Letters to the editor

Write to help

To the editor:

During World War II 276 Japanese and Japanese Americans from Bainbridge Island were exiled from their homes and placed in concentration camps, which has had a profound and lasting impact on former incarcerees and their families. BI Japanese spent three years at Minidoka near Twin Falls, ID, which is now a National Park Service Historic Site. The BI Japanese American Exclusion Memorial is a satellite of the Minidoka NHS, and, like the Bainbridge Memorial, Minidoka serves as a place of healing and learning.

Just north of Minidoka, LS Power, a New York private equity firm is seeking approval, to build an industrial wind farm with over 400 wind towers as high as 740 feet. The project will permanently alter the experience of this sacred site. The NPS has stated that the towers “will fundamentally change the psychological and physical feelings of remoteness and isolation one experiences when visiting Minidoka NHS.”

The BI Japanese American Community is voicing strong opposition to the Lava Ridge Wind project and requests your help. Public comments are being accepted until Oct. 20 for an environmental impact statement. If you want to help, go to www.minidoka.org/blog/2021/9/15/bureau-of-land-management-extends-public-scoping-for-the-lava-ridge-wind-project. Karen Matsumoto

Bainbridge Island

Like Moriwaki

Clarence Moriwaki will bring much-needed leadership, experience and common sense to the Bainbridge Island City Council. I have worked with Clarence for many years and witnessed his integrity and good judgement. Let’s elect a council member who understands how good government works.

Wayne Roth

Bainbridge Island

Select Deets

To the editor:

I’m happily voting again for Joe Deets, as Joe has reliably fulfilled his campaign promises to the best of his ability. A long-time champion for environmental protections and climate change actions, Joe has spent years working with solar energy and promoting climate change awareness. Joe actively supports affordable housing for seniors and all islanders with modest incomes and was instrumental in having COBI dedicate $3 million of the city’s $7 million of federal COVID-19 recovery funds to create affordable housing.

Joe takes equity work seriously and makes a genuine, ongoing effort to understand ideas and situations outside his direct experience. He provided council support for the former Race Equity Task Force and is now working to improve and deepen Bainbridge Island’s relationship with our Suquamish tribal neighbors.

Joe doesn’t offer snappy soundbites: Thoughtful rather than impulsive, courteous rather than contentious, Joe respectfully listens to everyone and creates opportunities to hear viewpoints that differ from his own. Yes, Joe was among the councilmembers who respected the fact that the developer of the proposed Winslow Hotel had followed the law. As he often says, “If you don’t like a law, work to change it,” recognizing that attempts to bypass or derail laws can be extremely costly to a community. Joe is a community builder who serves and respects all the people of Bainbridge Island. Vote Joe.

Ann Lovejoy

Bainbridge Island

Choose Goodlin

To the editor:

We support Tom Goodlin’s candidacy for Parks and Recreation District commissioner. For years we’ve known Tom personally and through our shared work on programs that are dear to our island’s outdoor spaces, so we’ve witnessed his skills and commitment to the community. When on the board of the Bainbridge Island Land Trust Tom was a leader in the transfer of the Hilltop property in the Grand Forest. Now, years later, we cannot imagine the Grand Forest without the beautiful Hilltop connection between the West and East Grand Forest trails. Tom (among others) personally influenced my husband and me to get actively involved with the Land Trust and other parks, trails and recreation work on the island, and we continue to be active in this work to this day.

Tom has also been a leader of the Bainbridge Masters swim club, serving as president of the swimmers’ booster club board on two occasions, where I currently have the privilege of serving with him. Most important, Tom’s leadership style and approach to problem-solving will serve the BIMPRD Commission well. Tom is analytic while also being thoughtful and considerate of others. He always looks at every side of an issue, gives everyone an opportunity to express their points of view, and moves effectively to decision-making. He will make an excellent BIMPRD commissioner, and he has our votes.

Sara Tifft & Ray Victurine

Bainbridge Island

Pick Maron

To the editor:

As parents of teenagers who benefited greatly from having David Maron as their teacher for three years of middle school education, we write to express our full support for David for the Bainbridge Island Metro District Board of Commissioners.

