Story Archives

Archive Results — 21351 thru 21375 of about 22800 items

"Nakata, Cleven favored for camp"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:43PM

Nakata Park? Camp Cleven? An iconic island family and a longtime scoutmaster head the list of honorees being considered for a renamed Camp Hopkins.

Honor some real heroes

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:43PM

"We're still not sure just what credentials put the Major in Major M.J. Hopkins. Some recall him to be a veteran of the Canadian or British military and the first Great War; others tell us he served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, armed not with a rifle but a slide rule.However he earned his rank, by the time World War II rolled around, the retired Major Hopkins wore ignorance on his lapel right next to his bars, as part of a cabal that tried to keep Bainbridge Island's Japanese-Americans from returning here after wartime internment. "

Barrel of monksA lightheartedcrew of Tibetans will share insights and the artof the mandala.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"In a meditation on beauty and the transience of life, Tibetan Buddhist monks will create a complex but temporary artwork at the Bainbridge Public Library. The mandala, an intricately patterned circle of colored sand, will be started March 27, and take four days to complete.We chose this mandala, called Cheneriz, as a manifestation of the Buddha of Compassion, said Venerable Lobsang Wangchuk, among the delegation of monks. The mandala master has made these for 20 years. He is an excellent, a fantastic artist. "

"Liveaboards in, anchors outA new harbor plan calls for the use of buoys by boat dwellers."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"The Bainbridge Island Harbor Commission is once again weighing anchor on an effort to bring order to the quasi-chaos that is Eagle Harbor.The groups believes its plan preserves historic uses, including use by the liveaboard community.And this time around, the state may support it, a reversal of its previous opposition to the presence of liveaboards.Our policy now is that if environmental standards can be maintained, it's up to the local community to decide if it wants liveaboards, said Mark Mauren, Shoreline District Manager for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.The city has already decided that issue. The comprehensive plan refers to anchor-out living as an important element of affordable housing and island diversity, and the city has tried to support that community.Even so, the often haphazard location of liveaboards has been a confounding issue in attempts to regulate and manage harbor use.There has not been a well-defined anchorage plan, said Mayor Dwight Sutton. They've set their hooks pretty much where they wished. "

"Census numbers to bring falloutThe effects will be political and financial, officials say."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"By the end of the month - possibly even by the end of the week - the Census Bureau will disclose how many of us it counted as of April 1, 2000.The city's population figure, a matter of considerable debate, will trigger a broad range of consequences. "

Fund for French exchange honors Katie Horst

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"When Katie Horst died last year, her parents knew what she would have wanted - they have dedicated a fund to help Bainbridge exchange students go to France.Katie said that her trip to France was the happiest time of her life, said Sandra Horst, her mother. As a mom, I was so scared to let my daughter go to Europe without me, but I am so thankful that this made her so happy.Horst died last September at age 19, after suffering head injuries in a car accident. While she was in the hospital, friends set up a fund for her family, to help them through what they believed would be the long haul of her recovery. Those funds now will go to the exchange scholarship, while a flowering dogwood tree will be planted in a quiet ceremony this week at Battle Point Park, on a hill overlooking the pond and soccer fields on which Horst played. "

SAM curator brings love of artA four-talk series will share the wealth of the museum.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"In 18th century America, the equivalent of today's family photo album was the formal portrait. In the early 19th century, large-scale landscape paintings brought the Western wilderness to city dwellers with all the impact of big-screen special effects on today's audiences. Painting is the visual history of who we were as Americans, and what we are about now, said Ann Barwick, president of the Seattle Art Museum's Council of American Arts. That's why we can't ignore it. "

"Toward new, rich stories"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"In 1942, as many members of a small island community were taken from their homes by order of the federal government, a lone newspaper editor stood up and said, This is wrong. These are our neighbors, and they belong here among us.It's a story that grows richer with each telling, and contributes more than any other to Bainbridge Island's sense of place. And we suspect the life of Walt Woodward - whose passing we will mourn at memorial services this weekend - is the sort of tale that Scott Russell Sanders would applaud. "

