Image courtesy of Eagle Harbor Book Company | Timothy Wise will visit Eagle Harbor Book Company to discuss his new book “Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food” at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27.

Image courtesy of Eagle Harbor Book Company | Timothy Wise will visit Eagle Harbor Book Company to discuss his new book “Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food” at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27.

Timothy Wise talks ‘Eating Tomorrow’ at Winslow shop

Timothy Wise, senior researcher at the Small Planet Institute, where he directs the Land and Food Rights Program, will visit Eagle Harbor Book Company to discuss his new book “Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food.”

The author’s visit is planned for 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27. The event is free and open to the public.

Called “A powerful polemic against agricultural technology” by Nature, the book seeks to prove the world already has the tools to feed itself without expanding industrial agriculture or adopting genetically modified seeds.

Wise is also a senior research fellow at Tufts University’s Global Development and Environment Institute, where he founded and directed its Globalization and Sustainable Development Program. He previously served as executive director of the U.S.-based aid agency Grassroots International.

Few challenges are more daunting than feeding a global population projected to reach 9.7 billion in 2050 — at a time when climate change is making it increasingly difficult to successfully grow crops.

In response, corporate and philanthropic leaders have called for major investments in industrial agriculture, including genetically modified seed technologies. Reporting from Africa, Mexico, India, and the United States, Wise’s book uncovers how in country after country agribusiness and its well-heeled philanthropic promoters have hijacked food policies to feed corporate interests.

Most of the world, Wise reveals, is fed by hundreds of millions of small-scale farmers, people with few resources and simple tools but a keen understanding of what and how to grow food. These same farmers, who already grow more than 70 percent of the food eaten in developing countries, can show the way forward as the world warms and population increases.

Wise takes readers to remote villages to see how farmers are rebuilding soils with ecologically sound practices and nourishing a diversity of native crops without chemicals or imported seeds. They are growing more and healthier food; in the process, they are not just victims in the climate drama but protagonists who have much to teach us all.

More in Life

Bainbridge arts community finds its immunity online

Art endures. Creative passions can’t be contained inside one’s own four walls,… Continue reading

Getting well, going home: Island poet’s debut collection explores travel, health, and language

A fter nearly three decades of considering and arranging the contents of… Continue reading

A temporary sign announces curbside pickup at Hammy’s. (Luciano Marano | Bainbridge Island Review)
Pleasant Beach Village announces extended curbside service

No need to come inside, thank you. Restaurants at Pleasant Beach Village… Continue reading

Bainbridge Artisan Resource Network closes to help curb spread of COVID-19

The Bainbridge Island Review site has lifted the paywall on this developing… Continue reading

Bainbridge art museum to close through March 31

The Bainbridge Island Review site has lifted the paywall on this developing… Continue reading

BPA cancels symphony/chorus collaboration performance in April

A collaborative production featuring Bainbridge Symphony Orchestra and Bainbridge Chorale slated for… Continue reading

Best Bets for March 13-15 | The Bainbridge Blab

Wash your hands. You can’t go wrong by staying properly hydrated and… Continue reading

Stargazers will learn about galaxy collisions at upcoming planetarium show

What happens when galaxies collide? Has our own galaxy experienced collisions and… Continue reading

‘King Kong’ returns to the big screen on Bainbridge

The silver screen’s preeminent giant monster, “King Kong” (1933) will return for… Continue reading

Never too late: Review culture writer picks five authors well worth rediscovering

The recent death of Charles Portis — famously press-averse author of “True… Continue reading

Youth Art Award seeks submissions from high school artists

Junior and senior students on Bainbridge are eligible for cash awards from… Continue reading