News

Extra students please school officialsFirst-week enrollment surprised officials, and offered a budget windfall.

Sixty more students than school officials expected showed up for class this week. While district projections suggested that Bainbridge public school enrollment would decline by 28 students this year, to 3,782 full-time equivalent students, first-week totals turned out to be 3,847.The news leaves district officials pleased - if puzzled.We certainly didn't expect it, Deputy Superintendent Ken Crawford said. Even if our usual attrition rate of 20 students per year holds, the district will still have 44 students and $175,000 (in state funding) more than we thought.

  • Sep 12, 2001

“When words fail, what have we left?”

"In the face of the unimaginable, we find our humble words of little consequence, and we presume to offer none today. The Bainbridge Island Review asks readers simply that as you turn to this page, please observe a moment of silence, reflection and prayer, for our nation and our world. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

Yesterday the world, today BainbridgeWell-traveled designer Bill McKnight opens his first retail outlet in Winslow.

You've probably seen Bill McKnight's interior design work.Maybe you haven't been to Singapore's storied Raffles Hotel recently to see the work McKnight has done on that symbol of Britain's empire, still consistently ranked as one of the world's best hotels. Or perhaps you haven't caught his work at the Delta Whistler Hotel in Canada, or the White Pine Lodge in Schweitzer, Idaho.But if you've been to REI's flagship store in Seattle, or to almost any Nordstrom, you've seen McKnight's style - one he's bringing to Bainbridge Island in the form of a home-furnishings retail outlet in the Pavilion.

  • Sep 12, 2001

State, feds driving shoreline review

The city moratorium on some shoreline development is driven principally by the requirement that the city update its 1996 shoreline plan and make it conform to new state rules by September 2002.But five days after the Bainbridge city council imposed its moratorium, the state Shoreline Hearings Board struck down the new state rules, calling into question both the time frame and the requirements that the city must meet.

  • Sep 8, 2001

Board opposes by-district electionsCounty commissioners are united against the controversial provision.

"Kitsap County Commissioners are united in their opposition to a proposal to elect future commissioners by district rather than at large.Reaction was unanimous when the commissioners were presented with the draft charter for Kitsap County last week. The document was submitted by the 21-member board of freeholders, who have drafted the charter over the past year.Among other changes proposed in the draft document, the county commission would be expanded to five members from the current three. But it also includes a provision under which commissioners would be elected by district rather than countywide. "

  • Sep 8, 2001

Search for a long-lost sisterThe quest for an historic launch leads to Bainbridge Island – so far…

The family history dates back more than seven decades, to a boathouse on Lake Washington. There, two sisters began life - Husky in 1923, and Conny nine years later - as launches used by University of Washington rowing coaches. The latter was named for Hiram Conibear, the legendary Husky crew coach whose rowing stroke remains the accepted standard throughout the world, according to the official U.S. athletic website.The vessel now belongs to Kirk Knapp, an Arlington resident who hopes to locate Husky and reunite the long-separated siblings. My guess is that whoever had - or has - her isn't even aware of what a wonderful piece of history they have, Knapp says.

  • Sep 8, 2001

Too hasty on moratorium

"When the city council imposed a moratorium on some shoreline development, including docks and bulkheads, it acted on the belief that the city had only a year to revise such regulations to conform to new state requirements. Five days later, the state Shoreline Hearings Board kicked the props out from under the whole plan, when it tossed out those same state requirements and told the Department of Ecology to rewrite them. By law, local jurisdictions have 24 months to bring their programs into conformity with new state requirements, and that law is what triggered the city's time-line. "

  • Sep 8, 2001

A long look at island shorelinesShould projects be put on hold while the city mullsnew regulations?

With a review of local shoreline regulations under way, and goaded by opponents of new docks in Blakely Harbor, the city has imposed an emergency moratorium on some waterfront development.The moratorium went into effect Sept. 3; the city council is expected to hold a public hearing in early October, at which time it could modify or repeal the measure.Planning officials say the move will give them time to consider new regulations being driven by state and federal agencies. We are in the process of developing new shoreline regulations, and are seeing an increase in permit applications, said Planning Director Stephanie Warren. We want to do that work without reviewing permits.

  • Sep 8, 2001

“State, feds driving shoreline review”

"The city moratorium on some shoreline development is driven principally by the requirement that the city update its 1996 shoreline plan and make it conform to new state rules by September 2002.But five days after the Bainbridge city council imposed its moratorium, the state Shoreline Hearings Board struck down the new state rules, calling into question both the time frame and the requirements that the city must meet. "

  • Sep 8, 2001

Math down, language upPreliminary WASL results are mixed for island students.

