News

Voters go with Kordonowy

Twin themes that emerged from Tuesday’s elections were “work hard, think green.” The winners of the mayoral and three city council races did that. They campaigned virtually full time. And they established themselves early on as environmental candidates, allowing them to carry their campaign to the Bainbridge business community.

  • Nov 10, 2001

Theft of flags is simply senseless

The flag had flown over the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., was given to the family by one of this state’s better known senators, and had been draped over the casket of a decorated World War I veteran before his interment. For the Ed Brunton family, it was an heirloom as well as a symbol of their patriotism. And if you happened to drive along Ferncliff near Grand Avenue sometime in the past month, you probably saw the enormous flag – 5 feet by 8 feet, it measured – draped from a front yard willow tree.

  • Nov 10, 2001

City looks at ‘conservative’ budget for ‘02

Anticipating approval of state Initiative 747, which would limit the increase in property tax collections to 1 percent annually, the city administration is proposing a “pretty conservative” budget for 2002.

  • Nov 8, 2001

Twin filmmakers uncover a conspiracy

It’s 3 a.m. by the time the film crew finishes adjusting lighting in a Seattle parking garage, and the cameras finally roll. The actors advance, plastic guns in hand. Suddenly, the garage elevator doors open and out pedal police on bikes, brandishing the real article. That’s not part of the script, someone says. “Drop your weapons!” police yell – and for a heart-stopping moment an actor is too frozen with fear to comply.

  • Nov 8, 2001

Roll out the roundabout

The new traffic roundabout’s grand opening Tuesday went like counterclockwork. The last glitch in the much-delayed project proved to be a reverse stencil job on the directional traffic signs.

  • Nov 8, 2001

Do islanders still want ferry repair yard?

As a year-long study of the ferry maintenance facility at Eagle Harbor begins, legislators want to know whether Bainbridge Island wants the facility. The initial feedback suggests that the answer may be “No.”

  • Nov 8, 2001

Restroom has gone to pot

Pity the potty. Damaged by insects and the elements, its fixtures worn and its porcelain sullied, the Waterfront Park restroom has seen its last flush. Monday afternoon, temporary fencing went up around the building, which includes a storage area and several covered picnic tables. It will be razed after testing for asbestos and lead paint determines disposal options.

  • Nov 8, 2001

A new Star on Madison Avenue

Jay Wence has spent most of his life in diners. And if all goes well, that won’t change now that he has moved to Bainbridge Island. Wence and his wife, Michelle Enslow, will open the Big Star Diner next week in the Madison Avenue spot formerly occupied by Al Packard’s Blue Water Diner. “I’m excited,” Wence said late last week. “Today I had a couple from Dallas knock on the door and ask if we served milkshakes.”

  • Nov 7, 2001

Bottom line for special ed

It’s hard to imagine a more will-motivated effort than the special education program in our nation’s public schools. As profiled in a two-part series in last week’s Review, the program’s aim is lofty indeed – educating students with physical, mental and emotional handicaps to the same level as their peers.

  • Nov 7, 2001

Encaustic painter waxes expressionistic

It might be pleasant to disappear into a Tom Fehsenfeld encaustic painting. The lush landscapes at Kurt Lidtke Galleries glow with layers of translucent wax and rich textures that seem to invite touch. The works are abstractions of Fehsenfeld’s Bainbridge neighborhood. “My inspiration comes from small, local geographies,” Fehsenfeld said, “my farmhouse encircled by garden, orchard and woods – and the few miles of countryside within walking distance.”

  • Nov 7, 2001

It took an island to build a library

For the creative team that produced “They Liked Noble Causes: How a Community Built a Library,” the book was their own “noble cause.” A volunteer writing and design project to benefit the Bainbridge public library, the collaboration paid an unexpected dividend when the book recently received the International Association of Printing House Craftsmen Gold Award.

