to leave the island and were sent to concentration camps by executive order of the federal government. "

  • Mar 28, 2001

Do you feel less crowded this week?

"So was it a boom or wasn't it?Do you have any more elbow room today, knowing that Bainbridge Island's population is a tad over 20,000, rather than the 23,000 or more some had predicted?We confess to being somewhat taken aback by the results of the 2000 census, doing a double- and triple-take when we saw the numbers over the weekend. "

  • Mar 28, 2001

Barrel of monksA lightheartedcrew of Tibetans will share insights and the artof the mandala.

"In a meditation on beauty and the transience of life, Tibetan Buddhist monks will create a complex but temporary artwork at the Bainbridge Public Library. The mandala, an intricately patterned circle of colored sand, will be started March 27, and take four days to complete.We chose this mandala, called Cheneriz, as a manifestation of the Buddha of Compassion, said Venerable Lobsang Wangchuk, among the delegation of monks. The mandala master has made these for 20 years. He is an excellent, a fantastic artist. "

  • Mar 24, 2001

“Nakata, Cleven favored for camp”

Nakata Park? Camp Cleven? An iconic island family and a longtime scoutmaster head the list of honorees being considered for a renamed Camp Hopkins.

  • Mar 24, 2001

Honor some real heroes

"We're still not sure just what credentials put the Major in Major M.J. Hopkins. Some recall him to be a veteran of the Canadian or British military and the first Great War; others tell us he served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, armed not with a rifle but a slide rule.However he earned his rank, by the time World War II rolled around, the retired Major Hopkins wore ignorance on his lapel right next to his bars, as part of a cabal that tried to keep Bainbridge Island's Japanese-Americans from returning here after wartime internment. "

  • Mar 24, 2001

“Lights out! (Or at least, lights down)Astronomers want new standards to curb light pollution on the island.”

"Believing it's better to shield a single candle than to curse the brightness, members of the Battle Point Astronomical Association are campaigning against light pollution.Not that they're advocating getting around by lantern-glow. What they do want is light directed at the area to be illuminated, rather than light that disperses to the neighbors and the heavens.There are an awful lot of dollars spent on an awful lot of power to produce an awful lot of lumens that people neither need nor want, said Mac Gardiner of the BPAA. "

  • Mar 24, 2001

“Toward new, rich stories”

"In 1942, as many members of a small island community were taken from their homes by order of the federal government, a lone newspaper editor stood up and said, This is wrong. These are our neighbors, and they belong here among us.It's a story that grows richer with each telling, and contributes more than any other to Bainbridge Island's sense of place. And we suspect the life of Walt Woodward - whose passing we will mourn at memorial services this weekend - is the sort of tale that Scott Russell Sanders would applaud. "

  • Mar 21, 2001

New life in the old CoveCollectibles and gifts are the fare at the revamped Lynwood store.

"Like the collectible items in her store, Nancy Brennan decided that a Lynwood Center gift shop was worth keeping.So when Peddler's Cove closed last October, Brennan bought the store and inventory, and re-opened it in November as Pleasant Cove.I've always loved this store, Brennan said. And the response has been really positive. People have said they are so glad that it was kept open. "

  • Mar 21, 2001

SAM curator brings love of artA four-talk series will share the wealth of the museum.

"In 18th century America, the equivalent of today's family photo album was the formal portrait. In the early 19th century, large-scale landscape paintings brought the Western wilderness to city dwellers with all the impact of big-screen special effects on today's audiences. Painting is the visual history of who we were as Americans, and what we are about now, said Ann Barwick, president of the Seattle Art Museum's Council of American Arts. That's why we can't ignore it. "

  • Mar 21, 2001

“Liveaboards in, anchors outA new harbor plan calls for the use of buoys by boat dwellers.”

"The Bainbridge Island Harbor Commission is once again weighing anchor on an effort to bring order to the quasi-chaos that is Eagle Harbor.The groups believes its plan preserves historic uses, including use by the liveaboard community.And this time around, the state may support it, a reversal of its previous opposition to the presence of liveaboards.Our policy now is that if environmental standards can be maintained, it's up to the local community to decide if it wants liveaboards, said Mark Mauren, Shoreline District Manager for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.The city has already decided that issue. The comprehensive plan refers to anchor-out living as an important element of affordable housing and island diversity, and the city has tried to support that community.Even so, the often haphazard location of liveaboards has been a confounding issue in attempts to regulate and manage harbor use.There has not been a well-defined anchorage plan, said Mayor Dwight Sutton. They've set their hooks pretty much where they wished. "

  • Mar 21, 2001

Fund for French exchange honors Katie Horst

"When Katie Horst died last year, her parents knew what she would have wanted - they have dedicated a fund to help Bainbridge exchange students go to France.Katie said that her trip to France was the happiest time of her life, said Sandra Horst, her mother. As a mom, I was so scared to let my daughter go to Europe without me, but I am so thankful that this made her so happy.Horst died last September at age 19, after suffering head injuries in a car accident. While she was in the hospital, friends set up a fund for her family, to help them through what they believed would be the long haul of her recovery. Those funds now will go to the exchange scholarship, while a flowering dogwood tree will be planted in a quiet ceremony this week at Battle Point Park, on a hill overlooking the pond and soccer fields on which Horst played. "

  • Mar 21, 2001

“Census numbers to bring falloutThe effects will be political and financial, officials say.”

"By the end of the month - possibly even by the end of the week - the Census Bureau will disclose how many of us it counted as of April 1, 2000.The city's population figure, a matter of considerable debate, will trigger a broad range of consequences. "

  • Mar 21, 2001