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Activists make cinema a civics lessonThe Conscientious Projector brings a political edge to the big screen.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"Film festivals traditionally tout the art of filmmaking.But Kitsap Citizen Action Network's first annual film and video festival, opening March 2 at two Bainbridge venues, promotes instant activism.We researched festivals nationwide, said Van Calvez, a film festival organizer. We didn't find another like this. It seems to be unique. At The Conscientious Projector: Films for the People and the Planet, filmgoers have the chance to process the powerful material they view, speaking with representatives of 20 local organizations, signing petitions, joining groups, forming talking circles - or expressing themselves creatively on an art wall. "

"Songs for healing, songs for funFirst Fridays shows celebrate Women's History Month."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"First Fridays at Island Center celebrates Women's History Month with two contrasting musical acts featuring women performers.The Bainbridge Park and Recreation show opens with folk singer Emily Groff, who performs traditional tunes from such venues as Ireland, Norway and Spain. "

The private alternativeIt's recruiting time for five non-profit island schools.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"A blond boy in a wheelchair rests his chin on the table, as other students put geometric shapes into various configurations. Connor Folse is beginning his day of observation at Hyla Middle School in Chris Johnson's 6th grade math class. After sitting in on art, humanities, science and Spanish, Folse will probably be closer to a decision about where he wants to be next fall.And before the day is out, school personnel will try to determine whether Folse will fit in.In a low-key interview, they will ask about his interests. They will ask why he wants to attend Hyla. Similar scenes are being played out at other island private schools this month. February - Private School Month by gubernatorial proclamation - is the start of the enrollment season. "

Can't afford 'em? Maybe you can

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"The island's private schools are not cheap. But the cost should not deter interested students, according to school administrators, because most offer enough financial aid to make the tuition manageable for any genuinely committed family.We don't want the tuition to be a reason that students can't come, said Island School principal Kelly Scribner. Our admission is need-blind. Some people might not come forward because of concern about the cost, but of those who do, we are able to help them.Most of the island's private schools use the School and Student Services group from Princeton, New Jersey, to assess family need. Based on financial information, SSS calculates how much the family can pay. The schools base their scholarship awards on that data. "

Tax dodging made easy for seniors

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"Land rich, cash poor.It's the old-timer's lament on Bainbridge Island. You bought a home here decades ago for $30,000, and today it's worth 10 times that. You're retired and living on a fixed income, but you don't want to sell out and move.You're a Bainbridge Islander, by gum, and you want to stay that way.The biggest challenge, though, is coming up with the cash when the assessor's annual Valentine's card - the property tax bill - shows up in the mail. "

The Glass Shard Game

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:39PM

"Children carrying cardboard trays cluster around shallow boxes of colored glass fragments laid out on a large table. There's a ruby red box, a cobalt blue box - every hue one can imagine - glowing with especial brilliance under fluorescent lights that seem to bleach other colors from the room. The clink of glass on glass as the youngsters select shards is mildly disorienting. What sounds like a dinner party is actually Sherry Chandler's 4th grade Ordway art class, working on a mural project with glass artists Diane Bonciolini and Greg Mesmer. "

"What's Maj. Hopkins' place in history?The park district may rename an historic park, citing wartime racism."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"The place, Camp Hopkins, recalls fond memories of harmony and community spirit among generations of island Boy and Girl Scouts.But the name is emblematic of hatred and divisiveness. Major M.J. Hopkins of Rolling Bay, a pioneer area scout leader, was also a ringleader in the short-lived movement to prevent Japanese-Americans who were interned during World War II from returning to the Bainbridge Island.I don't have any problems with the man, but I do with what he stood for, said Gerald Nakata, who was an island Boy Scout prior to his family's internment during the war.He didn't want us back.Now the Bainbridge Island Park District is considering changing the name of the 2.8-acre parcel on the northeast corner of Park Avenue and Dingley Road. "

"Fire chief Stickels to retireIt's north to Alaska, to run a business and be a volunteer."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"The biggest fire he battled here, he couldn't put out.But Bainbridge Fire Chief Kirk Stickels leaves his post well satisfied with far more property protected and lives saved.I've certainly enjoyed it, Stickels said of his eight years on the island. It's a great department to have served with. I'm proud to have been here.Chief of the Bainbridge Island Fire Department since 1993, Stickels will take early retirement at the end of March. "