  • Nov 7, 2001

UPDATE:Kordonowy, open space levy earn easy victories

Darlene Kordonowy and a levy to save Bainbridge open space rode overwhelming voter support to victory Tuesday. Kordonowy earned better than 63 percent against Chris Llewellyn in the race to succeed Dwight Sutton as the next mayor of Bainbridge Island.

  • Nov 7, 2001

Does money talk in Bainbridge elections?

ELECTION COVERAGE: Live election coverage for Bainbridge Island -- Sponsored by BIB, Northland Cable and the Bainbridge Review. Mayoral, Council, Fire Commissioner and School Board races will be featured, with interviews from the candidates. Coverage begins at 8 p.m. On a state and national level, it is generally conceded that money is indispensable to a successful political campaign – a badly outspent candidate seldom wins. If that also holds true for Bainbridge Island, then you’d put your bets on Darlene Kordonowy for mayor and Bill Nelson for the central ward city council seat, because both have far outspent and out-fundraised the opposition. But observers of the Bainbridge Island political scene say the personal touch may still be more important than a media campaign. “A big part of the campaign on Bainbridge Island is vouching,” said David Harrison, a political science faculty member at the University of Washington and an adviser to Sen. Maria Cantwell, who has run for both school board and the state legislature. “People who get behind a candidate and spread the word to their friends can be tremendously important.” According to statements filed with the state Public Disclosure Commission, Kordonowy has raised some $24,500, compared to the $8,400 raised by her opponent, Chris Llewellyn.

  • Nov 5, 2001

Finding a way for all children to learn

In late spring of 2001, after one year in the district, special services director Merle Montani quit abruptly, citing the need to finish her dissertation. Without time to conduct a national search for a new director – and aware of the shortage of special education personnel nationwide – the district hired the principal of Woodward Middle School, Clayton Mork. Mork, who calls himself “a systems guy,” continued the assessment of special education programs begun with last spring’s roundtable discussion.

  • Nov 3, 2001

As winter approaches, Bainbridge High School dramatists indulge in summer reveries

Fairy Queen Titania strokes Nick Bottom’s long ears. The fairy queen is impelled by a magic spell cast by her rival Oberon to love the first being she sees upon awakening. So Titania has fallen for the ludicrous combination of donkey and man – as she has for more than 400 years, to the universal delight of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” audiences.

  • Nov 3, 2001

Ferry ads are bad band-aids

For most of us, the ferries are a part of the island’s charm. Those of us who don’t commute can still find the ride something of an adventure, particularly on those sunny days when the view ranks with any panorama on the planet. For commuters, the ride can be an extension of the office for work, the living room for visiting or the library for quiet reading.

  • Nov 3, 2001

Fairy art in ferry land

Willow DaNaan’s art prints – on view at Cafe Madison for the “Holiday Island Magic” Arts Walk Nov 4 – are images of the supernatural crafted with technical wizardry. This artist’s computer-generated prints feature three-dimensional fairies in Maxfield Parrish-like idealized landscapes.

  • Nov 3, 2001

‘This ferry ride was brought to you by…’

State ferries may become floating advertising kiosks to keep the boats afloat. But they won’t be floating billboards -- external advertising visible from the shores is not in the cards. “We are accepting information from companies, organizations and individuals about advertising, and asking for their best estimates on how much revenue some or all of their programs could raise,” said Washington State Ferries public affairs Director Pat Patterson.

  • Oct 31, 2001

BI businesses regroup

The bad news is that the economic fallout from the September terrorist attacks definitely reached Bainbridge Island. The good news is that for the most part, the effect seem to be dissipating. “There was literally nothing for a few days,” said Sally Loomis of Loomis Travel. “We were busy refunding and reaccomodating people.”

  • Oct 31, 2001

Chrisman hammers his music home

Simon Chrisman calls the hammer dulcimer he plays for the First Fridays audience Nov. 2 a “piano without the keys.” The description is apt. The dulcimer is like a piano without a lid – the strings running parallel to the sounding board, the felts controlled with a foot pedal – but the indirect action of the keys is short-circuited by putting the felt hammers in the musician’s hands.

  • Oct 31, 2001