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Archive Results — 21401 thru 21425 of about 23975 items

WSF likely to stay put in harbor

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Moving the repair facility would cost too much, study says.
Washington State Ferries won’t be leaving Eagle Harbor anytime soon, it appears. The cost of moving the ferry maintenance yard to Seattle is much higher than previously thought, leading the agency to favor staying put, WSF officials announced Monday. “The numbers kind of begin to speak for themselves,” said Pat Patterson, WSF spokesperson. “Having said that, we’ll see where we end up. But we are proceeding with the understanding that we will be staying there.”

No food aboard ferries anytime soon

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Talks break down between the union and the WSF’s new concessionaire.
Unable to reach a contract agreement with the Inlandboatmen’s Union, a concessionaire has abandoned plans to restart food service on the Bainbridge-Seattle ferry route this summer. Washington State Ferries announced the breakdown of talks Monday on behalf of Cascade Concessions. The Vancouver, Wash., outfit declared failure after what were generally described as acrimonious negotiations with the IBU on a labor contract for galley workers. Nove Meyers, Cascade president, said Tuesday that the union would not budge from the terms of the old contract, which he said drove the previous vendor, Sodexho, away.

Rock on!

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

The BHS Class of 2004 moves into adult life with a pep talk on the value of longevity, in commencement exercises Saturday.
Don’t just rock. Rock on. With that sage advice, from an elder who’s seen some fast times, the Bainbridge High School and Eagle Harbor High School Class of 2004 entered the world of adulthood. “Rock with an eye toward the future,” said Ken Crawford, superintendent, urging graduates to temper their pursuits with wisdom and care. Commencement ceremonies Saturday afternoon filled the Memorial Stadium stands beyond capacity, with hundreds of family members and friends in folding chairs flanking the graduates.

Trails crew needed today -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

To mark National Trails Day – today, June 5 – the Bainbridge Island Park and Recreation District Trails Committee is organizing a volunteer work crew for trail improvement. The group will meet at the Fort Ward trail, the trail head for which is located on Country Club Drive, near the parking lot at the head of Blakely Harbor.

BPA troupe plays idylls of a king

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Fogell adapts Camelot legend to Playhouse stage.
Alaina Long and Pepper McCormick circle Kathryn McAtee, chanting the “Evil Song.” “We will cast our evil, wicked treacherous spells on you,” they sing. “You will think your scary, awful, worst nightmare came true.” Sakai Intermediate School fifth-grader Long and Odyssey eighth-grader McCormick, who play Morgana and Mordrid, respectively, in the BPA Theater School production “Arthur and Guinivere,” sport flowing black capes for the show’s dress rehearsal.

It was a bang-up year for BHS bands

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

The program has thrived under Stephanie Dupuis’ dynamic baton.
Trombones sing out a leather-jacketed, muscle-bound bass line. Bright trumpets jump with the hip-swinging, sashaying music of “Birdland.” The jazz band is in top form. The final Bainbridge High School band concert of the year culminated in toe-tapping music played with steady confidence from the heart. More than learning just music, the band program teaches life. “We use music to teach life skills. Music is just a vehicle,” said Stephanie Dupuis, director of band at Bainbridge High School. “These kids won’t play instruments for the rest of their life. I give them skills they can apply to all other aspects of life,” said Dupuis, known to her students as “L.J.” In its seven years under Dupuis’ direction, the Bainbridge High School band program and its members have come a long way.

Winery and city reach accord

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

A mediator helps forge an agreement on retail sales.
They may indeed sell wine before it’s time. A mediator Thursday forged an agreement between Bainbridge Island Vineyards and Winery and the city planning department to allow some retail sales at the winery’s new Day Road location, even as the City Council debates farming code revisions to permit such sales. The agreement – which was not available at press time, but the substance of which was confirmed by Mayor Darlene Kordonowy and winery co-owner Gerard Bentryn – will be presented to the council for consideration at its meeting Wednesday.

Wayward dog turns to side of good

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Once a drug dealer’s buddy, Rusty escapes Death Row and joins the cops.
The great irony of his young life – how, after a puppyhood misspent running with the wrong crowd, he’s now helping to put bad guys behind bars – may well be lost on Rusty. The simple joie de vivre, that’s another matter. It’s evident in every tug on the leash, every gleeful romp on the police station floor with his favorite red rubber ball. Even his job – sniffing out illegal drugs – is pursued with seemingly boundless enthusiasm.Hard to believe he’s calmed down a bit since his eight-week K-9 training earlier this spring.