"Bainbridge on the big screenThe Celluloid Bainbridge fest returns, showcasing local cinema."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"If an islander shoots it, they will show it.Movies made on Bainbridge or featuring islander talent will be arrayed for the Third Annual Celluloid Bainbridge Film Festival, Feb. 25 at Lynwood Theatre.Every year, kids come up to me and say, 'I hope you are going to have this next year, because I want to make a movie,' said Kathleen Thorne, program coordinator for the Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities Council. "

Ladder truck gets trial runThe fire board could authorize purchase next month.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"The last words one hears before shooting into the sky - in a basket, no less - are not reassuring:It's very rare that someone falls out.But the words come with a wry grin from the operator, and seconds later, one is at the end of a 100-foot ladder, at eye level with a nearby cell-phone tower and looking down on a good portion of the central island.Local firefighters took their own turns in the basket last week, as the department tried out a sophisticated ladder truck under consideration for purchase. "

A chance to examine our history

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Such were the times.At a public meeting in November 1944, as a group of Bainbridge residents debated the return of interned Japanese-Americans to this island, Lambert Schuyler of Winslow declared:The German is savage by command. (But) the Jap is a savage by instinct. They are criminal aborigines.It was not the only such comment uttered that day. Several folks - who, history would demonstrate, constituted a distinct minority - opposed the impending homecoming of islanders of Japanese ancestry as World War II wound down. Many couched their views by saying they were simply trying to prevent trouble, not start it - or by saying, I don't hate (Japanese-Americans), but I want them put by themselves.It was a dark time for an island torn by war, grief and in some quarters suspicion; many Japanese-Americans did return to Bainbridge from Manzanar and other concentration camps, and resumed their place in the community without incident. "

Punishment or forgiveness?The Interfaith Council hosts a forum on the justice system.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Josh, a Colville Indian, was 15 in 1999 when he accidentally shot and killed his sister at their Yakima home.They wouldn't let me see him. They kept him handcuffed, said Vicky, Josh's mother, describing her son's isolation for seven hours of police questioning. Josh's court-appointed attorney started his own investigation a week before trial. Josh was brought to court heavily sedated for suicide watch - and then was characterized for jurors as remorseless and unfeeling. He was sentenced to 15 years in a prison for adult offenders by a judge citing a policy of no tolerance for handguns.Issues raised by stories like Josh's - children tried as adults, civil liberties eroded through get tough on crime tactics, racial profiling and other problems of the criminal justice system - are the focus of a community forum, sponsored by the Bainbridge-North Kitsap Interfaith Council Feb. 24. "

"Spartans rally, earn state berth"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Emily Pierce sank four free throws in the final 17 seconds as the Spartans defeated sixth-ranked White River 58-54 and qualify as the No. 1 seed from District 3 for the 3A State tournament, which begins Wednesday at the Tacoma Dome. The Spartans were down by 12 points with less than five minutes to play but Pierce and Fab Rezayat powered the comeback. Rezayat drained a three-pointer with 50 seconds remaining to tie the score 54-54 as she scored 11 of her career-high18 points in the final five minutes. Pierce had 19 points to lead all scorers, while Alice Russell had 10 points and three blocked shots to celebrate her 15th birthday.Christine Schwager added eight and Morgan Zajonc chipped in three.The 16-team bracket will be announced Sunday afternoon. Information will appear here, or check www.wiaa.com. "

Rockefeller finally taking the helm

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Phil Rockefeller has taken the helm and set sail, and we're happy to bid him a smooth voyage.Readers will recall that two weeks ago in this space, we took the Bainbridge Democrat to task for failing to step up with a solid plan to save our ailing ferries. At that time, we chided Rockefeller and fellow Rep. Beverly Woods of Poulsbo for frittering away their days in Olympia haggling over the level of proposed ferry fare hikes, while the real issue - finding a new and stable funding source that will replenish the ferry system's depleted capital budget - languished for want of attention. "

Snow problem at allFun outpaces inconvenience as the island is blanketed in white.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"The snow was scenic, the moisture content badly needed, the inconvenience minimal.It was the perfect storm.The eight inches of wet snow that blanketed the island Thursday night and into Friday morning was the largest snow event since the thousand year slush of 1996-97 dropped two foot-deep loads on the area over a few days.This time, everyone was ready.We mobilized early and quickly, and stayed ahead of it, said Lance Newkirk, Bainbridge Island's assistant director of public works who took charge of the snow-removal efforts.City crews had plows on Highway 305 by 11:30 p.m. Thursday, Newkirk said, and worked all night on the highway lanes and the island's major arterials.Newkirk said the department had four large and two small plows on the job, the latter used for critical parking lots at the ferry terminal and city hall, and to clear some heavily traveled sidewalks. "

