House passes bill to expand court-ordered gun confiscation | 2020 Legislative Session

OLYMPIA – Courts could be one step closer to ordering people subject to vulnerable adult protection orders to surrender their firearms after the House voted 55 to 42 on Friday, Feb. 14 in favor of a bill that expands authority to do so.

House Bill 2305 would allow courts issuing a Vulnerable Adult Protection Order to consider whether a person named as an abuser should surrender their firearms, or concealed carry license.

“This bill gives judges the same tools they have for other protection orders to order the surrender of firearms if there is evidence that the subject of the order has used or threatened to use a firearm,” said the bill’s prime sponsor, Beth Doglio, D-Olympia.

Currently, the court can order the surrender of firearms from people subject to other kinds of protection and restraining orders, including domestic violence and stalking, but not for those issued to protect vulnerable adults.

In a House Civil Rights & Judiciary Committee hearing for the bill, Rep. Morgan Irwin, R-Enumclaw, asked if the bill brought forth any pre-emptive protections that did not already exist. Irwin raised the point that firearm surrender orders require previous evidence of threat and that this policy change would not provide legal protections additional to the court protection orders that already exist.

Vulnerable adult protection orders are typically issued for individuals over 60 years of age who are deemed by the court to be unfit to take care of themselves, are legally incapacitated, or have developmental disabilities.

A vulnerable adult who is suffering from abandonment, abuse, financial exploitation, or neglect may petition the superior court for a protection order, or an interested person acting on their behalf may also seek a protection order for them.

If the bill moves through the Senate and is signed into law, individuals possessing firearms in violation of the court order could be subject to an unlawful possession of a firearm charge in the second degree.

Matthew Aimonetti, representative of the Pink Pistols gun and LGBTQ rights advocacy group, testified to the House Civil Rights & Judiciary Committee in opposition to the bill. Aimonetti claimed the legislation lacked due process and had the potential to be used maliciously against people.

Aimonetti said the bill denies Second Amendment rights to individuals without criminal charges being filed or being convicted of a crime.

Cameron Sheppard is a reporter with the WNPA News Service.

More in News

Washington is making progress, but state officials urge residents to not let their guard down

Washington officials are cautiously optimistic about the flattening of the curve of… Continue reading

Only one new COVID-19 case found in Kitsap County

The number of newly confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has… Continue reading

Interest still lacking in council appointment

Don’t everyone jump up at once. Bainbridge Island City Hall has yet… Continue reading

COVID-19 may come back to Kitsap in future waves, health officer warns

Though there are strong signs that social distancing and other preventative measures… Continue reading

Bainbridge resident tests positive for COVID-19

Another resident of Bainbridge Island has been infected with the 2019 novel… Continue reading

COVID-19 worse in other areas on Kitsap than Bainbridge, based on population

Bainbridge Island is no longer the per-capita epicenter of the spread of… Continue reading

Bainbridge endures: Hopeful voices rise amid the challenge

Grounded for life. That’s what it feels like for some folks as… Continue reading

1.2 million students won’t return to classrooms anytime soon

OLYMPIA — Washington students will not return to classrooms this school year,… Continue reading

Gov. Inslee orders all Washington schools closed for the rest of the school year

Gov. Jay Inslee has closed all public and private K–12 schools in… Continue reading

Most Read