Image courtesy of Eagle Harbor Book Company | Mother/son author duo Roberta Newland and John Newland-Thompson will read from their new book “The Cle Elum Fire of 1918” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9 at Eagle Harbor Book Company.

Image courtesy of Eagle Harbor Book Company | Mother/son author duo Roberta Newland and John Newland-Thompson will read from their new book “The Cle Elum Fire of 1918” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9 at Eagle Harbor Book Company.

Authors recount great Cle Ellum fire

Mother/son author duo Roberta Newland and John Newland-Thompson will read from their new book “The Cle Elum Fire of 1918” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9 at Eagle Harbor Book Company.

Cle Elum was founded in 1883 by Walter Reed and Thomas Gamble. The name, from Tle-el-Lum, is a rendering of the local Native American phrase for “swift water.”

Nestled in the eastern foothills of the Cascades, Cle Elum grew as a railroad town, transporting lumber and coal, both from nearby Roslyn and later from Cle Elum itself. In 1891, it survived its first fire. In 1918, after reaching its population high of over 2,700 residents, a catastrophic fire broke out on a windy June day.

Two-thirds of the townspeople were left homeless, and the majority of the town was destroyed.

Cle Elum rose again from the ashes, thanks to the will of its citizens and help from all around the Pacific Northwest.

Newland, whose grandfather lost his barbershop in the fire, and her son, a writer and editor, have compiled vivid images that depict Cle Elum before the fire, during the blaze, and as the city rebuilt and developed. These images come from the Northern Kittitas County Historical Society, the Archives and Special Collections at Central Washington University, and the Ellensburg Public Library, with special thanks to Frederick Krueger.

Visit www.eagleharborbooks.com to learn more.

More in Life

Bainbridge arts community finds its immunity online

Art endures. Creative passions can’t be contained inside one’s own four walls,… Continue reading

Getting well, going home: Island poet’s debut collection explores travel, health, and language

A fter nearly three decades of considering and arranging the contents of… Continue reading

A temporary sign announces curbside pickup at Hammy’s. (Luciano Marano | Bainbridge Island Review)
Pleasant Beach Village announces extended curbside service

No need to come inside, thank you. Restaurants at Pleasant Beach Village… Continue reading

Bainbridge Artisan Resource Network closes to help curb spread of COVID-19

The Bainbridge Island Review site has lifted the paywall on this developing… Continue reading

Bainbridge art museum to close through March 31

The Bainbridge Island Review site has lifted the paywall on this developing… Continue reading

BPA cancels symphony/chorus collaboration performance in April

A collaborative production featuring Bainbridge Symphony Orchestra and Bainbridge Chorale slated for… Continue reading

Best Bets for March 13-15 | The Bainbridge Blab

Wash your hands. You can’t go wrong by staying properly hydrated and… Continue reading

Stargazers will learn about galaxy collisions at upcoming planetarium show

What happens when galaxies collide? Has our own galaxy experienced collisions and… Continue reading

‘King Kong’ returns to the big screen on Bainbridge

The silver screen’s preeminent giant monster, “King Kong” (1933) will return for… Continue reading

Never too late: Review culture writer picks five authors well worth rediscovering

The recent death of Charles Portis — famously press-averse author of “True… Continue reading

Youth Art Award seeks submissions from high school artists

Junior and senior students on Bainbridge are eligible for cash awards from… Continue reading