Senate and house dispute kills data privacy bill | 2020 Legislative Session

OLYMPIA – Groundbreaking data privacy legislation designed to give consumers more access and control over their own digital data died on Thursday, even though it had been passed in both the House and Senate.

That’s because the two chambers couldn’t agree on how the proposed law should be enforced.

Senate Bill 6281, sponsored by Sen. Rueven Carlyle, D-Seattle, would allow consumers to access, correct and even delete their own personal data possessed by large-scale data collecting companies like Facebook or Microsoft. The bill would even allow individuals to opt out of targeted ads.

Under the original Senate version, the attorney general was given authority to enforce the law on behalf of consumers. However, the amended house version would allow private parties to enforce the law, potentially creating a flood of lawsuits.

The bill passed in the Senate by a 46 to 1 vote on Feb. 14 and then went to before the House, which amended the bill then passed it in a 56 to 41 vote on March 6.

But the Senate balked when the bill returned to that chamber this week for concurrence with the House amendments and sent it back to the House with instructions to remove the amendments.

Then the House wouldn’t budge and on Tuesday, the House insisted on the inclusion of the amendments. So a committee made up of members from both chambers were in conference trying to come to an agreement on methods of enforcement for the data privacy policy.

Carlyle announced Thursday that the two chambers of the Legislature were unable to reach agreement on a single version of the bill by the end of the 2020 Legislative Session, citing via written statement that the impasse is related to questions surrounding enforcement.

“I continue to believe that strong attorney general enforcement to identify patterns of abuse among companies and industries is the most responsible policy and a more effective model than the House proposal to allow direct individual legal action against companies,” said Carlyle in his written statement.

Cameron Sheppard is a reporter with the WNPA News Service.

More in News

Kitsap Phase 3 application placed on hold until July 9

Kitsap County’s application to move on to phase 3 of Gov. Jay… Continue reading

Blossom appointed to planning commission after heated city council debate

In a question of process or progress, the debate over which quickly… Continue reading

Photo courtesy of the Bainbridge Island School District | Construction began on the new Captain Johnson Blakely Elementary, in March 2018.
Final change order approved for Blakely Elementary replacement project

Project budget total slated for nearly $45 million

11 new COVID-19 cases reported by health district Tuesday

Countywide total currently sits at 235

Blood donors needed as northwest faces shortages

It’s not unusual for blood to be in short supply in the… Continue reading

WSF advises riders limit usage to ‘essential purposes’

Washington State Ferries recently advised all riders to limit travel on ferries… Continue reading

224 cases of COVID-19 confirmed in Kitsap County

June sees the highest number of cases added since March

Law enforcement agencies state they cannot detain, cite or arrest violators of mask order

Both agencies cite Gov. Inslee’s statewide mask mandate as a “public health and safety measure.”

BISD superintendent provides update on potential in-person instruction

District aims to have final plan in place by end of July

Most Read