Story Archives

Archive Results — 21376 thru 21400 of about 22650 items

Council candidates woo business support

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:28PM

Six candidates for the island’s three city council seats tried to persuade the island’s business community Thursday that they are better able to keep the wheels of island commerce turning. Each candidate answered three questions at the Chamber of Commerce’s monthly lunch meeting at the Commons.

The next mayor of Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:28PM

Chris Llewellyn knows what it’s like to be poor on Bainbridge Island. “I was a single mother at one point,” she recalls, “and I was so poor that I had to sell my bed to buy a chainsaw to cut firewood to keep the house warm.” Llewellyn has shared a lot of experiences with a lot of people on the island where she has lived most of her life.

The next mayor of Bainbridge

  • Oct 27, 2001 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 3:28PM

For Darlene Kordonowy, being in the middle of small-town politics is a way of life. She grew up in Belfield, N.D., population 1,054, where her father was mayor for 26 years. “Our life revolved around politics, the Ukranian Catholic Church, and how the boys did in sports,” Kordonowy said.

Walkers find island’s back roads

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

The Great Island Friday walking group may not travel fast, but it goes the distance. “Power walkers drop us right away,” member Ron Williamson said. “We are a meandering group – we stop, we look. “We especially like small houses and mailboxes that are funky, the art that people have in their yards – the things that make this island what it is.” In four years of casual Friday rambles, TGIF has covered more than 700 miles of island trails, beaches and roadways.

City, Suyematsu come to terms

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

After three years of negotiations, the city has reached agreement with owner Akio Suyematsu for public purchase of his 15-acre farm on Day Road East, to preserve the land as open space.

Long on love, but in short supply

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Driving up to the home of Suzanne and Cameron Fischer, one notices the bright plastic toys scattered across the green lawn. The interior of the house is neat – considering that six kids call it home. Three are the Fischers’ own and three are foster children. All are crammed onto the sofa to watch movies. “You can tell which are mine by the hair,” said Suzanne Fischer, indicating the three whose tousled mops are, like their mother’s, flaming red. The infant, toddler and 5-year-old who are the foster additions are otherwise indistinguishable from the Fischer kids.

What ‘they’ think of U.S.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Jonathan Miller-Lane loves a good question. “A really good subject can hook anyone,” Miller-Lane said. “You have to have a question that you yourself are truly interested in.” He poses one both pointed and timely when he asks a panel of Bainbridge youth and adults Oct. 24 how Americans perceive their national values – as opposed to what the rest of the world understands them to be.

Candidates square off at forum

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

An overflow crowd at the city council chambers heard the candidates for Bainbridge Island mayor and city council articulate similar visions for the community, while disagreeing on how to bring those visions to reality.

Retirees: still doing good work

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Few encounter Bainbridge nonprofit organizations without meeting the retired volunteers who contribute time and money to many of these organizations. And as more families need both parents in the workforce and have less time to give, retirees take up the slack.

District slow to renew Rowley contract

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Breaking from standard practice, the Bainbridge School Board let Superintendent Steve Rowley begin the school year without a three-year contract in hand. School officials confirm that over the summer, the school board declined to add a third year to Rowley’s contract, set to expire at the end of the 2002-03 school year. At the same time, the board made provisions for his possible departure by naming another district official as Rowley’s immediate successor.

Vote by district, freeholders say

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Kitsap freeholders believe that a county council elected by district only deserves a chance, given what they see as overwhelming public support. But they also think voters should have the final say. So the charter that the freeholders will put to voters next February calls for the five council members to be elected by geographic district in both the primary and general election. Then in 2003, the whole contentious issue of election method will be put to a vote.

Do fire candidates come with conflicts?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Questions of conflict of interest follow both of the candidates to succeed Alan Corner as Bainbridge fire commissioner. But both believe the conflict situations are relatively insignificant, and would not prevent them from serving.

Homecoming for new pool operator

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

To handle operations at the larger, more complext Bainbridge Island Aquatic Center, the park district has hired Eric Khambatta as pool operator. Khambatta, who grew up in Suquamish, is no stranger to Bainbridge aquatics, having worked at the Ray Williamson Pool while in high school and college. Since then, Khambatta has served as pool manager in Kirkville, Mo., and Anacortes before returning to this area with well over a decade of experience in pool operations.

No water yet, but soon

  • Oct 17, 2001 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 3:27PM

Just how much pool will $5.5 million buy? The public can find out this Saturday, at an open house at the new Don Nakata Pool and larger Bainbridge Island Aquatic Center. The event will give users a preview of the layout before the pool is filled with water next month. “We’re getting a heck of a lot,” said John DeMeyer, park district aquatics supervisor. “By capitalizing on the existing pool...we’ll have a major two-pool complex, plus a water slide, two complete locker rooms and a family changing area. That’s a 30,000 square foot facility. “And everybody will have access. There’s something for everyone.”

A neighborly thing to do

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

When terrorist attacks blew the world apart, two Port Madison women responded by bringing their own community together. “The world has to narrow to a neighborhood before it can broaden into brotherhood,” said Sara Faulkner, who with Nancy Blakey started the effort among north-end residents. “The recent events made us decide it was time to rebuild our community.” After the Sept. 11 terroist attacks on America, Faulkner and Blakey sent out flyers to 92 homes in the Port Madison area, inviting residents to a potluck supper on the beach. The response surpassed their wildest expectations – more than 200 people turned up.