David is an educator, parent, and leader in our community. In all he does, he brings integrity, intelligence, and enthusiasm. As a long-time islander, he recognizes the critical role of our parks’ open spaces and its recreational opportunities. His goal is to offer our community essential programming and services that benefit all of us. We hope you will join us in voting for David.

Stephanie Farquhar & Peter Murchie, Susan & Scott James, Amy & Teaque Lenahan

Bainbridge Island

Lower speeds

To the editor:

In last week’s traffic calming discussion, the Bainbridge Island City Council concluded that speed limits don’t work. There is an obvious counter-example, namely, Madison from High School to New Brooklyn. This road is wide, straight and clear. One could easily drive 40-plus mph. Why not? Because it has a 20 mph to 25 mph limit that people believe is enforced. Other school zones and neighborhoods are also counter-examples, as are the speed limit reductions the city made on many roads a few years ago.

The city’s public opinion question was extreme. People were asked whether they wanted 25 mph limits on all island roads, including major arterials and any roads with good shoulders. It’s amazing that 40% said yes. The speed limit you want depends on where you sit. If you’re thinking about the arterial in your route to the ferry, 30 or 35 can sound good. If you’re thinking about the narrow street in front of your house, where you and your children walk, 20 or 25 sounds a lot better.

Enforcement is the elephant in the room. If speed limits made no difference, we could throw away the signs, including those in school zones and dense neighborhoods, and tell police not to waste their time and our money enforcing them.

If this sounds absurd, it is. A combination of traffic calming devices and speed limits would be great. At best, finding the funding for many devices will take a long time. Speed limits cost little or nothing and with enforcement can make a difference now. If the council cares about public safety, and about the climate benefits of non-motorized travel, now is the time.

Peter K. Harris

Bainbridge Island

Pick Scott

To the editor:

We are voting for Kent Scott for Bainbridge City Council for a number of reasons.

Kent has been involved in local issues in his 33 years on the island – public arts commission, open space commission, design review board, volunteering with Bainbridge Island Land Trust, Squeaky Wheels and attending countless council and various task force meetings.

One of Kent’s primary goals will be to assure that growth and development aligns to our values and future vision. He firmly believes the key to managing this change is to align the Comprehensive Plan’s vision with land-use regulations and codes. The Comp Plan outlines the need to preserve and protect rural areas, rural quality of life and directs the majority of development to Winslow. This vision of our community was developed by residents and achieves the best sustainable future for all islanders.

We think most of us moved to Bainbridge for its rural character – historic homes, small farms, tree lined roads and wild open spaces. The reasons we moved to Bainbridge are in jeopardy. Kent is committed to find ways that preserve the fragile and remaining natural areas and believes, like we do, we must become more ecologically and sustainability-minded in our choices.

We choose Kent Scott because we know he stands for what we value on this island and why we still live here.

Jacqui & Jeremy Holland

Bainbridge Island

Column disturbing

To the editor:

Rich Manieri’s column Sept. 24 stated: “Last week, Rolling Stone ran with, and other left-leaning media outlets shared, a story about Oklahoma hospitals being overrun by patients who overdosed on ivermectin… The problem with the story is it wasn’t true. The hospitals themselves refuted the report.”

That misconstrues what the hospitals said.

Grove Hospital in Oklahoma actually stated: “…we have seen a handful of ivermectin patients in our emergency rooms, to include INTEGRIS Grove Hospital.” Further, “…such patients are adding to the congestion already cause by COVID-19 and other emergencies.” The hospital added: “There is a lot of media attention surrounding remarks reportedly made by Dr McElyea… he has publicly said his comments were misconstrued and taken out of context.” Dr. McElyea had been cited as overstating the problem.

Ivermectin is a veterinary drug that was touted as a treatment for COVID, as Manieri observes, “by vaccine skeptics,” and is reminiscent of the “Lysol therapy” mused upon by the former president.

