Tear it out and start anew

"The clinical term would probably be cathartic. To those charged with demolishing the inside of the future Marge Williams Center Friday morning, one could probably get by with something less stuffy - perhaps fun.This is pretty cool, said Ty Evans, catching a breather next to an overflowing dumpster in the building's driveway. It's a great way to release stress on a Friday afternoon.Evans was one of a 15-person work crew, mostly comprised of Windermere Real Estate employees volunteering for community service, who got the Williams Center project under way at long last. "

  • Saturday, October 21, 2000 2:00pm
  • News

“The clinical term would probably be cathartic. To those charged with demolishing the inside of the future Marge Williams Center Friday morning, one could probably get by with something less stuffy – perhaps fun.This is pretty cool, said Ty Evans, catching a breather next to an overflowing dumpster in the building’s driveway. It’s a great way to release stress on a Friday afternoon.Evans was one of a 15-person work crew, mostly comprised of Windermere Real Estate employees volunteering for community service, who got the Williams Center project under way at long last. Power tools roared inside, sledge hammers swung, dust flew, and pile after pile of debris was carted out the front door or sailed down from the second-story balcony. The material easily filled a 30-cubic-yard garbage tote donated by Bainbridge Disposal.Others went to work on a garden area in front of the Winslow Way building, tearing out old weeds and turning over the earth for new plantings. Renovation of the building, purchased from the estate of slain community leader Marge Williams, will create a center for local non-profit organizations.Approximately $400,000 has been raised, toward a goal of $420,000. First tenants will be the Bainbridge Island Land Trust, the Health, Housing and Human Services Council, and three other service groups.The center will also serve as a clearinghouse for countless other non-profits.What’s next?Crews from Drury Construction will replace the building’s roof and begin work on the facade. New windows and doors will be installed, to give the building a weather-tight shell as interior work continues into the rainy months.The office spaces will be repartitioned, to set up offices for the tenants and a central conference area for others.More volunteers and construction materials are needed.Down said a list will be posted in the front window, to keep islanders apprised of need and opportunity.My phone’s been off the hook, Down said. People are really behind this. “

More in News

Some blood donations could help COVID patients

Plasma from whole blood donations made through the American Red Cross that… Continue reading

Initial claims flat in Kitsap, state begins paying LWA benefits

Initial unemployment claims remained flat through the end of the week of… Continue reading

BI council set to extend building moratorium, but in a smaller area

The Bainbridge Island City Council approved a six-month extension of the development… Continue reading

Heat-lamp fire kills 25 chicks

Officials urge caution, seek alternatives

Stop sign now a yield sign for bicyclists

A new law aimed at making intersections safer for people riding bicycles… Continue reading

Families drive through to pick up materials, meals in BI

Lines of cars wrapped around Sonoji Sakai Intermediate School Friday as families… Continue reading

State economy gains jobs in August

The Evergreen State’s economy had another positive month of job gains and… Continue reading

Contract tracing effective in reducing COVID-19 spread, KPHD says

Contact tracing is triggered when a person tests positive for COVID-19

Pumpkin Walk not scared away by COVID pandemic

COVID-19 isn’t scaring away this Bainbridge Island tradition as the 27th Annual… Continue reading

Most Read