News

‘This ferry ride was brought to you by…’

State ferries may become floating advertising kiosks to keep the boats afloat. But they won’t be floating billboards -- external advertising visible from the shores is not in the cards. “We are accepting information from companies, organizations and individuals about advertising, and asking for their best estimates on how much revenue some or all of their programs could raise,” said Washington State Ferries public affairs Director Pat Patterson.

  • Oct 31, 2001

BI businesses regroup

The bad news is that the economic fallout from the September terrorist attacks definitely reached Bainbridge Island. The good news is that for the most part, the effect seem to be dissipating. “There was literally nothing for a few days,” said Sally Loomis of Loomis Travel. “We were busy refunding and reaccomodating people.”

  • Oct 31, 2001

Chrisman hammers his music home

Simon Chrisman calls the hammer dulcimer he plays for the First Fridays audience Nov. 2 a “piano without the keys.” The description is apt. The dulcimer is like a piano without a lid – the strings running parallel to the sounding board, the felts controlled with a foot pedal – but the indirect action of the keys is short-circuited by putting the felt hammers in the musician’s hands.

  • Oct 31, 2001

Vote ‘Yes’ for open space

As a matter of law, Bainbridge Island is a city. As a matter of fact, though, much of it looks like countryside, with farms, fields and forests dominating much of the landscape outside of Winslow. But like every place else, the island is growing, and no matter how we plan our growth, some of it will inevitably push into those presently empty spaces.

  • Oct 31, 2001

Should this land be our land?

Call it the dream of fields. And woods. And perhaps a little shoreline as well. The desire to preserve the island’s natural features and farms underpins the $8 million open space bond levy that goes before voters Nov. 6. The campaign got an unexpected push last week, when the city came to terms with Akio Suyematsu for public purchase of his 15-acre working farm on Day Road East.

  • Oct 31, 2001

Every child deserves an education

Maggie Mackey still attends Bainbridge High School, even though she graduated last spring. Like other students with multiple disabilities, Maggie qualifies for public education until she is 21, under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. “In our house we call it ‘post-graduate work,’” said Sheri Ley-Mackey, Maggie’s mother.

  • Oct 31, 2001

Our picks

The Review’s endorsements for contested seats and ballot issues in the Nov. 6 general election:

  • Oct 31, 2001

Council candidates woo business support

Six candidates for the island’s three city council seats tried to persuade the island’s business community Thursday that they are better able to keep the wheels of island commerce turning. Each candidate answered three questions at the Chamber of Commerce’s monthly lunch meeting at the Commons.

  • Oct 27, 2001

Rest in pieces

The giant pumpkin in front of Johansson Clark and Associates is extra big this year. An orange monster appears in front of the realtors each Halloween, but this oversize squash tips the scales at 966 pounds – close to the world champion 1,200-pound colossus.

  • Oct 27, 2001

The next mayor of Bainbridge

Chris Llewellyn knows what it’s like to be poor on Bainbridge Island. “I was a single mother at one point,” she recalls, “and I was so poor that I had to sell my bed to buy a chainsaw to cut firewood to keep the house warm.” Llewellyn has shared a lot of experiences with a lot of people on the island where she has lived most of her life.

  • Oct 27, 2001

This pig flew, to Bainbridge

“Pigasus” may not be as graceful as her mythical near-namesake, but she has her feet on the ground. The prodigious pink porker – a 3-foot high, 100-pound fiberglass sculpture – landed on the northwest corner of Wyatt and Madison this week sporting running shoes, wings and a big grin.

  • Oct 27, 2001

Long on love, but in short supply

Driving up to the home of Suzanne and Cameron Fischer, one notices the bright plastic toys scattered across the green lawn. The interior of the house is neat – considering that six kids call it home. Three are the Fischers’ own and three are foster children. All are crammed onto the sofa to watch movies. “You can tell which are mine by the hair,” said Suzanne Fischer, indicating the three whose tousled mops are, like their mother’s, flaming red. The infant, toddler and 5-year-old who are the foster additions are otherwise indistinguishable from the Fischer kids.

  • Oct 24, 2001

Walkers find island’s back roads

The Great Island Friday walking group may not travel fast, but it goes the distance. “Power walkers drop us right away,” member Ron Williamson said. “We are a meandering group – we stop, we look. “We especially like small houses and mailboxes that are funky, the art that people have in their yards – the things that make this island what it is.” In four years of casual Friday rambles, TGIF has covered more than 700 miles of island trails, beaches and roadways.

  • Oct 24, 2001

Vancil, Llewellyn and Knobloch

Surveying the field of city council candidates on the Nov. 6 ballot, voters may ask: Whatever happened to the simple goal of public service? We wonder. Over the past few elections, we’ve watched council races veer into the politics of reaction against previous policies, decisions and trends. In 1997, the successful theme was “fiscal responsibility.” Two years later, candidacies were largely defined by skittishness over growth. We see this year’s races as an extension of the latter contests; among the six candidates, two are Ferncliff-area residents galvanized by controversial developments in their neighborhood (following the successful bid by Michael Pollock two years ago on the same theme).

  • Oct 24, 2001

City, Suyematsu come to terms

After three years of negotiations, the city has reached agreement with owner Akio Suyematsu for public purchase of his 15-acre farm on Day Road East, to preserve the land as open space.

  • Oct 24, 2001

Mysteries of the petroglyph

For amateur archaeoastronomer John Rudolph, the Bainbridge petroglyph is like a postcard from the past. Rudolph believes he can read the meaning of the carved stone that juts from a Bainbridge beach as if it were a message from ancient islanders. “The purpose of the site is to determine what time of year it is,” Rudolph says. “The petroglyph lies precisely west of the Skykomish canyon 60 miles away. On the vernal and autumnal equinox, one sees the rising sun shining straight through the canyon, if one is standing at the petroglyph.”

  • Oct 24, 2001

If you wire it, they will come

For a property manager, the loss of a major tenant in the middle of a less-than-robust market is a crisis. When the Day Road industrial park lost Watson Furniture Systems, Sheri Watson saw an opportunity. And by offering high-speed internet access, she has filled the vacant space and then some with what she believes will be the jobs of the future on Bainbridge.

  • Oct 24, 2001

What ‘they’ think of U.S.

Jonathan Miller-Lane loves a good question. “A really good subject can hook anyone,” Miller-Lane said. “You have to have a question that you yourself are truly interested in.” He poses one both pointed and timely when he asks a panel of Bainbridge youth and adults Oct. 24 how Americans perceive their national values – as opposed to what the rest of the world understands them to be.

  • Oct 20, 2001

Retirees: still doing good work

Few encounter Bainbridge nonprofit organizations without meeting the retired volunteers who contribute time and money to many of these organizations. And as more families need both parents in the workforce and have less time to give, retirees take up the slack.

  • Oct 20, 2001

Gray, Sivitz and Cencom deserve votes

If the number of candidates is any indication, the most sought-after elective position on Bainbridge is the fire commission seat that Alan Corner is vacating after two six-year terms. The race drew a total of four hopefuls.

  • Oct 20, 2001