News

Open Sesame!

Entering M.J. Linford’s studio is like stepping into a book – a rather unusual book. There are written fragments, like the cryptic list on a bulletin board: Stains on the soul; emotional geography; drowning in a sanican; stealing your child. There are also visual elements – jars of feathers, pencils, plastic boxes full of hand tools and iconic-looking artifacts of shells, wood and bone. Text and image merge in Linford’s world, because she is a book artist – joining written and visual arts in formats loosely defined as a “book.”

  • Jan 5, 2002

Hate-mail suspect tied to BI crimes

A Sammamish man arrested in Seattle for an anthrax hoax is also responsible for several anti-Semitic hate-crime mailings on Bainbridge Island, according to island police. The suspect, identified as 45-year-old Donald B. McAninch, may be responsible for hundreds of harassing letters in the Puget Sound area in recent years, police said.

  • Jan 5, 2002

There’s no place like a home

The two building lots on a Fort Ward hillside are impressive enough in their own right, covered with tall firs and madrona trees, offering sunny western exposures and filtered views of Port Orchard and the Olympics. For two Bainbridge Island single mothers, though, they are more than just prime real estate. They are spots where the women and their children can put down roots, and enjoy a sense of permanence that most of us take for granted.

  • Jan 5, 2002

Old ferries’ tales

It was the curiosity of ferry passengers that prompted Thomas Kilday Janus and Carolyn Neal to write about the big boats. When Janus worked at Waterfront Books near the Bremerton terminal, he fielded questions from a steady stream of ferry passengers looking for books about the transport.

  • Jan 2, 2002

Wyckoff property won’t be sold – yet

The new trustee of the Wyckoff cleanup site has agreed not to sell any of the land for at least a year, to give local and federal officials time to work on public acquisition.

  • Jan 2, 2002

No time to catch her breath

After a tough campaign to be elected mayor of Bainbridge Island, Darlene Kordonowy thought she would take a little time off to catch her breath. But once she was elected, she realized that she needed to spend all the time she had learning how to do the job.

  • Jan 2, 2002

Give some thought to the charter

Who cares what someone in Poulsbo thinks? Or Silverdale? Port Orchard? We should, and until further notice, we do. Elsewhere on this page, readers will find a selection of letters to the editor from our brethren (and “sistren”) from the peninsula, all commenting on the proposed Kitsap County charter.

  • Jan 2, 2002

BMA puts the ‘fun’ in fundraising

The ladies in red weren’t dancing that day, but they were certainly tapping their toes. For that matter, so were the ladies in green. As they gathered in a well-appointed Wing Point home for their December tea, the lively members of Bainbridge Music and Arts paid tribute to the season – and their long-standing commitment to the island’s young talent.

  • Jan 2, 2002

After eight years, it’s out to pasture

Before becoming mayor, Dwight Sutton knew that local government moves slowly. What he has learned during his four years at the city’s helm is that moving slowly generally leads to better decisions. “Every issue has more sides than are apparent,” he said. “The fact that the process takes time ensures that the outcome is more likely to be workable.”

  • Dec 29, 2001

Sutton leaves a legacy of quiet civility

During Mayor Dwight Sutton’s four-year term, the city of Bainbridge Island – the all-island version – has reached what could be thought of as young adulthood.

  • Dec 29, 2001

Tales of ‘old Bainbridge’ for the telling

Bainbridge’s general store, where men gathered near the pot-bellied stove, may have disappeared, but old guys still find places to pass the time. These days, they sit at the Rolling Bay Jiffy Mart, at Walt’s in Lynwood Center, or around Eddie Rollins’ desk at American Marine Bank on Winslow Way. Perhaps the most visible group can be found at the Town and Country coffee shop. “We hang out together because it’s a holdover from the days when we hunted in packs,” old-time islander Don Beemer says. “Women don’t pack up like men do. It goes back to when men hunted the mastodon.”

  • Dec 29, 2001

Island arts in full swing in 2001

2001 was a year of arts and humanities “firsts” on Bainbridge, as 13 programs and series debuted. Bainbridge youth benefited from several new arts initiatives and took their talent across the globe. And when global events were felt close to home, panel discussions and a lecture series opened conversation about America and Islam.

  • Dec 26, 2001

Reframe the debate on Net filtering

If educators set out to stock a school library, would they purchase a thousand books without regard for content, put them out for general student use, and review them for appropriateness after the fact? We believe the process is more thoughtful, more deliberate. Yet that is essentially the method we have chosen in providing student access to the Internet in our schools.

  • Dec 26, 2001

Words of wisdom, then out the door

Bainbridge Island’s three departing city council members believe their terms ended on a note of triumph – and its name was “roundabout.” Jim Llewellyn, Liz Murray and Merrill Robison all supported the concept of traffic circle at the busy intersection of High School Road and Madison Avenue.

  • Dec 26, 2001

Stylized study in color, light

The visitor to Ray Styles’ studio might be attracted to the bright colors of his art supplies, as well as to his work. The hundreds of sticks of compressed pigment in neat rows on a studio table are this self-styled Impressionist’s medium for the luminous pastel landscapes on view at Bistro Pleasant Beach.

  • Dec 26, 2001

In this world, fares are fair

Reality Number One: Washington State Ferries need more money to operate, and more money still to make capital improvements. Reality Number Two: The state doesn’t have the money, and there are a lot of other demands for any new transportation bucks, leading to... Reality Number Three: Fares have to go up.

  • Dec 22, 2001

Santa brings island a brand new pool

The long wait is over. After four failed levies dating back to 1993 and a successful fifth in 1999, the new, $5.5 million Don Nakata Memorial Pool made its “informal” debut Wednesday.

  • Dec 22, 2001

In the wake of Sept. 11, local dramatists look for enlightenment

In the wake of Sept. 11, Palestinian American Hanna Eady was left frightened and isolated in his Bainbridge home. “I was hiding because I was, like everyone, in shock,” Eady said. “But I was also a little scared. I knew what had happened here to the Japanese in World War II. And I come from a country where they can come to your house and pull you out without a reason.”

  • Dec 22, 2001

Angelic organ heard on high

Instead of shopping for Christmas gifts on her lunch hour, Rita Rowe walks from work down the street to Eagle Harbor Congregational Church. In the sanctuary, she lifts the instrument’s roll-top lid, pushes down two stops, inserts a computer card that cues a “Flemish bell” sound – and rolls the opening chords of “Joy to the World” in arpeggio.

  • Dec 22, 2001

Bigger fish gobbles up AT&T

Some rumors are true. Speculation that the island’s new cable television provider was itself about to be purchased by a rival outfit came true Wednesday, with the announced merger of AT&T Broadband and Pennsylvania-based Comcast.

  • Dec 22, 2001