News

New townhome project proposedThe plan would cluster 56 units on High School Road East.

"The homebuilder who created the Weaver Creek subdivision in Winslow wants to build 56 homes on the 10-acre Martin-Patterson tract on the northwest corner of Ferncliff Drive and High School Road.By clustering the units on the west side of the tract, away from Ferncliff, he hopes to defuse the kind of neighborhood opposition faced by the Woodland Village project farther north on Ferncliff. "

  • Sep 19, 2001

Dawn of uncertain timesA search for explosives put the Wenatchee out of action Monday.

"On the newsstands, the morning headlines put Americans under the shadow of war.That cloud passed directly over Bainbridge Island on Tuesday, as fear of terrorism took the ferry Wenatchee out of action for four hours during an exhaustive search for explosives.Law enforcement officials were called after the vessel made its 8:40 a.m. departure from Seattle.Crew members - who are under strict instruction to report anything out of the ordinary - reported hearing an inexplicable metal on metal sound below the engineering decks, with the noise thought to be coming from outside the hull, Washington State Ferries spokesperson Susan Harris-Huether said.The crew heard the sound just before the vessel left Colman Dock, but didn't connect it with a possible threat until they were under way, Harris-Huether said.They just heard it the one time, like someone had attached an incendiary device or something, she said. That was their concern. "

  • Sep 19, 2001

Middle East peace: Is there a chance?A scholar offers his insights as part of the library lecture series.

If you wonder if peace has a future in the Middle East, Joel Migdal can offer more than a casual answer. We know that it is going to take the establishment of a Palestinian state, and the withdrawal of Israel from 95 or 96 percent of the Gaza strip, said Migdal, who will lecture on the subject next month as part of the Bainbridge Library Speakers Forum, and some compensation to the Palestinians for the 4 percent they don't withdraw from.Migdal brings a lifetime of scholarship to the question.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Review honored

The Bainbridge Review earned first place General Excellence honors in the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association contest for 2001.The award was announced at the WNPA's annual convention, held in Tacoma over the weekend.The Review topped 22 peer newspapers around the state with circulation of 5,001 to 9,000. Judges cited the paper's front-page design; news coverage that was attentive to community diversity; and the strongest editorials among entries judged - local and pointed.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Healing music for the darkest of timesThe concert will benefit a local academy.

Carol Willis Buechler might have gathered this group of friends to make music, even if she hadn't wished to raise money for her son's school.The benefit for West Sound Academy, scheduled for Sept. 22, is for Buechler a lark.The musicians are my friends, Buechler said, but they're all consummate professionals, too. We live what we do, and it's a lot of fun to make music with them.The musicians, who will play and sing a true cross-section of classical works ranging from Samuel Barber to Johann Sebastian Bach, are remarkably intertwined.Mary Foster Grant and Elizabeth Grant are sisters who have been playing and singing together all their lives.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Sure ShotPete Saloutos is hailed as a photographic legend.

"The athletes that Pete Saloutos photographs - the subjects of the work that recently made him a Nikon Legend Behind the Lens - have nothing on him, when it comes to energy and drive.Saloutos begins his day with a 4 a.m. gym workout, and gets to his computer by 6:45 - after a pit stop at Blackbird Bakery. For every one of me, there are thousands of photographers who fell by the wayside, Saloutos says. My strength is persistence.And perfectionism.To get a single shot of a row of swimmers diving from a pool's edge, Saloutos first spent six hours lighting each swimmer with her own light. A photograph of a cowboy herding sheep on a mountain crest took Saloutos six months to coordinate. "

  • Sep 15, 2001

Water access is a public obligation

Forty-five miles of shoreline. One public dock.That's the score on Bainbridge Island, for anyone who wants to maintain a small vessel but isn't blessed with the money to afford a waterfront home or a yacht club membership. (There are, by our count, two public ramps for motor launches and kayaks; but you can't really count Point White dock, which is more of a pier.) Certainly, the desirability of docks for recreation is as strong as ever, as evidenced by plans for several new structures across our waterways by private homeowners on Blakely Harbor.

  • Sep 15, 2001

Community responds to national tragedyServices and memorials spring up around town.

With the rest of the country, Bainbridge Islanders remembered the victims of this week's terrorist attacks with memorials on Friday. Noon services were held at island churches, while mayor Dwight Sutton addressed a crowd of about 300 gathered on the green next to city hall. Calling the moment sobering and somber, Sutton enjoined the crowd to help eliminate terrorism while resolving to uphold justice. A few minutes ago, we pledged allegiance to those principles, Sutton said, following a flag salute. If we do not honor those principles, we do not honor the dead. While those gathered spontaneously broke into God Bless America, a young woman in dreadlocks quietly laid a bouquet of sunflowers on a concrete pillar behind the mayor.Bainbridge students coping with the week's events also sought ways to express sorrow, find solace and show solidarity with the bereaved.At Sakai Intermediate School, 1,280 paper cranes were hung on the wire edifice surrounding the Sakai sculpture.

  • Sep 15, 2001

“Sept. 11, 2001: Another day of infamyThe island boosts security after terrorist attacks shock the nation.”