Investors still bullish on Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"Can island philanthropy thrive in a down market?If you're bullish on Bainbridge, there's plenty of opportunity to beef up your portfolio as various local fund drives run through the spring.We were reminded as much after morning coffee this week with the Marge Williams Center board.Regular readers of this space know we've backed this project from the start, to create a permanent home on Winslow Way for five island non-profit agencies and a nexus for local social services, and have been offering regular updates on its progress. "

"At last, Nelson land a park"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"While officials consider an impact fee to fund new recreation areas, the park district's newest holding comes cheap.A dollar a year for 99 years.That's the lease price approved by the city council Wednesday, transferring control of John Nelson Park to the Bainbridge Island Park District.There is potential here, whether it be for picnicking, play or (nature) interpretation, park district director David Lewis said Friday, touring the five-acre parcel. I guess we're pretty wide open.The property, just north of the Bentryn winery off Highway 305, was bequeathed to the city of Winslow by the Nelson family some five decades ago. While the family's intent was to see it used as a park, it became a public works yard and materials storage area instead. "

Park impact fee taking shapeThe park district hopes to tap new construction for land acquisition.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"Saying that new parkland is needed to accommodate new residents, the Bainbridge Island Park District wants to impose an impact fee on new construction.The plan is to levy a fee of roughly $1,200 to $1,500 on a typical new home. Larger homes would pay more than the norm, and smaller homes and apartments would pay less. "

"Apartments planned on High School Rd.Fifty units would be bundled with office space, west of the Texaco station."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"A Bellevue developer hopes to break ground this summer on the first apartment complex on Bainbridge Island more than a decade.The mixed-use project, known so far only as the High School Road Mixed Use Project, calls for 50 apartments and almost 30,000 square feet of commercial and retail space. The planned project is on the north side of High School Road between the Texaco station and the American Marine Bank. "

Roundabout gets the green lightModifications were added to assuage concerns.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:42PM

"A roundabout was approved by the city council Wednesday, settling the future of one of Winslow's busiest intersections.By a 6-1 vote, the council OK'd construction of a 105-foot diameter, single-lane circle at High School Road and Madison Avenue, rather than a traffic light that had been proposed earlier. "

Apart from the pack'The Ice Wolf' uses native mythology to explore rejection.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"The Bainbridge Performing Arts theater class play The Ice Wolf does not shrink from difficult material.Set in an East Hudson Bay eskimo community, the play follows the sad progress of young Anatou, whose blond hair and blue-eyes set her apart from her fellows. I liked this script because it was not candy-coated, says Steven Fogell, Bainbridge Performing Arts' education director and co-director of the production with Joanne Keegan.The high school kids want to take on the challenging material, Fogell says. If they've stuck with theater for seven years, they're passionate about it, and they need to be rewarded.Realism shades into myth as Anatou (played by Jenny Black), ostracized for being different, appeals to the Wood God (played by Anthony Harvey). Her form is altered, her memory erased, in the magical transformation from eskimo to wolf. Results are the same, though, as the pack turns on the wolf unlike other wolves. "

Give the roundabout a good spin

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"Now entering the roundabout of public opinion are four vehicles, one coming from each direction:Driver 1: The World Traveler - Has seen and/or driven roundabouts in Europe and elsewhere; thinks they're swell once people understand them. Comment: If the French can live with roundabouts, so can you clowns in your SUVs...Hey! Nice Citro├źn! (A variant of this group vehemently disagrees, believing that nothing the French might do could possibly be worth copying; also avoids films with subtitles.) "

Young musicians fill orchestra's ranksSt. Patrick's Day brings a family concert to the Playhouse.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"Audiences at the Bainbridge Orchestra concerts March 17-18 may not recognize the musical ensemble.The orchestra has 12 new members, all under the age of 18. We now have unprecedented numbers of young musicians playing, Jim Quitslund, coordinator of Bainbridge Performing Arts Classical Music Program said. This is a wonderful trend.Now, the orchestra's age range is from junior high to the late 80s, director Kathleen Macferran said. "

