News

Leave minor league ball plan on bench

"Pennant fever - we've got it.And after watching our Seattle Mariners take three of four from the hated Bronx Bombers over the weekend - on the hostile turf of Yankee Stadium, no less - we've got one word for the non-believers:October.Indeed, with the race for the World Series in full, glorious swing, how can you say enough about baseball? Despite the crazy escalation of player salaries, periodic labor strife, and the occasional bad-apple idiot like John Rocker, baseball unites the nation's sports fans like nothing else, a peerless amalgam of power and grace, real time held in lazy suspension for nine innings of play, the quintessential American pastime...But our thoughts here are occasioned less by the Mariners' solid output than the upcoming work of the new Kitsap County Public Facilities District, which gets under way early next month. The seven-member PFD board, empaneled by county commissioners earlier this year, will look at public recreation needs around the county and propose a list of projects for development with public funds.And amongst the specific proposals to be considered will be a new ballpark facility, of sufficient scale and class to bring a minor league baseball franchise to Kitsap County. "

  • Aug 9, 2000

Bonker bids for secretary of state

"Don Bonker wants to keep the Washington Secretary of State's office in island hands.And the former seven-term congressman says he is more qualified than any of the other 10 aspirants who want to succeed Bainbridge Island's Ralph Munro, who is retiring after 20 years in the office. The secretary of state's most important formal duty, Bonker says, is overseeing state elections, and he had on-the-job training as Clark County auditor, where he oversaw local elections. The secretary's most important informal job is as a trade ambassador, and Bonker says he learned that aspect of the job as former chairman of the House Foreign Relations Committee.I think my credentials really stand out, the Democratic candidate said. I think I have more experience and maturity than anyone else who has ever served as secretary of state. "

  • Aug 9, 2000

Rhoades pedals east

"It's payback time for Bainbridge Island cyclist Steve Rhoades.He's leaving Saturday morning for a cross-country bike marathon to Washington, D.C. And his objective is to raise $100,000 for the social-service agencies that rescued him from a life of homelessness and substance abuse.I want to give back to all the charities that helped me, Rhoades said. "

  • Aug 9, 2000

Development at home with open space

"If you want a look at the Bainbridge of tomorrow, check out North Town Woods, a new development north of New Brooklyn Avenue and east of Sportsman Club Road.Lots are small - 6,000 to 7,000 square feet. Of necessity, homes are close together.This is the outgrowth of changed platting requirements that favor clustered development, developer Jim Laughlin said. We have groups of neighborhoods with no cul de sacs. The neighborhoods are separated by open space, and every house backs up to open space. "

  • Aug 9, 2000

Churches turn focus to island youths

"Hoping to reach out to young people in their congregation and in the community, two Bainbridge churches have added new staff to focus on youths and their families.Dan Holland has joined the staff at Rolling Bay Presbyterian Church as director of youth missions and ministries, while Julie Honig-Smith has come to St. Barnabas Episcopal Church as associate rector, with a focus on youth work."

  • Aug 5, 2000

Audit alleges overbilling

"A city secretary was fired last year for alleged irregularities in invoices for work done earlier under a personal services contract. The irregularities were disclosed in an audit of the city books for the 1998 fiscal year, released by the state Auditor's Office last week.But whether or not the woman - then under contract as a secretary for the Civil Service Commission, and later hired briefly as a part-time secretary in the mayor's office - was paid more than $22,000 for work not performed remains in dispute."

  • Aug 5, 2000

Charter government for Kitsap?

"Convinced that Kitsap County government is obsolete, a diverse citizen's group is asking voters for permission to start a remodel.And there is a surprising degree of agreement on what a new county government ought to look like, even among the incumbent office-holders.With the breadth of issues we face, three commissioners are not enough, said Kitsap County Commissioner Chris Endresen of Poulsbo, who represents the north end of the county and Bainbridge Island. And I think an executive and legislative branch with real separation of powers would lead to better decision-making.A group calling itself the Home Rule Committee has gathered enough signatures to put the issue of a home-rule charter for Kitsap County on the Nov. 7 general ballot.Voters will also see a slate of freeholders on that ballot. If the charter petition passes, the elected freeholders will draft a new charter for county government - essentially a local constitution - which in turn would be submitted to the voters for approval."

