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COCAINE Impact statement next in Massey sentencing Police gathering community input

Deb and Thomas Fenwick in their Day Road studio and gallery. - Meagan O’Shea/Staff Photo
Deb and Thomas Fenwick in their Day Road studio and gallery.
— image credit: Meagan O’Shea/Staff Photo

The sentencing of Tammy Massey was postponed this week.

The federal Justice Department confirmed both Massey and husband David are charged with two counts of possession of cocaine and ecstasy for the purpose of drug trafficking and one count of firearm possession stemming from a search warrant of their home in 2004.

Tammy plead guilty to the offences in October, 2006 and was to receive her sentence Wednesday. David, has yet to enter a plea.

In 2004, Quesnel RCMP found and seized 2.5 kilograms of cocaine at the couple’s Norwood Road residence.

Police also found 671 ecstasy tablets, $19,490 in cash, six assault rifles, four hand guns, one sawed-off shot gun and four crates of various ammunition.

Days after his initial arrest and release on bail, David was arrested and charged for breach of bail conditions Dec. 20, 2004.

He was caught speeding in the Surrey area, well outside his travel restrictions – he’s not allowed further than 30 kilometres in any direction from Quesnel unless he alerts RCMP with a good reason.

He was also in breach of bail conditions for possessing a cell phone.

The two offences cost David $200 in fines.

Now, a judge in a Prince George courtroom told Quesnel RCMP drug section to draft a document – a Community Impact Statement – before Feb. 20, a day before the pair of accused make an appearance in court again.

“This document will assist the judicial system in appropriate sentencing,” Quesnel RCMP drug section Cpl. Gary Senner said Thursday.

Police estimate the cocaine seized Dec. 23, 2004 at the Massey residence is worth $200,000 on the street when sold at one gram a piece. The ecstasy tablets found are worth about $10 each, putting the street value at about $6,710.

“Ecstasy is a common drug used by young people today,” Senner said.

He must gather and present evidence through the Community Impact Statement to show how cocaine and drugs in general are hurting the people of Quesnel.

“The last three sudden deaths in Quesnel all showed an indication of cocaine abuse,” he said, adding the last sudden death case to hit the city was during Christmas.

Impact statements are something new to B.C.’s judicial system.

“Their main purpose is to assist courts. It gives people a chance to say how, in this case, drugs are affecting Quesnel, what it’s doing to young people and allows people to say they don’t want drug traffickers living in Quesnel,” Senner said.

“It’s another means to assist courts in showing the problems cocaine causes.

“It’s imperative people who are affected by cocaine call us.”

He assures the courts take a zero tolerance attitude toward witness intimidation, and anyone stepping forward to make a statement is protected.

“In 14 years, the witnesses I’ve worked with on drug files have never been approached or intimidated,” Senner said.

“Drug dealers know it’s not in their best interest to pursue witnesses.

“Does it happen? Yes, but usually for something more serious than this, like a murder.”

While not wanting to sound like a cliché or a broken record, he said it’s time for the community to take back the streets.

“We know who’s trafficking drugs in Quesnel,” he said.

“It’s our job to gather enough evidence to prosecute drug dealers. But we need the help of the community to police Quesnel and to clean it up.”

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