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News Roundup -- Endowment makes awards/Blood drive asks for more/Park concerts open tonight

Endowment makes awards

Grants totaling $18,150 have been awarded to six non-profit organizations, the Bainbridge Island Community Endowment announced.

The Bainbridge Foundation was awarded $7,750 to upgrade its technology for donation accounting and online pledging and payment for the annual One Call for All drive.

The Bainbridge Arts and Humanities Council will receive $2,300 to replace outdated multi-media equipment used by that organization and other nonprofit agencies.

The Bainbridge Island Parks Foundation was awarded $2,300 to fund restoration of the Battle Point Park transmitter building, to provide new space for recreation classes and meetings. The funding will also provide construction of ADA facilities.

Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers was given $1,500 to purchase a computer to better match volunteers with requests for assistance.

A grant of $1,600 went to the Island Music Guild to complete construction of soundproof music studios at the guild hall at Rolling Bay.

The Kids Discovery Museum was awarded $2,500 for a science mentoring program for local elementary and middle school students.

The Bainbridge Community Endowment, founded in 2001, has approximately $2.1 million in assets. It also manages 11 donor-advised, desginated and scholarship funds. Information: www.bainbridgeendowment.org.

Blood drive asks for more

Islander Lisa R. Thomas and her sisters were able to spend four more months with their mother, who passed away in May, because people had donated blood.

“She was diagnosed in December 2004 with leukemia and in rapid decline,” Thomas said. “She would have died within 30 days except for blood transfusions from other people.”

In honor of her mother, Nita Stone, Thomas is sponsoring a second blood drive on the island, July 14 at the Phelps Road Fire Station.

A drive Thomas organized in late April in honor of her mother drew 49 donors, of which one-third were first-time donors. Greg Supancheck of the Puget Sound Blood Center said at an established drive, typically only 5 percent of donors are new.

“I extend a thank you to the community for everyone who came to the blood drive,” Thomas said.

According to the Puget Sound Blood Center, blood from 49 donors could help up to 144 people, as each pint is separated into about three units of either red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma or platelets, depending on the inventory need.

Inventory is particularly low in the summer when high school students go on vacation, as they account for over 16 percent of donations, according to PSBC.

The center is short about 2,000 donors each summer month.

Thomas’ mother needed whole blood and platelets, with transfusions required as frequently as every five days or not for three to four weeks.

Thomas said that she and her three sisters, who live out of state, stayed in a hotel near their mother’s hospital and shared stories and thought of all the things their mother had done that touched them.

“It made us realize all the gifts she’d given us over the years,” Thomas said. “We’d bring in a big box of photos to the hospital and she’d tell us stories, things you wouldn’t take time for (normally).”

“(The blood transfusions) gave her four months she wouldn’t have had otherwise, and gave us, as a family, four months,” Thomas said, “and an opportunity to say and talk about what we wanted to.”

The blood drive organized by Thomas in honor of her mother runs 1-4 p.m. and 4:45-7 p.m. July 14 at the Phelps Road Fire Station.

Businesses, individuals and organizations interested in organizing a drive, or for more information about giving blood, should visit www.psbc.org or call (800) 398-7888.

Park concerts open tonight

It’s not your usual one-night stand.

Kids will be running around Waterfront Park among parents and picnickers, with the crowd dancing to the rock and roll tunes of One Night Stand.

“We always try to have a fine time no matter who we’re playing for,” said Tom Svornich, One Night Stand drummer and co-founder. “We pick stuff that’s up, lively, energetic and fun for the audience.”

One Night Stand opens the Wednesday evening Concerts in the Park series this evening at 7 p.m. in Waterfront Park – the Bainbrige Commons in case of rain – hosted by the city and the Bainbridge Island Park and Recreation District.

Georgia Browne of the park district estimates 300-500 people attended each concert last year, with crowds diminishing only when rain forces concerts indoors.

True to its name, One Night Stand plays one-shot concerts all around at parties and festivals. Svornich describes their music as an eclectic mix of rock and blues from the 1960s to the 1990s with a touch of jazz.

The band does covers of songs by Dire Straits, Jimi Hendrix, Chris Isaak, Wilson Pickett and many others.

The band began in the 1980s with Svornich, bass player Mike Boyce and Ken Savage on guitar and vocals and two others.

“We were talking music and said, ‘Wouldn’t it be fun to play together?’ and we were invited to play at a party, so we threw the group together almost overnight,” Svornich said. “It’s snowballed since then,” via word of mouth.

All the band members have deep island roots whether through living on the island, working or family. Svornich is a third-generation islander.

In its current five-man configuration, Mark Holman on sax and flute and Bayard Buetow on lead guitar round out the group.

For tonight’s concert, Svornich says the band will try out some more “listening” tunes rather than just dance songs, but “you can’t resist but to dance some.”

– Tina Lieu

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