  • Aug 5, 2000

“Relay for life, and for love”

"For many readers out there, it's always a lot more than just another calendar listing. This year, as we look ahead to the American Cancer Society Relay For Life on Aug. 11-12, that someone is us - and we ask for your generosity and help.This week, the editor of this newspaper learned that his mother has breast cancer, and faces a mastectomy. It is, as any family that has been touched by the scourge of cancer can attest, a time of great uncertainty and no small amount of fear. We can hear her now, reading this commentary when the Review arrives in her mailbox in Oregon next week, and her inevitable exclamation of chagrin - Oh, heavens! - irked that we're making mention of it. But we do so not out of any thought of public sympathy, but rather to remind readers of the suddenness with which cancer can strike, how close to home - and that many in our island community are doing what they can to battle the disease."

  • Aug 2, 2000

Swimming program dropped

"A popular activity for elementary school students will be dropped from the calendar this coming school year.The swimming program, which has been part of elementary curriculum for the past 25 years, will be terminated this fall due to changes in scheduling. School District Superintendent Steve Rowley announced last week that the swimming module will be discontinued, as it no longer fits into the time frame of the school year."

  • Aug 2, 2000

Catering to island coneheads

"Elizabeth Kelsey is the first to admit that she's a little nuts about fruit.This is my obsession, my baby, she says about the fruit-based ice cream she sells from her tiny store-front on Bjune Drive below Eagle Harbor Books, next to Lindsley's and Bainbridge Auto Parts.Kelsey's All-Natural Ice Cream, as the store is called, is a misnomer. There's no cream or any other dairy product involved. Only organically grown fruit."

  • Aug 2, 2000

“What fate, historic mill building?”

"Craig Snyder didn't want to see part of Bainbridge Island's history lost to the wrecking ball.So last winter, to alert users and passersby, Snyder placed a series of mock eviction notices inside the old concrete building at Blakely Harbor Park, announcing its condemnation.It's always been thought of as kind of a nuisance (because of vandalism), said Snyder, an island public-art advocate who works for a hi-tech firm in Seattle. But it brings up the whole issue of what to do with these old remnants.Once you get inside (the building) and see some of the views the openings frame, it's really amazing, he said."

  • Aug 2, 2000

What is that awful smell?

"In Murden Cove, summertime fills the senses. It inspires the squawks of herons and shrieks of eagles, it ushers away winter clouds to reveal Mt. Ranier towering in the distance. And across tidal flats on gentle breezes, it sends an obnoxious, putrescent stench.Other places on Bainbridge Island can stink, said Brandi Hunt, who lives near the cove, but they don't stink like this does.On torrid, cloudless days at a low tide, the smell begins. It starts on the mud flats and the silt-covered banks of the Murden Cove stream and it rises in feculent wafts upwards, past Hunt's house on Moran Road.On the worst days it even reaches the highway, where drivers turning from 305 onto Sportsman Club Road shrivel their noses, roll up their windows and step on the gas."

  • Jul 29, 2000

Numbers only tell part of the story

"We can imagine standing in line for a latte, sometime in the year 2014, and overhearing a few of the locals still arguing:...And another thing - we never did get to vote on that damn city hall. What was it again? $12 million? $19 million?...Ah, Bainbridge, may it never change. And despite the release of final numbers from the city administration this week, the question of how much the new city facility cost - officially, $7.72 million for the building and grounds, $8.54 million if you factor in a few related improvements - we think there's still more to the story."

  • Jul 29, 2000

Circus of the arts

"This summer, director Steven Fogell decided to introduce something different to the high school students at Bainbridge Performing Arts.What he created was an entirely original production called Circus Dell 'Arte, based on the commedia dell'arte that mixes elements of music, dance, puppetry and movement into a physical dialogue.Everything is done through visual image and sound, said Fogell. Its more of a theatrical event than a play.Two showings of the performance will take place on Aug. 4 at 4:30 and 7 p.m. at the BPA Playhouse."

