News

South-end sewer plan out for reviewBut the city has yet to reach an agreement for service.

"Extension of sewer service to several south-end neighborhoods is under way, at least formally, with the official release of a consultant's service plan.Under state law, we have to have a general sewer plan before we can begin any work on the ground, city manager Lynn Nordby said. The release of the report gets us to the point where public process starts, including city council hearings. The plan, which had been circulated in draft form last spring, would guide the extension of service to Emerald Heights, Rockaway Beach, upper portions of Pleasant Beach and Point White, where widespread septic-system failures have been reported. Blakely Elementary School could also be connected. "

  • Dec 6, 2000

At home in Oriental exoticaDomicile brings Tibet to Bainbridge.

"Geographically, Seattle is closer to the Orient than any other major American city. That closeness manifests itself in the Northwest's affinity for Oriental decor.People here are trying to create a Northwestern look by combining Asian and craftsman styles, says designer Jerry Carlin. Or they will mix very contemporary pottery with Chinese accent pieces.To cater to this affinity, Carlin and Keith Edgar have opened Domicile, a combination antique store and interior design service in Lundgren Station, immediately north of the Magnolia shoe store. "

  • Dec 6, 2000

In land we trustA Murden Cove parcel is the latest to be preserved by easement.

"Typical of the occasion, the most honored guests didn't hold invitations.As hosts Vince and Kay Mattson and members of the Bainbridge Island Land Trust tilted champagne flutes, a heron sat perched high in a tree overhead, while scores of birds rippled the waters of Murden Cove with a mad flapping.This happens every time we have one of these, said land trust president Steph Miller, of the tendency for wildlife to make an appearance at the dedication of Bainbridge parks and greenways.This occasion, observed on a brisk Sunday afternoon in late November, marked dedication of the Mattsons' property on Murden Cove as private open space protected from future development. "

  • Dec 6, 2000

Fate of ferries rests with OlympiaProposals to save the system were finalized Monday.

"The state ferry system does not hold a favored place in line for legislative funding.So warned, the Joint Task Force on Ferries Monday recommended a package of measures aimed at preserving at least the present level of service for the next decade.The Blue Ribbon Transportation Committee Report last week said we need to find $60 billion in new money for transportation, said Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen (D-Camano Island), co-chair of the Task Force and chair of the Senate Transportation Committee.That's a staggering amount, and it does not include any money for new ferry service, she said, cautioning the group to be modest in its recommendations. "

  • Dec 6, 2000

“Judge blocks I-722Round 1 goes to the city, which got an injunction in superior court.”

"City officials are breathing easier, after a judge's decision that blocks the tax-slashing Initiative 722 from taking effect while the courts consider its constitutionality.Thurston County Judge Christine Pomeroy agreed that the city of Bainbridge Island would be irreparably harmed if it had to comply with the various provisions of the initiative immediately, and entered an injunction Thursday blocking the voter-passed initiative until a final court decision. "

  • Dec 2, 2000

Hefty jump in ferry fares proposedThe goal is to recover 80 percent of operating costs at the ticket booth.

"Saying ferry users must be a visible part of the solution to the transportation-funding crisis, a state commission is calling for substantial fare increases over the next six years.In a report issued this week, the Tariff Policy Committee of the state's Transportation Commission recommends boosting the round-trip passenger fare on the Bainbridge, Bremerton and Kingston runs from the present $3.70 to $6.50 by 2006, and the car-and-driver fare from the current $6.50 to $12. During the peak summer season, the car-and-driver fare would go from the present $8.25 to $15.The price of a 10-ride passenger coupon book would go from the present $26 to $46.25 under the proposal.The premise is that users should pay 80 percent of ferry operating costs by 2007, up from the present 65 percent. "

  • Dec 2, 2000

“Where have all the students gone?School district enrollment is in free fall, adding to the budget crunch.”

"It's the case of the disappearing students.Bainbridge Island School District enrollment - already 55 students below projections for September, and down 62 in October - is down another 11 in November, according to the district business office.The cumulative enrollment drop - 73 full-time equivalent students below projections for the year - represents nearly 2 percent of the district's 3,800 students, said Mike Schroeder, director of business operations.Schroeder reported the latest enrollment drop at Thursday's school board meeting.We are 10 or 11 further off than that which we've allowed for in the adjusted budget - we have to hope that there isn't going to be much more, Schroeder said, But this year, all bets are off. We're already beyond anything typical or historical or predictable. "

  • Dec 2, 2000

Four vie for park vacancyThe appointee will fill out the term for a year.

"Four candidates have emerged in the search to fill the vacant seat on the Bainbridge Island Park and Recreation District's board of directors.The four seated commissioners - Ken DeWitt, Chris Llewellyn, Daryle Schei and Dave Shorett - may convene a special public session to interview candidates Eric Hoyte, Dane Spencer, Kjell Stoknes and Frank Stowell - before the board's next scheduled meeting on Dec. 14. "

  • Nov 29, 2000

Growth plan going under microscopeThe planning commission will dissect the successes and failures.

