News

Let’s find a better way to plan our city

In principle, we find the continuing battles over Ericksen Avenue deplorable. After no fewer than 11 public forums last year, the City Council approved a design that attempted to balance the neighbors’ desires to preserve the old-timey feel of the street against the needs of walkers and cyclists, who find the street’s narrow, shoulder-less contours nearly unusable.

  • Mar 13, 2002
Dr. Bruce Nitsche is a primary care doctor who is returning to the “old ways.”

Doctors dare to be different

You walk into the doctor’s office, and the receptionist greets you by name, and offers you coffee or hot chocolate. The magazines are current, but you don’t have time to begin reading them, because the doctor is waiting for you.

  • Mar 9, 2002
Dr. Bruce Nitsche is a primary care doctor who is returning to the “old ways.”

Parks levy to head to voters in May

The Parks and Recreation District hopes that, for its funding levy, the second time’s a charm. It needs to be: if voters fail to approve the biannual maintenance and operation levy that funds the Park District by the end of the year, the district will run out of money.

  • Mar 9, 2002

School district to float facilities bond

The Bainbridge school district is taking pencil and paper to matters of hammer and nail. At issue: When in the 2002-03 time-frame should the board ask voters for money to finance capital-facilities construction and maintenance, and how much money should it seek.

  • Mar 9, 2002

It’s time for legislators to do their jobs

As the clock ticks down towards the March 14 wind-up of this year’s legislative session, the House and Senate are staring each other down on the transportation package.

  • Mar 9, 2002
Woodworker David Kotz designed

Where there’s a wood there’s a way, proves craftsman David Kotz

Technology is balanced by the human touch at Puget Sound Environmental Learning Center. Hand-made furniture and architectural detailing by craftspersons like woodworker David Kotz bring a warmth and intimacy to the buildings that are often tall and angled to accommodate the exterior solar panels.

  • Mar 9, 2002
Woodworker David Kotz designed
Volunteer Bruce Ziebart cleans graffiti from the Winslow Hardware facade.

Vandals strike local business

Graffiti made an unwelcome appearance downtown Wednesday when Winslow Hardware and Mercantile was defaced. The front and side of the hardware store – an island institution for fifty years – was hit late Tuesday night or early Wednesday morning with spray paint on the west and south sides of the building. Several planter boxes had been pushed from the overhanging facade on the building’s front.

  • Mar 9, 2002
Volunteer Bruce Ziebart cleans graffiti from the Winslow Hardware facade.

Receiver Lists HMC/Znetix Assets

Like the $74 million that Bainbridge Island-based HMC and Znetix raised from investors, the additional $17 million later raised by related entities called Cascade Pointe has also disappeared, according to a preliminary inventory filed in Seattle federal court by the court-appointed receiver. All told, receiver Michael Grassmueck can only locate $67,00 cash in the various entities founded and controlled by Kevin L. Lawrence of Bainbridge Island. Lawrence and the various entities have been named as defendants in a civil suit filed by the federal Securities and Exchange Commission in what state regulators have called “the biggest home-grown securities fraud in Washington history.”

  • Mar 8, 2002
Felomina “Fely” Salanga was diagnosed with leukemia last September. The Filipino American Community of Bainbridge Island and vicinity will hold a ‘fabulous fundraiser’ Mar. 9 to help with Salanga’s medical expenses.

Friendship is the best medicine

The centerpiece of Felomina “Fely” Salanga’s Island Center living room is an arrangement of figures as bright and cheerful as the smiling Salanga herself. Two carved water buffalo prance before a low table covered with flowers that surround the tiny, painted figures of the Virgin and Christ child like a forest. The flowers make a multi-colored carpet for the large statue wearing red satin and a straw hat – Santo Nino, the childrens’ saint.

  • Mar 6, 2002
Felomina “Fely” Salanga was diagnosed with leukemia last September. The Filipino American Community of Bainbridge Island and vicinity will hold a ‘fabulous fundraiser’ Mar. 9 to help with Salanga’s medical expenses.
Music historian and EMP CEO Robert Santelli reads from his book 'American Roots Music' Mar. 10.

