Nick Twietmeyer | The Bainbridge Island Review Casey Shortbull works to build the deck of one of the new cabins at Fay Bainbridge Park.

Cabins at Fay Bainbridge Park nearly complete

Two cabins made from reclaimed wood are well on their way to being completed at Fay Bainbridge Park.

And a bigger cabin is on its way.

The Bainbridge Island Metropolitan Park &Recreation District went green for the project, too. Much of the material used to construct the cabins was reclaimed from Williams-Olson Park’s caretaker building after it was recently demolished in order to make space at the park.

Park Services Director Dan Hamlin said that the cabins would offer another dimension for campers to enjoy the park.

“They’re essentially set up for a family to rent and have a little more structure around them,” Hamlin said. “We’ll do some selective pruning to create some better views… a filtered view of the water.”

Hamlin also pointed to the cabins as a solution for the seasonal flooding along the park’s waterfront, which limits the number of campsites that visitors can use throughout the year.

“This park is heavily used year-round. We have the seasonal issues down at the bottom, but these [cabins] will be open year-round,” Hamlin said.

Amenities inside the cabins include power and light fixtures, a set of bunk beds, a double bed, a deck and room for a tent outside. There will not be any plumbing connected to the cabins, although a standalone bathroom will be constructed nearby.

Terry Lande, the executive director of the Bainbridge park district, said the district was originally looking at building a series of yurts at the location but later officials agreed that in this climate, the yurts would be susceptible to mold buildup. It was also decided that building brand-new cabins would be too costly.

In making the decision to reuse the Pan Abode wood from Williams-Olson Park, Lande pointed to the ease with which the material can be used.

“It’s kind of a tinker-toy; you buy them and you just hook them together. So we just took it apart,” he said. “Luckily, we have very talented people on the staff to do that.”

The first two cabins are expected to be finished and open to visitors by the end of September with a third, larger cabin expected to be completed in the summer of 2018.

Park officials say that visitors to Fay Bainbridge Park who wish to rent one of the single-family cabins can expect to pay between $90 and $110 a night.

 

Nick Twietmeyer | The Bainbridge Island Review One of two cabins at Fay Bainbridge Park that are set to be completed by the end of August.