Portrait for the cure

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Puget Sound Portrait Guild and Wing Point Golf and Country Club team up on June 4 for a portrait auction to benefit breast cancer research.
Strokes of a brush are helping to paint a brighter future in the battle against breast cancer. On Friday, islanders get the chance to bid for a portrait sitting by one of six professional artists from the Puget Sound Portrait Guild. The event is organized by Wing Point Golf and Country Club to benefit the Susan G. Komen Foundation for Breast Cancer. The Komen Foundation grants money for breast cancer research and to local groups providing services and promoting awareness to underserved women.

Hot tub sets home ablaze -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Fire destroyed a hot tub and damaged a home on Lariat Loop Wednesday evening. Fire crews rolled to the 9:30 p.m. blaze and found the tub and outside deck fully engulfed, with flames spreading to the residence. They were forced to remove roofing materials and exterior siding to gain access to pockets of burning embers, Chief Jim Walkowski said. No injuries were reported, and cause of the blaze is under investigation. Estimated property loss was $15,000, and content loss $3,000.

Putting petal to metal

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Artists turn to studio work to re-charge creativity.
For Michele Van Slyke and Peggy Brunton, a joint exhibit at Bainbridge Arts and Crafts, “Women Unleashed,” is a chance to let creativity emerge. The pair – island friends, both noted Northwest artists – combine forces to show figurative metal sculpture and painting, merged with images of plant life. Like many artists who make a living from selling work, they find that commercial success may come at a price, since public work must conform to public values.

City agrees to buy scenic Wyckoff beach

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

The city exercises a $4.9 million purchase option on the former Wyckoff property.
By this time next year, islanders will be free to enjoy a new public beach on the south side of Eagle Harbor. The Bainbridge Island City Council this week authorized the mayor to exercise a purchase option for some 22 acres of the former Wyckoff property at Bill Point, at a cost of $4.9 million. The purchase – which includes about one-third of a mile of sandy beachfront and the wooded hillside above, east of the Taylor Avenue road end and generally north of Eagle Harbor Drive – will close in December. But if folks happen to take a stroll there in the meantime, nobody is likely to complain.

Winslow eatery to become a Subway

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Colagreco Deli joins the national chain ‘to make a profit,’ the owner says.
The island is about to see its first national fast-food franchise in 15 years, as the owners of a downtown deli turn their eatery into a Subway sandwich shop. Larry Schoeberl says he and co-owner Patrick Winslade hope to increase patronage at what is now known as Colagreco Italian Style Deli, the Winslow Mall eatery they purchased last year. “The goal is to make a profit and generate business,” Schoeberl said. “We opened the deli a year ago, and it hasn’t generated enough business for a profit.”

Valor in turbulent times

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Island veterans recall their actions abroad, at home in World War II.
They drove trucks, captained ships, took photographs and cracked codes. They were Army, Navy, Marines, Air Corps and Coast Guard. Their experiences in World War II varied, but for Bainbridge veterans, the conflict was a personal watershed to be recalled each year. For Dick McCool, Memorial Day brings recollections of 12 of his fellow crew members killed and 23 wounded in a kamikaze attack. “They’re very important to me,” McCool said. “They’re a special Memorial Day.”

Sound to offer biz seminars -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Sound Publishing will host nine business seminars in June to present the results of the company’s latest readership surveys. Sound Publishing commissioned Pulse Research of Portland, Ore., to survey readers in each of its suburban Puget Sound markets in April. Pulse asked readers more than 100 questions about their shopping plans, spending habits, and media preferences. It is Sound Publishing’s fourth major readership survey since 1997; the last survey was conducted in 2001.

Ready for emergencies, ready for fun

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:13PM

Bainbridge ‘hams’ eschew email for the old-school challenge of amateur radio.
In case of earthquake, forest fire or Rotary Auction, call the Bainbridge Amateur Radio Club. Ham operators are often the unsung communications heroes in emergencies and other big events, member Leo Barnecut says. In last year’s California forest fires, “the ham radio operators saved their bacon,” he said. “The first thing to go down is telephone lines and then cell-phones, so ham operators are state-of-the-art in an emergency.”