Math scores among elementary-age Bainbridge students are declining, while reading, writing and listening skills continue to climb.Those are the preliminary findings of the latest round of Washington Assessment of Student Learning testing.While preliminary, this data does invite attention to the area of mathematics, said Faith Chapel, new superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Bainbridge Island School District.Results from the WASLs and other tests will be analyzed during this year's K-12 mathematics program review, she said.

  • Sep 5, 2001

Prudence marks school budgetWith district enrollment stagnant, officials buckle down.

A conservative approach marks the 2001-2002 district budget adopted by the Bainbridge Island School Board last week. With expenditures only $260,000 below revenues, this is a very tight budget indeed, district financial officer Peggy Paige said. There is little room for unplanned expenditures.The district projects $26.412 million in revenue for the coming year, and $26.150 million in expenditures.

  • Sep 5, 2001

“Prudence marks school budgetWith district enrollment stagnant, officials buckle down.”

"A conservative approach marks the 2001-2002 district budget adopted by the Bainbridge Island School Board last week. With expenditures only $260,000 below revenues, this is a very tight budget indeed, district financial officer Peggy Paige said. There is little room for unplanned expenditures.The district projects $26.412 million in revenue for the coming year, and $26.150 million in expenditures. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

Fine choices in primary

"Mail-only primary ballots, which should appear in Bainbridge mailboxes this week, are abbreviated affairs, as only two city council races and the open seat on the fire commission attracted enough contenders to require a primary election. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

“Math down, language upPreliminary WASL results are mixed for island students.”

"Math scores among elementary-age Bainbridge students are declining, while reading, writing and listening skills continue to climb.Those are the preliminary findings of the latest round of Washington Assessment of Student Learning testing.While preliminary, this data does invite attention to the area of mathematics, said Faith Chapel, new superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Bainbridge Island School District.Results from the WASLs and other tests will be analyzed during this year's K-12 mathematics program review, she said. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

Dog Daze a way of giving back to Helpline House

Just saying thank you wasn't enough.Jillian Bateman sought a more tangible expression of gratitude to Helpline House, so she is producing the Dog Daze benefit concert, Sept. 9.I wanted to show them I appreciate what they've done, Bateman said. And I guess I do like organizing stuff.

  • Sep 5, 2001

Mastering the gift of making you giveFund-raiser extraordinaire Larry Mills is Bainbridge Citizen of the Year.

"Unlike most of us, Larry Mills doesn't mind asking other people for money.His willingness to undertake fund-raising projects has made him much in demand as a board member for organizations such as the Bainbridge Library, Bainbridge Performing Arts and the Bainbridge Foundation.For his charitable work on behalf of a variety of island causes, the Bainbridge Island Kiwanis Club has named Mills its 2001 Citizen of the Year. "

  • Sep 5, 2001

School zone safety gets a boostBetter signs and reduced speeds all day will complement tougher enforcement.

Better signs and high-profile police presence will promote safety in school zones this fall, advocates hope.A grant from the Washington State Traffic Safety Commission will fund overtime work and put extra patrol officers around schools for the next two weeks, Bainbridge Police Traffic Officer Rob Corn said. Police will use radar enforcement and a portable speed sign to show drivers how fast they're going.Also, the city's public works department will revise school zone speed limits to specify 20 mph from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for Blakely and Wilkes elementary schools during weekdays.

  • Sep 1, 2001

Interest strong among fire hopefulsVoters will narrow the field to two on the primary ballot.

"Continuing a recent trend of high interest in service on the Bainbridge Island Fire Board, four candidates go before voters in the Sept. 18.All vie for the single open seat on the three-person board, and two will advance to the November general ballot. In interviews with the Review this week, candidates discussed their qualifications and views on issues facing the department, including tax funding; collective bargaining with career fire personnel; maintaining the volunteer program; and developing facilities and equipment. "

  • Sep 1, 2001

Schools plan to beat construction

"The school bus hits the road Sept. 5, and the school district hopes students will be on board.Administrators say that increased bus ridership will lessen traffic tie-ups due to roundabout construction.We're encouraging everyone to ride to diminish traffic congestion and enhance students safety, deputy superintendent Ken Crawford said.Construction will begin between Sept. 10 and Oct. 1, according to city officials. The intersection of High School Road and Madison Avenue is slated to be closed to traffic for 21 days - but may be closed for longer, if inclement weather delays building. "

  • Aug 29, 2001

Residency put to rest

"We were pleased with Kitsap County Auditor Karen Flynn's decision last week declaring Bill Nelson to be a resident at his folks' Wing Point home, and thus eligible to run for office from Bainbridge Island's central ward.It's not that we necessarily favor Nelson - it's too early for us to make up our minds. But we like voters to have choices, and Nelson is a clear-cut alternative to neighborhood activist Bill Knobloch, whose neighbors challenged Nelson's residence, and youthful barista Houston Wade. "

  • Aug 29, 2001