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Lynch rides cross-country to ‘fix’ disease

Kevin Lynch (right) answers Alain Huggler’s questions about Lynch’s 12-hour indoor bike ride to raise money for Langerhan’s Cell Histiocytosis. - Julie Busch photo
Kevin Lynch (right) answers Alain Huggler’s questions about Lynch’s 12-hour indoor bike ride to raise money for Langerhan’s Cell Histiocytosis.
— image credit: Julie Busch photo

He’s making a film while he rides from California to Boston on ‘The Big Fix.’

When Kevin Lynch got the call from the Histiocytosis Association of America a few months ago to ask if he was willing to ride cross country for a fundraiser and film a documentary of the trip, his answer was immediate:

No way.

“So we went back and forth and one thing led to another, and so they asked me ‘What could you do it for?’” he said.

“I said ‘Guys, you’re talking about a 30 day trek out of my life.’ I’m not a doctor. I’m not a lawyer. Yeah, I live on Bainbridge, but I’m at the lower end of that common spectrum. I have to work really hard.”

But after meeting some of the riders and the sponsors and getting a price that he could work with, Lynch is ready to put in some long hours as he participates in “The Big Fix,” a cross-country bike ride to raise money for Langerhan’s Cell histiocytosis, a rare blood disease similar to cancer that primarily affects children.

“It just came down to, ‘How could I not?’” he said.

Last Monday, Lynch, who works as the sales and marketing coordinator and spinning instructor at the Gym at the Pavilion, did a “Little Fix” bike ride by riding 12 hours straight outside of the gym.

Despite riding for several hours, he was still upbeat as he chatted with friends and patrons of the Gym, asking if they were interested in donating to the cause.

He broke the CompuTrainer record for continuous spinning by two hours and rode 273.18 miles – roughly the distance from Bainbridge Island to Cheney.

Lynch also raised $1,963.70 with the possibility of the pledges he collected being matched by a local philanthropist.

“The Big Fix” started last Saturday in Davis, CA and will end July 14 in Boston, Mass.

Along the way, the group, riding fixed-gear bikes, plans on stopping at several towns to visit kids who live with histiocytosis, along with holding fundraising events for the disease in some of the bigger cities they ride through.

The ride is 3,340 miles long and stretches over 28 cities and towns in 11 states.

Lynch said they’ll travel over several mountain ranges and average 120 to 150 miles a day – “which makes what I’m doing (the “Little Fix”) look like child’s play,” he said. “But it all ties together because it’s a ride to ‘fix’ this disease on ‘fixed’ gear bikes.”

The society called Lynch because of his film company Pro-Motion X-5 and the number of triathlons and triathletes Lynch has shot over a period of eight years.

Lynch is filming the ride on a helmet camera and will have another camera with him to shoot at several fixed locations across the country.

To save on his costs, he bought a bike that he had shipped to Davis, where he’ll put it together.

Then at the end of the race, he’ll either sell it or give it away or ship it back to Bainbridge.

He’ll travel with his gear stowed in an anvil case and carry a backpack on him with his riding gear and his clothes.

Despite the long days – he expects to be working 19 hour days and start at 4 a.m. for filming, not to mention numerous hours editing the hundreds of hours of footage down to an hour-long DVD by Labor Day – Lynch is excited about the journey.

“I think it’s going to be a great adventure,” he said. “I’m looking forward to it.”

He also said the trip was a chance to be part of something special.

“There’s not going to be many more opportunities that are going to come by (like this,)” he said. “I got some of the stories about the kids and some of the bios on the riders, and I went, ‘Oh my goodness!’ This thing is intense.

“And I’m one for drama,” he added.

To keep track of “The Big Fix” and their travels across the country, visit their blog at http://fixhistio.blogspot.com.

To learn more about the disease or donate, visit www.fixhistio.org.

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