News

Tough session ahead, local legislators say

On one side are commuters and business interests demanding fixes for the state’s transportation system. On the other, anti-tax fervor fanned by conservative talk-show hosts and initiative mongers.

  • Jan 16, 2002

Writer, historian Katy Warner dies at age 84

She grew up when the ferries went to Blakely Harbor, and bowlers practiced at a six-lane alley at Fort Ward. And having lived Bainbridge history, she chronicled it with a book that’s still in print. “Old Bainbridge” lost one of its most colorful figures Jan. 12, with the death of Katherine “Katy” Warner at Island Health and Rehabilitation Center. She was 84.

  • Jan 16, 2002

She helped, one kid at a time

If Connie Mueller received a “thank you” note from every young person she has helped over the past six years, she might be buried by a paper avalanche. Mueller retires as managing director of Bainbridge Youth Services this week.

  • Jan 16, 2002

An eternal flame of hope

The Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhist temple has reflective surfaces that make the well-lit space seem even brighter. Brocade cascades down five tiers of the altar like a metallic waterfall, while 1,000 gold and silver origami cranes circle, suspended on string. Across the altar’s highest tier, six golden bodhisattvas dance on massive tree trunks.

  • Jan 16, 2002

Fare hike gets first OK

The Tariff Policy Committee will “go public” with its recommendation to decrease ferry fares for daily commuters while increasing the fares for others, with public meetings in February and March.

  • Jan 16, 2002

Piloting in the Palm of your hand

Private pilot Chris Smith was sure he had grounds for complaint. After all, he’d come very close to dying. The checklist program on his Palm Pilot that was supposed to make flying an unfamiliar single-engine plane straightforward had made it a nightmare instead.

  • Jan 16, 2002

Council should go slow on major changes

The new city council’s first meeting this week reminded us a little of those fishing shows on cable television – you knew something was going on, but it was mostly below the surface.

  • Jan 12, 2002

BI history to take root in Winslow

History marches on, this time from Strawberry Hill into the heart of Winslow. Bainbridge Island Historical Society board members and city officials signed a lease agreement Tuesday, formalizing a plan to move the historical museum to Ericksen Avenue and the so-called “Three Tree Park.”

  • Jan 12, 2002

MLK Day celebration in song

Those who heard the “surround sound” performance by the 200-voice MLK Jr. Memorial Choir last year know that when director Patrinell Wright dubbed the event Sing Out!, she named the event well.

  • Jan 12, 2002

City council seeks to redefine role

The incoming Bainbridge Island city council wants to function as a free-standing legislature – an independent branch of city government. To do so, though, it wants things like office space, dedicated staff and equipment, all of which cost money.

  • Jan 12, 2002

Simple problem, radical solution?

In a debate that seemed unlikely to change many minds, opponents of the proposed Kitsap County charter argued Thursday night that the document is a prescription for bad government, while supporters claimed it is the county’s chance to free itself from the shackles of a uniform, century-old system.

  • Jan 12, 2002

What is art? At BAC, it’s elementary

Rainbow colors of several hundred artworks splash across Bainbridge Arts and Crafts walls this month. The biennial exhibit of elementary art gathers paintings, sculpture, prints and drawings from eight island public and private schools.

  • Jan 12, 2002

Satterwhite shows work at library

Dinah Satterwhite’s photographs, now on display at the library, bring the Northwest landscape indoors. Familiar scenes like the Grand Forest and the library’s Japanese garden have been transformed by her technique. Sometimes this involves hand-tinting the images; most recently, it has meant shooting with infrared film.

  • Jan 12, 2002

Thorne gets warm welcome

Mike Thorne should peel off his Pendleton sweater and try a Walla Walla sweet onion, to bond with politicians east of the mountains. That was one suggestion for the new director of Washington State Ferries, as he was introduced to public and press Monday afternoon at the Bremerton Transit Center.

  • Jan 9, 2002

Ferries have a boss, perhaps a champion

With ferry system employees and labor officials arrayed around the room, and the question of ferry system privatization before him, there was only one right answer. Mike Thorne found it.

  • Jan 9, 2002

Diversity shifts in wake of Sept. 11

Sept. 11 has reframed the national dialogue about diversity, Hubert G. Locke says. “Diversity has been a polite topic for about a decade, but 9-11 raised the discussion of diversity to a new level,” Locke said. “I think we are at the beginning of a whole different kind of diversity challenge.”

  • Jan 9, 2002

Is the charter really smarter?

To its backers, the proposed Kitsap County charter will make county government more responsive to the people, reduce costs and improve performance. To its opponents, the charter will exacerbate division within the county, increase costs and potentially paralyze government operations.

  • Jan 9, 2002

Scientist finds oceans of faith

When a personal crisis led Gary Lagerloef to reconsider spirituality, he had to reconcile his profession with his profession of faith. Lagerloef, an oceanographer, works for Earth and Space Research, a nonprofit research organization that conducts studies related to oceans and climate. He uses satellite data to study ocean currents and “El Nino.”

  • Jan 9, 2002

Aim effort at housing that more can buy

Events this week remind us once again that while Bainbridge needs more affordable housing,some homes that pass under that name are more affordable, and therefore more needed, than others.

  • Jan 5, 2002

VIP’s vision stresses support

Mary Lewis first noticed something wrong with her vision in 1989, when straight lines turned wavy. The visual anomaly turned out to be an early symptom of the most common eye disease affecting seniors – macular degeneration, a condition that attacks the retina’s center, making direct vision blurry while leaving some peripheral vision intact. When she received her diagnosis, Lewis was a 52-year-old archeology, history and classics professor at New Jersey’s Kean University.

  • Jan 5, 2002