News

Too hasty on moratorium

"When the city council imposed a moratorium on some shoreline development, including docks and bulkheads, it acted on the belief that the city had only a year to revise such regulations to conform to new state requirements. Five days later, the state Shoreline Hearings Board kicked the props out from under the whole plan, when it tossed out those same state requirements and told the Department of Ecology to rewrite them. By law, local jurisdictions have 24 months to bring their programs into conformity with new state requirements, and that law is what triggered the city's time-line. "

  • Sep 8, 2001

A long look at island shorelinesShould projects be put on hold while the city mullsnew regulations?

With a review of local shoreline regulations under way, and goaded by opponents of new docks in Blakely Harbor, the city has imposed an emergency moratorium on some waterfront development.The moratorium went into effect Sept. 3; the city council is expected to hold a public hearing in early October, at which time it could modify or repeal the measure.Planning officials say the move will give them time to consider new regulations being driven by state and federal agencies. We are in the process of developing new shoreline regulations, and are seeing an increase in permit applications, said Planning Director Stephanie Warren. We want to do that work without reviewing permits.

  • Sep 8, 2001

“State, feds driving shoreline review”

"The city moratorium on some shoreline development is driven principally by the requirement that the city update its 1996 shoreline plan and make it conform to new state rules by September 2002.But five days after the Bainbridge city council imposed its moratorium, the state Shoreline Hearings Board struck down the new state rules, calling into question both the time frame and the requirements that the city must meet. "

  • Sep 8, 2001

Math down, language upPreliminary WASL results are mixed for island students.

Math scores among elementary-age Bainbridge students are declining, while reading, writing and listening skills continue to climb.Those are the preliminary findings of the latest round of Washington Assessment of Student Learning testing.While preliminary, this data does invite attention to the area of mathematics, said Faith Chapel, new superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Bainbridge Island School District.Results from the WASLs and other tests will be analyzed during this year's K-12 mathematics program review, she said.

  • Sep 5, 2001

Prudence marks school budgetWith district enrollment stagnant, officials buckle down.

A conservative approach marks the 2001-2002 district budget adopted by the Bainbridge Island School Board last week. With expenditures only $260,000 below revenues, this is a very tight budget indeed, district financial officer Peggy Paige said. There is little room for unplanned expenditures.The district projects $26.412 million in revenue for the coming year, and $26.150 million in expenditures.

  • Sep 5, 2001

“Prudence marks school budgetWith district enrollment stagnant, officials buckle down.”

"A conservative approach marks the 2001-2002 district budget adopted by the Bainbridge Island School Board last week. With expenditures only $260,000 below revenues, this is a very tight budget indeed, district financial officer Peggy Paige said. There is little room for unplanned expenditures.The district projects $26.412 million in revenue for the coming year, and $26.150 million in expenditures. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

Fine choices in primary

"Mail-only primary ballots, which should appear in Bainbridge mailboxes this week, are abbreviated affairs, as only two city council races and the open seat on the fire commission attracted enough contenders to require a primary election. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

“Math down, language upPreliminary WASL results are mixed for island students.”

"Math scores among elementary-age Bainbridge students are declining, while reading, writing and listening skills continue to climb.Those are the preliminary findings of the latest round of Washington Assessment of Student Learning testing.While preliminary, this data does invite attention to the area of mathematics, said Faith Chapel, new superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Bainbridge Island School District.Results from the WASLs and other tests will be analyzed during this year's K-12 mathematics program review, she said. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

Dog Daze a way of giving back to Helpline House

Just saying thank you wasn't enough.Jillian Bateman sought a more tangible expression of gratitude to Helpline House, so she is producing the Dog Daze benefit concert, Sept. 9.I wanted to show them I appreciate what they've done, Bateman said. And I guess I do like organizing stuff.

  • Sep 5, 2001

Mastering the gift of making you giveFund-raiser extraordinaire Larry Mills is Bainbridge Citizen of the Year.

"Unlike most of us, Larry Mills doesn't mind asking other people for money.His willingness to undertake fund-raising projects has made him much in demand as a board member for organizations such as the Bainbridge Library, Bainbridge Performing Arts and the Bainbridge Foundation.For his charitable work on behalf of a variety of island causes, the Bainbridge Island Kiwanis Club has named Mills its 2001 Citizen of the Year. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

School zone safety gets a boostBetter signs and reduced speeds all day will complement tougher enforcement.

Better signs and high-profile police presence will promote safety in school zones this fall, advocates hope.A grant from the Washington State Traffic Safety Commission will fund overtime work and put extra patrol officers around schools for the next two weeks, Bainbridge Police Traffic Officer Rob Corn said. Police will use radar enforcement and a portable speed sign to show drivers how fast they're going.Also, the city's public works department will revise school zone speed limits to specify 20 mph from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for Blakely and Wilkes elementary schools during weekdays.