  • Jul 29, 2000

Taking aim at speeding drivers

"The sign says 25 mph.Spend the morning watching traffic on Grow Avenue, though, and you might wonder.That guy on the motorcycle is a regular, says Dave Corn, as a biker roars past at 45 mph. Sometimes he'll come around the corner and just whale on it.It's 6:45 a.m. on a Thursday, and Corn and neighbor Bob Conoley are holed up in a van kitted out for comfort, in the driveway of the Grow Village condominiums. Their mission: surveillance.Drivers, they say, like to speed on their street, to the point that they and other residents feel unsafe. To prove their point, they have borrowed a radar gun from Bainbridge Police and set up shop."

  • Jul 26, 2000

Calming starts behind the wheel

"There may, in the end, be nothing like the power of the ticket book to give drivers a little more respect for neighborhood speed limits.An example from earlier this month comes to mind:Irked by heavy dumptruck traffic roaring in and out of the Blakely Harbor/Fort Ward area, a West Blakely resident called police and asked if they'd swing through for a look. By coincidence, a patrol officer was already in the area on other matters. In the hour that followed, three truck drivers were cited for speeding, enforcement that was followed by a letter from police to the trucking company, asking them to slow their employees down.The next day, a neighbor reported following a dumptruck from Blakely Harbor to the highway. Its speed: slooowwww..."

  • Jul 26, 2000

Zoltan the sultan of business

"Once he is finished explaining how his name is pronounced, Zoltan Szigethy will explain his hopes for the Kitsap Regional Economic Development Council.I hope I can expand the diversity of employment, said Bainbridge Island resident Szigethy, who was appointed the EDC's new executive director last week.The Kitsap Regional EDC is a non-profit organization that looks to bring bigger and better business into Kitsap County. Bainbridge Island resident Kevin Dwyer, the EDC's director of business recruiting and marketing, said the EDC's mission boils down to bringing new dollars into the market.We want to recruit and maintain primary businesses, Dwyer said. The companies don't have to be headquartered in Kitsap County, but we want people working for them here.EDC president Karl Jonietz said Szigethy has the right balance of business sense and community devotion that he and the other board members looked for in their search, which brought candidates from all over the nation."

  • Jul 26, 2000

“Schools, parks mull Grand land swap”

"Plans for new public schools next to the Grand Forest have inspired controversy. They may also have generated a solution.Although it has not been formally addressed, local officials are discussing a land swap of the future school site off Mandus Olsen Road with a park district-owned section of the Grand Forest off Miller Road. If the parks department is willing, and the school board is in agreement, the schools and the parks will make a trade, Bainbridge Island School Board President Bruce Weiland said this week. And I think it could be a very good solution to this issue."

  • Jul 22, 2000

City lands grant for pedestrian/ bike plan

"The news was good, and the timing wasn't too bad either.Just as a morning-long seminar on pedestrian and bicycle issues wound down at city hall Thursday, planners learned that the city had landed a $35,000 state grant for a non-motorized transportation plan.This is going to be a fun one, said Marti Stave, senior planner for the city, who applied for the grant earlier this year.The non-motorized plan will bridge what Stave calls a big gap in the island's transportation planning, long on policies for roads but arguably short on ideas for modes of transportation that don't involve four tires and a gas tank."

  • Jul 22, 2000

Townhouses for Sakai Village

"First it was a retirement village.Then it was apartments.Now even the name has changed, and Sakai Village - formerly the Village at Sakai Lakes - will be all townhouse condominiums, developer Doug Nelson says.I've been trying to do everything I can to make everybody happy, said Nelson Friday, smarting from what he described as hate mail generated by his previous development proposal.I decided I've got to do something (different) here, he said. I'm turning into a real bad guy with the public."

  • Jul 22, 2000