Image courtesy of Radio Pictures | An original theatrical release poster for “King Kong” (1933), which returns to the big screen at Bainbridge Cinemas at 1 p.m. Friday, March 15 for a special revival screening.

Image courtesy of Radio Pictures | An original theatrical release poster for “King Kong” (1933), which returns to the big screen at Bainbridge Cinemas at 1 p.m. Friday, March 15 for a special revival screening.

‘King Kong’ returns to the big screen on Bainbridge

The silver screen’s preeminent giant monster, “King Kong” (1933) will return for a special revival screening at Bainbridge Cinemas at 1 p.m. Sunday, March 15.

Directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, with a screenplay by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose, the film was developed from an idea conceived by Cooper and Edgar Wallace and stars Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot and Robert Armstrong.

It opened in New York City on March 2, 1933, to rave reviews — and has become one of the most iconic films of all time.

The famous stop-motion animation was done by Willis O’Brien, perhaps best remembered for his work on “The Lost World” (1925) and “Mighty Joe Young” (1949), for which he won the 1950 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects.

The story famously follows a film crew, led by an obsessive director, who travel to the forbidding and remote Skull Island, intent on documenting the native village and investigating legends of a monstrous creature named Kong.

Culminating in the titular titan’s now-immortal scaling of the Empire State Building, the film, despite its more rudimentary elements and later reinterpretation as possibly racist, was even so late as 2002 praised by the likes of Roger Evert, who said, “In the very artificiality of some of the special effects, there is a creepiness that isn’t there in today’s slick, flawless, computer-aided images … Even allowing for its slow start, wooden acting and wall-to-wall screaming, there is something ageless and primeval about ‘King Kong’ that still somehow works.”

It was ranked No. 43 on the American Film Institute’s list of “100 Years … 100 Movies.”

Visit www.farawayentertainment.com to learn more.

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