News

Dot com keeps vessels in ship shape

If there’s one thing a boater can count on, it’s that things will break. And there’s at least a strong possibility that wherever the boat is, the replacement part isn’t. That situation, Hal Cook thought, was begging for a hi-tech solution. So he created Go2Marine, a Bainbridge-based on-line parts store that can get almost anything almost anywhere, and can go it overnight if you really need it. “There is a huge need to get the right part fast for boats of 100 feet or less,” Cook said. “Supply stores in local markets will have some things, but we have a lot of additional stuff that people need.”

  • Sep 22, 2001

Music for the long road back

Although Dewey Palooza is a benefit for a family in need, the evening of music and food planned for Sept. 29 may feel more like a big party. All the performers are friends of the family – musicians who have sung with Larry Dewey for years, showcased by him at Seabold Second Saturday events. “Pat and Larry Dewey have contributed so much to our community,” Bruce Haedt says, “teaching our children, organizing arts events, being our friends. “We want to give them a gift of celebration and joy.”

  • Sep 22, 2001

Mayoral hopefuls woo businessIn their first joint appearance, the candidates cite their concern for Winslow.

Agreeing that a vital downtown core is a critical element of the island's quality of life, two mayoral candidates tried to persuade Bainbridge Chamber of Commerce members that they know what the city must do to enhance local business.The business community has been somewhat neglected, and we need to bring them into more participation, mayoral candidate Chris Llewellyn said in a face-off before chamber members Thursday.Her opponent, Darlene Kordonowy, said that many of the issues facing the business community call for decisions from a source other than the mayor's office.The mayor doesn't make a lot of the decisions (that impact business), Kordonowy said, but the mayor can set priorities, say downtown business is important and we need to pay close attention.

  • Sep 22, 2001

Sidewalks trip daycare plan

To Doug and Kathy Hartley, the blackberry-choked property on the east side of Madison Avenue at New Brooklyn Road looked like an ideal new site for their First Years Daycare operation. It offered a central location, on the way to the ferry. And the new buildings going up nearby looked like they could add to their customer base. “Some of the people who will be moving into those (Sakai Village) townhouses will have kids,” Kathy Hartley said. “We thought it was a great spot.” So they made a deal for the land, designed a 4,600-square-foot building with three outdoor play areas and 17 surface parking spots.

  • Sep 22, 2001

Bainbridge soars on WASLsStatewide results show island students at the top.

Bainbridge students got high marks on the Washington Assessment of Student Learning tests - higher than most of their peers around the state.District officials attribute the students' success on the standardized tests to parents who send students to school ready to learn, kids who are motivated, and teachers who are talented.There aren't many districts that can match this district's parent and community support, said Faith Chapel, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction, and we also have a dedicated set of teachers who work toward aligning curriculum to help students meet standards.

  • Sep 22, 2001

The long roadDewey Palooza helps a family trying to come back after a devastating injury.

Although Dewey Palooza is a benefit for a family in need, the evening of music and food planned for Sept. 29 may feel more like a big party.All the performers are friends of the family - musicians who have sung with Larry Dewey for years, showcased by him at Seabold Second Saturday events. Pat and Larry Dewey have contributed so much to our community, Bruce Haedt says, teaching our children, organizing arts events, being our friends.We want to give them a gift of celebration and joy.

  • Sep 22, 2001

Whale of an auction at marine centerThe Poulsbo facility hopes to bring in funds to upgrade its tanks and displays.

Several years ago, a dead gray whale washed ashore in Liberty Bay. Alarmed neighbors asked that it be carted away before it began to smell.But Poulsbo Marine Science Center members smelled something much different: opportunity.The whale's skeleton now hangs from the center's ceiling, the centerpiece of a facility now looking for new funds and members among Bainbridge and North Kitsap residents.Almost everybody under the age of 40 on Bainbridge - or Kitsap County for that matter - has probably had classes there, says Dick Krutch of Bainbridge Island.