Settling down among restless AmericansEssayist Scott Sanders hopes we all find our own sense of place.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home.Americans may pay the sentiment lip service, but Scott Russell Sanders believes that the Stephen Foster lyrics do not resonate as they might with the people he calls this nation of restless movers.Novelist/essayist Sanders, whose down-to-earth demeanor belies a distinguished resume, stresses the importance of staying put when he lectures on The Character of Community March 16 at the Playhouse. "

Journalist Walt Woodward dies at age 91Two memorial services are slated for March 24.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"Walter C. Walt Woodward, Jr., age 91, award-winning journalist who with his late wife Mildred edited and published the Bainbridge Review during the years before and after World War II, died March 13 on Bainbridge Island. Two memorial services are set for March 24, at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church and at Woodward Middle School. Times for those services have not been set; information will appear in the Saturday Review. "

Wetlands regs revisitedThe council hopes to restrict development in sensitive areas.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"The city council will take another shot at curtailing development near island wetlands, after a recent ordinance was declared void.One of three boards that administers the state's Growth Management Act struck down the wetlands ordinance in February, citing the city's failure to provide proper notice of the change. "

"Readin', writin' and RotariansThe club hopes to help children'slanguage skills."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

Toddlers who are read to in the right way develop significantly better language skills at an earlier age than other tots.A Bainbridge Island psychologist is teaming with the Rotary Club to spread the word as wide as possible.

Journalist Walt Woodward dies at age 91

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"Walter C. Walt Woodward, Jr., age 91, award-winning journalist who with his late wife Mildred edited and published the Bainbridge Review during the years before and after World War II, died March 13 on Bainbridge Island.Two memorial services are set for March 24, at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church and at Woodward Middle School. Times for those services have not been set; information will appear in the Saturday Review. "

Two months of nothing for ferries

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"The good news: You'll still be able to enjoy a beer or a glass of wine aboard the ferry.The bad news: We're not sure there's still going to be a ferry, as Thursday's day of reckoning came and went for legislative bills hoping to clear committee and get a hearing before the full chambers.By our count, no fewer than 21 pieces of ferry-related legislation were introduced as the session got under way in January. Most had little or nothing to do with ferry funding, dealing instead with such non-issues as banning alcohol sales aboard the boats; allowing private vendors to sell ferry tickets; compensating ferry and highway workers who are assaulted by motorists; allowing ferry terminal workers to send to the back of the queue any motorists who block driveways or try to cut in line (don't they already do that?) "

"Pot operation bustedA basement greenhouse included sophisticated lights, vents and security."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"More than 180 marijuana plants, some 4-5-feet in height, were seized in a raid on a south Bainbridge home Friday morning.A 44-year-old male resident was arrested, shutting down what police called a highly sophisticated growing operation.It's a major, major bust, Bainbridge Police Chief Bill Cooper said.The raid concluded a three-year investigation by the WestNet drug-enforcement team. "

"International educationStudents look to Japan, Germany."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"At two Bainbridge schools this month, students travel to foreign countries right in the classroom. In a five-week program planned by parents, Island School students are studying all aspects of Japanese culture. And at Sakai Intermediate School, Theresa Cosgrove's German language students celebrate Fasching - the German holiday that combines elements of mardi gras with Halloween - while other Parent Teacher Organization-sponsored language clubs offer a range of programs.We have cultural studies every spring to make sure these students are exposed to something beyond Bainbridge, Island School director Kelly Scribner said. "

"International educationStudents look to Japan, Germany."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:41PM

"At two Bainbridge schools this month, students travel to foreign countries right in the classroom. In a five-week program planned by parents, Island School students are studying all aspects of Japanese culture. And at Sakai Intermediate School, Theresa Cosgrove's German language students celebrate Fasching - the German holiday that combines elements of mardi gras with Halloween - while other Parent Teacher Organization-sponsored language clubs offer a range of programs.We have cultural studies every spring to make sure these students are exposed to something beyond Bainbridge, Island School director Kelly Scribner said. "

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