"Citizens are generally satisfied with the island's comprehensive planning policies, but not with what they actually see happening.And while part of the problem may be real, a big part is public perception, Bainbridge Planning Commission Evelyn Klinckmann believes.I think people don't always understand the consequences of policies, said Klinckmann, on the threshold of the first review of the comprehensive plan. As a matter of public education, we need to present them with really clear scenarios. "

  • Nov 29, 2000

BEST choice for an evening on the town

"Your kids could be slumped down in their desks at school, snoring through yet another period of rote book learnin'. Or they could be in Doug Olsen's science class at Sakai Intermediate School, using a Martian colony simulator - complete with working solar panel - to study the energy requirements for successful colonization of another planet.That they have access to the latter - purchase price, with all its mind-expanding possibilities: $1,600 - is a tribute to the efforts of the Bainbridge Education Support Team, better known as BEST. "

  • Nov 29, 2000

Fast service at Internet cafe

"Gary Chambers had it all. A successful Internet business. A home office. The ability to set his own schedule and answer to no one.But he got lonesome.And that led to a new business - Creative Internet Center.This is a European-style Internet cafe - a gathering place where people can come and meet, use a computer, drink coffee and socialize, said Chambers.The business, which Chambers owns with wife Tricia Borgardt, is located at 578 Winslow Way East, the porch next to Bainbridge Coffee. The cafe has six computers, three of them equipped with cameras for teleconferencing. Several of the computers have 3-D capabilities for dedicated video gamers.Hours will be Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., with a shut-down for lunch from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. "

  • Nov 29, 2000

Cooper makes Fed. Way final fourCity officials are exploring ways to keep the chief on Bainbridge.

"City officials, anxious to keep Police Chief Bill Cooper on Bainbridge Island as he pursues the same post in Federal Way, went so far as to explore the possibility of using city funds to purchase Cooper's house in Olympia.That, and other economic incentives explored by city officials, however, were abandoned as either unconstitutional or in violation of state laws, city Administrator Lynn Nordby said this week.We're continuing to investigate the things we can do, but we've got to be careful, Nordby said. "

  • Nov 25, 2000

Fire department eyes I-722Capital projects would be imperiled if the tax-relief measure is upheld.

"If tax-cutting Initiative 722 goes into effect this year while its constitutionality is being challenged, the Bainbridge Island Fire District is in good shape to absorb the revenue loss.But if the measure is upheld, the district will need to find new sources of revenue for its capital program. "

  • Nov 25, 2000

“Books bound for African villageOrdway students, Rotary join a Ugandan school project”

"Students in Amukarat, Uganda, don't have pencils or paper - using their fingers to write their assignments in the dirt.So Peter Emau, a Uganda native and Bainbridge resident, has island students helping the African village that lacks school supplies, books and printed literature. It is just so exciting, Emau said of the project, which will see a series of educational booklets sent to Uganda. It keeps on expanding.Emau, a research scientist at the University of Washington, knew that essential educational tools are absent in the village schools of Amukarat. The project began when Emau's brother, Gabriel Emau, a 30-year veteran teacher in Amukarat, asked Emau to print up his teaching notes so that his students could have something tangible they could learn from. "

  • Nov 25, 2000

“Crossing guard wanted, againParents are frustrated, as no one wants the job.”

"The hours are short, and the pay beats minimum wage by a couple of bucks an hour. It even comes with a free flag.But takers are few - zero, actually - for the job of afternoon school-crossing guard at the High School Road/ Madison Avenue intersection, leaving parents concerned once again for the safety of young students after school.We've been frustrated by that, said Ordway Elementary School Principal Bruce Colley, of the paucity of interest in the job. We haven't given up hope, by the way, he added. Anyone who wants to pick up roughly a half-hour's employment...Come on down! "

  • Nov 25, 2000

Just where in the world is Winslow?

"Editor's note: This is the first story in an intermittent series examining the city's comprehensive plan.* * * * *Putting half the island's future growth in Winslow underpins Bainbridge Island's Comprehensive Plan. Certainly, that directive fuels much of the public debate about development.But that apparently simple idea can confuse more than clarify - not everyone agrees on where Winslow actually is, a question that some say was never really settled during the comprehensive planning process. "

  • Nov 22, 2000

Might be time for a new standard

"Where's Winslow?With our five-year review of the Bainbridge Island Comprehensive Plan now under way - and, predicated as that plan is on Winslow being the hub of future growth - we thought some definition of terms might be useful.After all, underpinning the whole comp-planning project has been the notion of putting 50 percent of future development in the Winslow area. As we found out, there has been some disagreement about the boundaries of our little urban growth area (within the larger, official UGA of incorporated Bainbridge), with hopes and perceptions varying. Our findings are relayed on page A1 of this issue. "

  • Nov 22, 2000

Luxury living for seniors comes to town

"A new island development envisions the comforts of home, the amenities of a hotel and the security of instant medical services in one package.That's the concept behind the Meridian on Bainbridge Island, a mixed-use development planned for the north side of Knechtel Way , between the Helpline House grounds to the west and the dentist office to the east, along Ericksen Avenue.The Meridian will have 15,000-square feet of medical office space - almost twice the size of the Virginia Mason Winslow Clinic - on the ground floor, and 18 condominiums on the second and third floors. The residences will be age-restricted, requiring at least one occupant to be 55 or older. Residents will have concierge service, a town car and on-site catering available.The prices reflect the level of amenities. "

  • Nov 22, 2000

BHS gets top marks in annual school guide

"We're Number Four!That statement may not make for a rousing high school cheer, but it's a pretty proud proclamation of Bainbridge High School's place in the pantheon of central Puget Sound secondary schools.BHS ranks fourth among 66 public high schools in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties in two key prestige categories - reputation ranking and first-year University of Washington student grades - as compiled in the Seattle Times School Guide, an annual comprehensive guide to regional homes of secondary learning published this week. "

  • Nov 22, 2000

What do you get out of the second floor?

"You could say they put the bureau in bureaucracy.That's because the city's executive and finance departments exist in a nebulous area of public service in which, for the average citizen, not much readily apparent is done.Storm drains overflow in your neighborhood? Call public works. Building permit take too long? Gripe about the planning department. Get a speeding ticket? Hate the cops.But what do taxpayers get for their buck from the second floor of city hall? "

  • Nov 22, 2000