Unfortunately, Dr. McElyea’s “misconstrued remarks” have become the focus of certain elements of the press, tending to draw attention away from the truth that people are actually overdosing on anti-science quack cures currently promoted by frauds, and then showing up in the emergency room.

In any number, I’m not sure why Manieri characterizes reporting on quack cures as “left-leaning” or why he misconstrued Grove Hospital’s statement, if not to discredit the “left-leaning” press. “Left vs Right” politics has no place in the war against COVID.

Stefan Paskell

Island Center

Choose Deets

To the editor:

I had the unique pleasure of meeting Joe Deets on the campaign trail when we both ran for the Bainbridge Island City Council in 2017. When you meet Joe you are struck by two things: 1. His warm and welcoming smile (which is genuine) and 2. The earnestness in which he listens and takes in what you have to say. It’s no wonder that voters on Bainbridge Island sent him to represent the North Ward by a resounding margin.

Joe’s record on the issues that the majority of islanders care about is well known. He’s a leader and has taken a stand on protecting our environment, standing up for affordable housing, support for small business, as well as promoting good governance.

Having served on the council with Joe and his opponent, Ron Peltier, I believe I have a unique perspective on the leadership styles of both gentlemen. While Joe looked for innovative solutions to tackling climate change, affordable housing and large infrastructure projects such as the police station, I witnessed Ron take the opposite approach. Ron operated with a playbook designed to divide his colleagues and the community. Coupled with multiple City Council Code of Ethics violations and NIMBY based policy-making mindset and the gulf between Ron’s turn-back-the-clock to the good old days approach to governance, and Joe’s forward-looking approach to our community, they couldn’t be more different.

Vote for competence, kindness and good governance. Vote Deets.

Matthew Tirman

Bainbridge Island

Vote Goodlin

To the editor:

It can be difficult to evaluate the qualifications of candidates for local public office. This one is easy. Tom Goodlin has the knowledge, training and experience specific to our island that make him an outstanding choice for our parks board. He is also a man of great character and integrity.

Tom values parks as a core element of the quality of life on Bainbridge. He has come to know our parks and public lands through years of personal service: six years as a board member of the BI Land Trust and many years coaching soccer and Little League. He has publicly advocated for Battle Point soccer fields, replacement of the failing Ray Williamson pool and Sakai Park planning.

I have worked with Tom on the board of Bainbridge Aquatic Masters and observed his intelligence, professional manner and respectful communications. Tom has my vote, and I encourage every Bainbridge voter to do the same.

Kate Meyers

Bainbridge Island

Like Maron

To the editor:

We had the pleasure of having David Maron as a teacher and a mentor, and based on our experiences he has many qualities that would make him perfect as a member of the parks board. As middle schoolers, David was one of the people we looked up to the most. What first drew us to David was his knowledge and love of the outdoors, specifically regarding rock climbing. But what made us appreciate him the most was his enthusiasm and excitement for getting kids involved in physical activity.

During our years at Hyla, David was constantly leading and organizing opportunities to keep students active. In the afternoons he led an after-school climbing club on the small Hyla rock wall; he created the opportunity for students to sign up for rock climbing electives at the local rock gym; and he was a leader on multiple overnight trips to climb at places like Smith Rock and Squamish. It is evident that David recognizes the need to provide opportunities for youth to be active in our community, and he takes the initiative to make this a reality.

Regardless of the activity or topic presented, we are confident that David will bring this passion and commitment to providing what is in the best interest of the community to his role as Bainbridge Island parks commissioner.

Will Siebert, Toby Bregar & Cooper Russell

Bainbridge Island

Scott Great

To the editor:

We want to endorse Kent Scott for Bainbridge Island City Council. He has been engaged in land-use issues for many years. During that time, I have been impressed with his attention to detail, his solicitation of the opinion of others while maintaining a broad overview of how the island natural resources can best be used.

His candor and intelligence will support a collegial atmosphere while business is conducted.

Michael Bonoff and Libby Anderson

Bainbridge Island

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