A shoebox of wartime memories

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Karen Sladek shares her father’s correspondence from World War II.
Dusty letters in a cardboard box made history come alive for Karen Sladek. The first-time author’s tribute to her father is “Lucky Stars and Gold Bars,” a history based on Lyle Sladek’s letters home during World War II. “I’d never dreamed of writing a book,” Sladek said. “I didn’t know I had a book in me.” But she found herself as an author after she moved to the island from Kirkland in 1996 and quit her job as administrator of the University of Washington’s Center for AIDS and STDs a year later.

Report: school impact fees OK

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The district gets a second opinion, after complaints by a parent.
School impact fees on new homes are collected properly under state law, an attorney for the Bainbridge Island School District says. G. Richard Hill, of the Seattle firm of McCullough Hill Fikso Kretschmer Smith, said in a report released last week that the district is in compliance “with the spirit and the letter of the Growth Management Act and the United States Constitution.” He was retained to review the district’s impact fee program, after the fees were challenged by Daniel Smith, a citizen who follows local school issues.

Caring is their calling

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Youth leaders ‘adopt’ an islander stricken with multiple sclerosis.
Missy the cat is hiding from “the Thursday people.” The reclusive feline – an Island Health and Rehabilitation Center pet that has unofficially adopted resident Judy Kveitkauskas – retreats under the bedclothes when the teens, who named themselves for the day of their weekly visit, come calling. The cat has had time to acclimatize; the youths have visited Kveitkauskas, who is paralyzed by multiple sclerosis, every Thursday afternoon since January.

Berg’s drawings blend Picasso with Prismacolors

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Mackenzie Berg’s menageries are peaceable kingdoms where bugs and birds mingle, and a grasshopper’s antenna just might sport a spider’s web. “I don’t think there’s anything more beautiful than an animal,” Berg said. “The flowers and trees are gorgeous, but animals are so pure in what they do that to be able to capture it on paper is incredible.”

Legion plans observance -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Memorial Day Services sponsored by Colin Hyde Post No. 172 will take place at two locations on May 31. The public is invited to attend the programs, to “honor our dead, remember the cause for which they fought and affirm our trust in the future.” Starting at 10:45 a.m., Legionnaires, Auxiliary and others will meet at the Veterans Memorial at Bainbridge High School. A brief service will be conducted and the area surrounding the monument will be decorated with flowers and flags.

Spreading hope in a brown bag

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Woodward students take lunches to Seattle’s downtrodden.
To some 40 homeless people in Seattle’s Occidental Park, Woodward Middle School students brought more than lunch. Distributing bag lunches to the homeless in Seattle Friday, the school’s leadership class helped fulfill a mission of the Sebastion Galpert Scholarship Fund. The project was one of the first awards given out by the fund for “Adventures in Altruism” proposed by middle school students. “The thing people on the street thank me for is for bringing people like you around,” said the Rev. Nyer Urness, an islander and retired pastor who has worked with Seattle’s homeless population for more than 30 years.

Farm package before council

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Farmers say year-round retail sales would boost local agriculture.
Farmers love good weather during growing season. The economic forecast may be looking up, too, as the city finally considers letting them sell value-added products year-round. “On a small farm, you can’t make a lot of money just growing crops,” said Krista Martin of Meadowhawk Farm, “but if you make it into wine or create a product people appreciate, it changes the value of your crop a lot. The potential for income changes completely.”

Neighbor sues city over old decant site

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Dan Brewer says a creek is being polluted, even as the parcel is cleaned up.
Apparently dissatisfied with cleanup of the former decant facility at the Head of the Bay, a neighbor has sued the city seeking an injunction against future activities there, and seeking damages. The complaint was filed Thursday in U.S. District Court, under the federal Clean Water Act and Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Eagle Harbor Drive resident Dan Brewer charges that in storing road sweepings, ditch spoils, gunk from storm drains and other material on the site for years, the city is contaminating nearby Cooper Creek and a wetland, and threatening wells that serve Winslow residents.

Steamer trip is a sellout -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The Bainbridge Island Historical Society’s round-the-island tour aboard the steamer Virginia V won’t take place for another month yet, but the society is already planning to do another. Tickets still are available, however, for a cruise from Bainbridge Island back to Seattle after the around-the-island tour. The around-the-island trip, scheduled for June 27, sold out on the second day of ticket sales Tuesday, said Ralph Cheadle, co-chair of the event. “I expected we would fill the ship up for the around-the-island cruise, but I had no idea we would do it as quickly as we did,” Cheadle said.

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