  • Sep 22, 2001

Diversity issue pops up in new guise

News that the city’s infrastructure requirements frustrated a local couple’s efforts to build a day-care center on Madison Avenue, reported elsewhere in this issue, reminded us of a journalism professor years ago who defined an “event” as “a process made visible.” In this instance, our concern is not with the event. In today’s less-than-robust market for commercial real estate, Doug and Kathy Hartley should be able to hold onto their present Knechtel Way location for the First Years day-care operation, or perhaps find another home. Nor can we quarrel with the city’s decision to require sidewalks and a paved street, the items that drove up the Hartleys’ construction budget by roughly 20 percent, forcing them to scrap the project. Because the Hartleys specialize in caring for the very young – lots of tots in strollers – sidewalk access seems a reasonable requirement. But it calls our attention once again to an underlying process – the difficulty of maintaining diversity on an island whose desirability makes it a magnet for the affluent.

  • Sep 22, 2001

Dot com keeps ships in shape Ex-Pee Wee grid chief Hal Cook has 20,000 things for boaters on the Net.

If there's one thing a boater can count on, it's that things will break. And there's at least a strong possibility that wherever the boat is, the replacement part isn't.That situation, Hal Cook thought, was begging for a hi-tech solution. So he created Go2Marine, a Bainbridge-based on-line parts store that can get almost anything almost anywhere, and can go it overnight if you really need it.There is a huge need to get the right part fast for boats of 100 feet or less, Cook said.

  • Sep 19, 2001

“Dot com keeps ships in shape Ex-Pee Wee grid chief Hal Cook has 20,000 things for boaters on the Net.”

"If there's one thing a boater can count on, it's that things will break. And there's at least a strong possibility that wherever the boat is, the replacement part isn't.That situation, Hal Cook thought, was begging for a hi-tech solution. So he created Go2Marine, a Bainbridge-based on-line parts store that can get almost anything almost anywhere, and can go it overnight if you really need it.There is a huge need to get the right part fast for boats of 100 feet or less, Cook said. "

  • Sep 19, 2001

New townhome project proposedThe plan would cluster 56 units on High School Road East.

"The homebuilder who created the Weaver Creek subdivision in Winslow wants to build 56 homes on the 10-acre Martin-Patterson tract on the northwest corner of Ferncliff Drive and High School Road.By clustering the units on the west side of the tract, away from Ferncliff, he hopes to defuse the kind of neighborhood opposition faced by the Woodland Village project farther north on Ferncliff. "

  • Sep 19, 2001

Dawn of uncertain timesA search for explosives put the Wenatchee out of action Monday.

"On the newsstands, the morning headlines put Americans under the shadow of war.That cloud passed directly over Bainbridge Island on Tuesday, as fear of terrorism took the ferry Wenatchee out of action for four hours during an exhaustive search for explosives.Law enforcement officials were called after the vessel made its 8:40 a.m. departure from Seattle.Crew members - who are under strict instruction to report anything out of the ordinary - reported hearing an inexplicable metal on metal sound below the engineering decks, with the noise thought to be coming from outside the hull, Washington State Ferries spokesperson Susan Harris-Huether said.The crew heard the sound just before the vessel left Colman Dock, but didn't connect it with a possible threat until they were under way, Harris-Huether said.They just heard it the one time, like someone had attached an incendiary device or something, she said. That was their concern. "

  • Sep 19, 2001

Middle East peace: Is there a chance?A scholar offers his insights as part of the library lecture series.

If you wonder if peace has a future in the Middle East, Joel Migdal can offer more than a casual answer. We know that it is going to take the establishment of a Palestinian state, and the withdrawal of Israel from 95 or 96 percent of the Gaza strip, said Migdal, who will lecture on the subject next month as part of the Bainbridge Library Speakers Forum, and some compensation to the Palestinians for the 4 percent they don't withdraw from.Migdal brings a lifetime of scholarship to the question.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Review honored

The Bainbridge Review earned first place General Excellence honors in the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association contest for 2001.The award was announced at the WNPA's annual convention, held in Tacoma over the weekend.The Review topped 22 peer newspapers around the state with circulation of 5,001 to 9,000. Judges cited the paper's front-page design; news coverage that was attentive to community diversity; and the strongest editorials among entries judged - local and pointed.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Healing music for the darkest of timesThe concert will benefit a local academy.