The roots of the matter

The book Bainbridge music historian Robert Santelli reads March 10, “American Roots Music,” is a map of the tributaries – the blues, bluegrass, folk, country and more – that conjoin to form this country’s popular music. It’s a map Santelli helped chart.

  • Mar 6, 2002
Music historian and EMP CEO Robert Santelli reads from his book 'American Roots Music' Mar. 10.

BI cyclists and walkers unite

Bainbridge Island’s bicycle advocates want their wheels to be rolling, not spinning. Having twice developed island-wide plans for bicycle mobility that have gathered dust on the shelf, they want the new non-motorized transportation plan not only to be approved, but to be incorporated into the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

  • Mar 6, 2002

Island hit by rash of residential burglaries

Island homes have suffered a rash of residential burglaries in recent weeks, Bainbridge police say. “Earlier this year there was a lot of talk about someone getting into homes, and driving a white Cadillac,” said Bainbridge police Officer Steve Cain. “The same thing is happening again.”

  • Mar 6, 2002

Non-motor plan may be too detailed

As reported elsewhere in this issue, the City Council is about to tackle the non-motorized transportation plan, and will consider, among other things, whether to incorporate that document into the Comprehensive Plan.

  • Mar 6, 2002

Nature nurtured

If Seattle had a family photo album, Mary Randlett’s artwork could fill those pages. In nearly seven decades of picture-taking, Randlett has captured the natural beauty of Puget Sound and chronicled Seattle’s architecture and artists.

  • Mar 2, 2002

Re-Doogal’s gets go-ahead

Saying that the proposed “Re-Doogals” mixed-use project will be better for the environment than the existing parking lot, hearing examiner Robin Baker upheld the city’s go-ahead for that development.

  • Mar 2, 2002
Long-time Blakely Harbor resident Robert Smith rows his boat under one of the four existing docks in the harbor. The Planning Commission voted unanimously against two new private docks

Permission to dock denied

Saying that the community values a relatively pristine Blakely Harbor, the Planning Commission Thursday unanimously recommended against two applications to build the first new docks in some 25 years. One of the applications – from Kim and Sue Bottles of Seaborn Road on the north side of the harbor – received significant support from the neighbors, and had been recommended for approval by planning staff. But the commissioners believed broader issues were at stake.

  • Mar 2, 2002
Long-time Blakely Harbor resident Robert Smith rows his boat under one of the four existing docks in the harbor. The Planning Commission voted unanimously against two new private docks

Local gym remains shuttered

The receiver says he wants to reopen the Madison Avenue health club. But he can’t say when that might happen, nor can he say when he might have more definite information.

  • Mar 2, 2002

Wyckoff appraisal remains under wraps

The “magic number” that may determine the fate of the Wyckoff Superfund site and the city’s hopes to acquire it remains a secret, as appraiser Anthony Gibbons declined to make his conclusions public at a meeting with the Wyckoff Acquisition Task Force Thursday.

  • Mar 2, 2002

Real victims from chasers of rainbows

As this space has previously noted, those who invested their money in the HMC/Znetix fiasco are not the most sympathetic lot in the world. Without the benefit of prospectus, financial records, earnings history or any tangible assets, they sunk many millions of dollars – as much as $91 million, according to federal investigators – into a pipe dream.

  • Mar 2, 2002

To err and to forgive is human

When it comes to forgiving – and being forgiven – there’s no time like the present, David Chard says. Chard has designated April 7 “World Forgiveness Day 2002” to help others experience forgiveness. And, Chard wants to enlist people to plan events on a grassroots level he hopes will ripple outward. “Some people want to put it off to ‘someday,’” Chard said, “but there’s no ‘someday’ on the calendar. Things can happen that we don’t expect. That day may not come.”

  • Mar 2, 2002