Open Ericksen to Hildebrand, engineer says

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

Ericksen Avenue and Hildebrand Lane should be connected within the next two years, the city engineer says. And while the city council’s public works committee will consider the recommendation Monday, at least one member wants to delay any final decision until the already volatile issue of Ericksen’s design is finally resolved.

Building the gingerbread garage

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

Island abodes have appeared in “Better Homes and Gardens” and “Architectural Digest,” but the claim to fame for Robin and Mike Ballou may be unique. It’s their garage. “Friends have asked why our garage was featured in a book and not our house,” Robin Ballou said, “but ‘Garage’ is the book’s title, not ‘House.’” Mike Ballou, a professional builder, saw an ad in “Fine Woodworking” magazine from an author seeking garages with unusual uses. Ballou, who built both their Diamond Place home and garage/woodshop – even handmaking the Victorian trim most builders order from catalogues – mailed off a polaroid of the space.

In perpetual motion

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

Perpetual motion may never be achieved, but island skateboarders can come about as close as physics allows. The curves, contours and transitions of the new Rotary Skate Bowl are designed such that a skilled rider can zoom from one end to the other, swoop around the various bowls and make it back to the other end without taking their feet off the board. And for those able to scale one side of the largest, 8-foot bowl, turn around, and fly back to their starting point – and then do it again – there’s literally no end to the fun. “No pushing required,” said Brendon Corrao, age 28, between forays. “That’s awesome.” The island’s new skateboard facility made its formal debut Saturday at Strawberry Hill Park, 200 cubic yards of concrete shaped into a series of bowls and ramps, with smooth pool coping around the edges.

Garden Club a perennial delight

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

Devoted to flowers and friendship for 65 years, the Bainbridge Island Garden Club members gathered at the Bloedel Reserve Monday to celebrate their anniversary. If the club’s six-plus decades embody “continuity,” then the women seated in the drawing room of the Bloedel mansion – elegant dress blending with the formal setting – were the visual definition of “tradition.” Seven have been in the club for 25 years, a qualification for honorary life membership. Dorothy Noble could have been awarded a life membership twice over, for her 50 years in the club.

Fewer donors, but more money for Bainbridge Foundation

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

What started it all was a conversation over a cup of coffee, between the milkman and a doctor’s wife in 1959. “I was the head of the United Good Neighbors drive, and she was the head of the Red Cross drive,” said Ernest Biggs, who in those days maintained a dairy route around the island. “I had a quota that year of $10,000, and she said they’d raised $200, so we decided we had to do something.” The problem, they decided, was that too much effort was being duplicated. “The women on the island seemed to be the ones chosen to go door-to-door, but they were doing it half a dozen times a year, and were kind of worn out” Biggs said.

Luther’s legacy lives on at Bethany

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

At Bethany Lutheran, there is no clear line of demarcation between church and community. Service is important to Bethany’s members, who include the city administrator, some of the pillars of Helpline House and three of the last five Kiwanis Citizens of the Year. “This church has always had a very high proportion of people involved in the community,” said Senior Pastor Martin Dasler, citing that dedication as one factor that brought him to the church. The involvement extends to the seven-acre church campus on the triangle formed by High School, Sportsman Club and Finch roads, where the congregation moved in the 1960s from its original location in Pleasant Beach. “The site was donated to the church, and we believed it should be for the benefit of the entire community,” Dasler said. “So we have entered into a number of partnerships that involve the land.”

Winds shift on district-only elections

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:26PM

A move to district-only elections for some county offices may be losing traction, as those drafting a new Kitsap charter consider compromises or simply putting the issue to voters. A straw poll Tuesday among freeholders working on the draft charter showed support for district-only elections for an expanded county council – an issue that has left the group bitterly divided – has eroded to as few as 10 members on the 21-person board.

League forms to boost education funding

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:25PM

Veterans of Initiative 728 school funding effort have united to form a new advocacy group, the League of Education Voters. “We learned from I-728 that we win the battle but lose the war when the initiative funnels money to the schools, but Olympia cuts someplace else,” said Elaine VonRosenstiel, a former Bainbridge Island School Board member who helped draft I-728.

Politics of sludge: Where should decant facility go?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:25PM

The question was, how can a “decant facility” fit into your neighborhood? The answer: “No way – it can’t be done.” What was billed as an informational meeting on a proposed disposal facility on city-owned property south of New Brooklyn Road and east of Sportsman Club turned into an angry protest, as residents of the Commodore developments to the south filled the city council chambers and vowed to block the project.

Voters to decide on ‘portable’ judges

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:25PM

Voters will decide next month whether to amend the state constitution to create “portable” judges that could relieve trial-court backlogs, particularly in the state’s larger counties. Bainbridge Island Municipal Court Judge Stephen Holman, who was part of the judicial study group that recommended the change, says the amendment may not have a lot of impact in Kitsap County, but could be helpful across the water. “There is a backlog problem, particularly with civil cases (in King County),” Holman said, noting that because of the speedy-trial guarantees in the state and federal constitutions, criminal cases take priority on a court’s trial calendar.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Sep 19 edition online now. Browse the archives.