Carol Willis Buechler might have gathered this group of friends to make music, even if she hadn't wished to raise money for her son's school.The benefit for West Sound Academy, scheduled for Sept. 22, is for Buechler a lark.The musicians are my friends, Buechler said, but they're all consummate professionals, too. We live what we do, and it's a lot of fun to make music with them.The musicians, who will play and sing a true cross-section of classical works ranging from Samuel Barber to Johann Sebastian Bach, are remarkably intertwined.Mary Foster Grant and Elizabeth Grant are sisters who have been playing and singing together all their lives.

  • Sep 19, 2001

Sure ShotPete Saloutos is hailed as a photographic legend.

"The athletes that Pete Saloutos photographs - the subjects of the work that recently made him a Nikon Legend Behind the Lens - have nothing on him, when it comes to energy and drive.Saloutos begins his day with a 4 a.m. gym workout, and gets to his computer by 6:45 - after a pit stop at Blackbird Bakery. For every one of me, there are thousands of photographers who fell by the wayside, Saloutos says. My strength is persistence.And perfectionism.To get a single shot of a row of swimmers diving from a pool's edge, Saloutos first spent six hours lighting each swimmer with her own light. A photograph of a cowboy herding sheep on a mountain crest took Saloutos six months to coordinate. "

  • Sep 15, 2001

Water access is a public obligation

Forty-five miles of shoreline. One public dock.That's the score on Bainbridge Island, for anyone who wants to maintain a small vessel but isn't blessed with the money to afford a waterfront home or a yacht club membership. (There are, by our count, two public ramps for motor launches and kayaks; but you can't really count Point White dock, which is more of a pier.) Certainly, the desirability of docks for recreation is as strong as ever, as evidenced by plans for several new structures across our waterways by private homeowners on Blakely Harbor.

  • Sep 15, 2001

Community responds to national tragedyServices and memorials spring up around town.

With the rest of the country, Bainbridge Islanders remembered the victims of this week's terrorist attacks with memorials on Friday. Noon services were held at island churches, while mayor Dwight Sutton addressed a crowd of about 300 gathered on the green next to city hall. Calling the moment sobering and somber, Sutton enjoined the crowd to help eliminate terrorism while resolving to uphold justice. A few minutes ago, we pledged allegiance to those principles, Sutton said, following a flag salute. If we do not honor those principles, we do not honor the dead. While those gathered spontaneously broke into God Bless America, a young woman in dreadlocks quietly laid a bouquet of sunflowers on a concrete pillar behind the mayor.Bainbridge students coping with the week's events also sought ways to express sorrow, find solace and show solidarity with the bereaved.At Sakai Intermediate School, 1,280 paper cranes were hung on the wire edifice surrounding the Sakai sculpture.

  • Sep 15, 2001

“Sept. 11, 2001: Another day of infamyThe island boosts security after terrorist attacks shock the nation.”

"Drivers were turned away at the ferry terminal gate, the silent streets and holding area symbolic of the pall cast over Bainbridge Island after terrorist attacks against the nation Tuesday morning.Downtown, few cars or pedestrians were about, as islanders stayed near televisions and radios while details of the horror in New York, Washington D.C. and elsewhere unfolded. "

  • Sep 12, 2001

From grand visions, tiny landscapesIllustrating images with words.

Donald Frothingham's paintings at Bainbridge Arts and Crafts remind one that scale and size are not synonymous.While the reproductions of his abstract landscapes in Images from an Unknown suggest vast landscapes, the actual works are 20 by 30 inches and smaller. The size really had to do with working in a confined space, Frothingham said.

  • Sep 12, 2001