"Drivers were turned away at the ferry terminal gate, the silent streets and holding area symbolic of the pall cast over Bainbridge Island after terrorist attacks against the nation Tuesday morning.Downtown, few cars or pedestrians were about, as islanders stayed near televisions and radios while details of the horror in New York, Washington D.C. and elsewhere unfolded. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

From grand visions, tiny landscapesIllustrating images with words.

Donald Frothingham's paintings at Bainbridge Arts and Crafts remind one that scale and size are not synonymous.While the reproductions of his abstract landscapes in Images from an Unknown suggest vast landscapes, the actual works are 20 by 30 inches and smaller. The size really had to do with working in a confined space, Frothingham said.

  • Sep 12, 2001

“Extra students please school officialsFirst-week enrollment surprised officials, and offered a budget windfall.”

"Sixty more students than school officials expected showed up for class this week. While district projections suggested that Bainbridge public school enrollment would decline by 28 students this year, to 3,782 full-time equivalent students, first-week totals turned out to be 3,847.The news leaves district officials pleased - if puzzled.We certainly didn't expect it, Deputy Superintendent Ken Crawford said. Even if our usual attrition rate of 20 students per year holds, the district will still have 44 students and $175,000 (in state funding) more than we thought. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

Sept. 11, 2001: Another day of infamyThe island boosts security after terrorist attacks shock the nation.

Drivers were turned away at the ferry terminal gate, the silent streets and holding area symbolic of the pall cast over Bainbridge Island after terrorist attacks against the nation Tuesday morning.Downtown, few cars or pedestrians were about, as islanders stayed near televisions and radios while details of the horror in New York, Washington D.C. and elsewhere unfolded.

  • Sep 12, 2001

“Ericksen plan to go before councilSidewalks are planned on both sides, but may wait as the street changes.”

"The Bainbridge City Council tonight will be shown an improvement plan for Ericksen Avenue designed to make the street more walkable and bikeable.And while the plan ultimately calls for sidewalks on both sides of the street, they may not be constructed any time soon in front of the historic houses on the east side of the street. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

When words fail, what have we left?

In the face of the unimaginable, we find our humble words of little consequence, and we presume to offer none today. The Bainbridge Island Review asks readers simply that as you turn to this page, please observe a moment of silence, reflection and prayer, for our nation and our world.

  • Sep 12, 2001

“From grand visions, tiny landscapesIllustrating images with words.”

"Donald Frothingham's paintings at Bainbridge Arts and Crafts remind one that scale and size are not synonymous.While the reproductions of his abstract landscapes in Images from an Unknown suggest vast landscapes, the actual works are 20 by 30 inches and smaller. The size really had to do with working in a confined space, Frothingham said. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

“Yesterday the world, today BainbridgeWell-traveled designer Bill McKnight opens his first retail outlet in Winslow.”

"You've probably seen Bill McKnight's interior design work.Maybe you haven't been to Singapore's storied Raffles Hotel recently to see the work McKnight has done on that symbol of Britain's empire, still consistently ranked as one of the world's best hotels. Or perhaps you haven't caught his work at the Delta Whistler Hotel in Canada, or the White Pine Lodge in Schweitzer, Idaho.But if you've been to REI's flagship store in Seattle, or to almost any Nordstrom, you've seen McKnight's style - one he's bringing to Bainbridge Island in the form of a home-furnishings retail outlet in the Pavilion. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

Ericksen plan to go before councilSidewalks are planned on both sides, but may wait as the street changes.

The Bainbridge City Council tonight will be shown an improvement plan for Ericksen Avenue designed to make the street more walkable and bikeable.And while the plan ultimately calls for sidewalks on both sides of the street, they may not be constructed any time soon in front of the historic houses on the east side of the street.

  • Sep 12, 2001

Extra students please school officialsFirst-week enrollment surprised officials, and offered a budget windfall.

Sixty more students than school officials expected showed up for class this week. While district projections suggested that Bainbridge public school enrollment would decline by 28 students this year, to 3,782 full-time equivalent students, first-week totals turned out to be 3,847.The news leaves district officials pleased - if puzzled.We certainly didn't expect it, Deputy Superintendent Ken Crawford said. Even if our usual attrition rate of 20 students per year holds, the district will still have 44 students and $175,000 (in state funding) more than we thought.

  • Sep 12, 2001

“When words fail, what have we left?”

"In the face of the unimaginable, we find our humble words of little consequence, and we presume to offer none today. The Bainbridge Island Review asks readers simply that as you turn to this page, please observe a moment of silence, reflection and prayer, for our nation and our world. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

Yesterday the world, today BainbridgeWell-traveled designer Bill McKnight opens his first retail outlet in Winslow.

You've probably seen Bill McKnight's interior design work.Maybe you haven't been to Singapore's storied Raffles Hotel recently to see the work McKnight has done on that symbol of Britain's empire, still consistently ranked as one of the world's best hotels. Or perhaps you haven't caught his work at the Delta Whistler Hotel in Canada, or the White Pine Lodge in Schweitzer, Idaho.But if you've been to REI's flagship store in Seattle, or to almost any Nordstrom, you've seen McKnight's style - one he's bringing to Bainbridge Island in the form of a home-furnishings retail outlet in the Pavilion.

  • Sep 12, 2001