  • Sep 1, 2001

Interest strong among fire hopefulsVoters will narrow the field to two on the primary ballot.

"Continuing a recent trend of high interest in service on the Bainbridge Island Fire Board, four candidates go before voters in the Sept. 18.All vie for the single open seat on the three-person board, and two will advance to the November general ballot. In interviews with the Review this week, candidates discussed their qualifications and views on issues facing the department, including tax funding; collective bargaining with career fire personnel; maintaining the volunteer program; and developing facilities and equipment. "

  • Sep 1, 2001

Schools plan to beat construction

"The school bus hits the road Sept. 5, and the school district hopes students will be on board.Administrators say that increased bus ridership will lessen traffic tie-ups due to roundabout construction.We're encouraging everyone to ride to diminish traffic congestion and enhance students safety, deputy superintendent Ken Crawford said.Construction will begin between Sept. 10 and Oct. 1, according to city officials. The intersection of High School Road and Madison Avenue is slated to be closed to traffic for 21 days - but may be closed for longer, if inclement weather delays building. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

Residency put to rest

"We were pleased with Kitsap County Auditor Karen Flynn's decision last week declaring Bill Nelson to be a resident at his folks' Wing Point home, and thus eligible to run for office from Bainbridge Island's central ward.It's not that we necessarily favor Nelson - it's too early for us to make up our minds. But we like voters to have choices, and Nelson is a clear-cut alternative to neighborhood activist Bill Knobloch, whose neighbors challenged Nelson's residence, and youthful barista Houston Wade. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

“Sales strong, prices level offLocal agents call the dip in listing prices a return to normalcy.”

"After several quarters of steady increases, Bainbridge real estate prices dropped significantly in July.But according to local real-estate professionals, it's a return to normalcy.Prices have dropped, no question about it, said Judy Nieukirk of Prudential Northwest Real Estate on Bainbridge Island. I see price reductions coming in daily. But I think this is a leveling out, and a return to what we normally see on Bainbridge. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

Regulators up estimates of HMC issueThe company did not contest charges made by state securities officials.

"The state securities division has made permanent its order shutting down stock sales in Bainbridge-based Health Maintenance Centers, Inc., as neither HMC nor founder Kevin Lawrence contested allegations of improper conduct.And as the state's probe continues, state investigators say the number of investors and amount of money raised may be greater than first thought.This is the biggest case in my 20 years, said Deborah Bortner, Washington State Securities Administrator and department spokesperson. There is so much money and so many people involved. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

Guild takes over Pegasus series

"The songs go on, but the singer has new backup.Peter Hwosch takes up his guitar at Pegasus Coffeehouse Sept. 1, to sing about personal introspection and global activism, in a seven-year-old series now coordinated by the Island Music Teachers Guild.Since series creator Korum Bischoff is also a guild member, the transition in mid-August was smooth. It's something that I've always done for Pegasus, but now I'm getting more support from the guild, Bischoff said. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

Is county charter good for Bainbridge?Local freeholders are troubled by a provision that would curb the influence of island voters.

"Kitsap County's freeholders will show islanders the first draft of their proposed new county charter next week.But far from seeking support, Bainbridge's two freeholders see the meeting as an opportunity to make a show of force against a provision they say is bad for both the island and the county, and may in fact be aimed at diluting the island's influence on county government.We're better off with what we have now than with this new charter, said George McKinney, who joined Andy Maron on the 21-member board writing a new constitution for Kitsap County. "

  • Aug 25, 2001

Freeholders try to isolate Bainbridge

"A year ago in this space, as work got under way on a new Kitsap County charter, we expressed concern that some of the reformers would simply try to reform their way into power.Now, having drafted a charter that would drastically change the way county commissioners are elected, freeholder and Republican activist Matt Ryan confirms our suspicions, telling the Review in an interview this week that the plan created a higher probability of balance, meaning electing Republicans. "

  • Aug 25, 2001

On its last pilings?Legislators want to know how much life the Eagle Harbor ferry facility has left.

"Peel away the gleaming new aluminum siding on the main building at the Eagle Harbor ferry maintenance yard and you find the core of historic Bainbridge.The massive building - one of the biggest on the island - is the last remnant of the Hall Brothers shipyard, once among the world's largest. But how much useful life is left in the century-old building?That's the question a legislative committee will attempt to answer over the next year and a half. The facility needs major dollars to upgrade it, modernize it and put safety facilities in place, said Rep. Beverly Woods, (R-Poulsbo), one of the committee members.Before spending that money, we want to take a look at the whole facility and see if future maintenance can be done there most cost effectively. "

  • Aug 25, 2001