Rockefeller calls for new dept. of ferriesThe plan would rely on gas-tax funds.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Rep. Phil Rockefeller (D-Bainbridge Island) wants to save the ferry system by taking it out of the Department of Transportation and dedicating a portion of the gas tax to the system.And while the measure would adequately fund the current level of ferry service, the price tag - almost 30 percent of general state highway money - may make it a tough sell in the legislature.This part of the highway system is in dire straits, Rockefeller said, and the gas tax is quite literally the only source of money out there. "

School district girds for Woodward trial$5.4 million in repairs at issue.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"Although still hoping for a settlement, the Bainbridge Island School District is readying for a June trial over what it claims are defects in the construction of Woodward Middle School.School board member Bruce Weiland, an attorney, said the obstacle to resolving the dispute is that the various defendants can't agree on how to apportion fault.Not even the defendants try to say with a straight face that there is no problem with the school, Weiland said. "

Timber from the skyA century-old beam comes home for environmental education.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:38PM

"It's the tree that came home.A 92-foot beam, milled from the heart of a massive Puget Sound Douglas fir, was reclaimed from a Montana mine and flown from Seattle to Bainbridge Wednesday.This has got to be one of the biggest ones, Bainbridge historian Andrew Price said as the beam came to earth at the Puget Sound Environmental Learning Center. This is one beautiful, big timber from a tree hundreds of years old.Suspended under a hovering Boeing Vertol helicopter high above the PSELC site north of Blakely Harbor, the beam briefly resembled the 19th century nickname sawmill workers gave the big logs - Port Blakely toothpick.Perspective shifted rapidly to reveal the timber's true proportions as the helicopter descended, blowing dust and debris into the faces of hardhat-clad onlookers and depositing the 9,000-pound beam into place.Thirty-five people clambered onto the timber for a snapshot, in a moment that was a flashback to sepia-tinted photographs of loggers perched atop felled giants. The spirit animating this snapshot was conservation, not exploitation, however.We brought this tree back to Bainbridge as a model of the difference in forest use 100 years ago and today, PSELC Executive Director Thane Maynard said. We don't need to cut old growth - we can use smaller trees from sustainable forests and still build what we need. "

Skeletal proseBarbara Berger pares her feelings to the bone in a new essay.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"Barbara Berger is known for her children's books, but Bones, the essay she reads at Eagle Harbor Books Feb. 22, was written with adults in mind. Bones is published as part of a new anthology, Healing, with authors Anatole Broyard, Oliver Sacks and Tracy Kidder among others.Children's-book authors hate it when people say, 'When are you going to write a real book?' Berger said. I never did regard children's books as a training ground - but the truth is, during 20 years I have learned so much about writing, about story. "

Museum closes in on Winslow moveThe city may lease out the 'pet store property' at a nominal rate.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"The only thing standing between the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum and its long-time desire of moving downtown is history - specifically, several large, historic trees on the property to which it would move.Persuade the city council that museum operations will fit on the so-called pet store property without damaging the trees, and the city will offer that property to the society.The council is waiting for a definitive plan, said Mayor Dwight Sutton. It wants to make sure that the (historical) society can fit on the property, recognizing all factors, including future growth. "

School energy costs are soaringThe district's power bill could climb by 75 percent next year.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"The Bainbridge Island School District's energy bill for the coming year is likely to increase by 75 percent - skyrocketing from $510,000 to $892,500, officials say.In the five years I've been on the school board, a year (in which we) lost $300,000 was a very upsetting situation, school board member Bruce Weiland said. This is the third or fourth shoe to drop - and it's a boot. "

"MacArthur to leave Chamber, fly south"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"Chamber of Commerce executive director Jack MacArthur will retire at the end of September and begin splitting his time between Bainbridge Island and Palm Island, Fla. "

New ferry fare structure touted

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"Kitsap County Commissioner Tim Botkin wants to raise most ferry fares even higher than the 20 percent increase already proposed, to moderate increases in passenger-only fares.And even though the plan would cost Bainbridge riders extra money, it is finding support among some island officials, who think preserving and expanding the passenger-only system has substantial long-range benefits.Right now it sounds like we're punishing ourselves, said Bainbridge Island Mayor Dwight Sutton. But this plan could put money down towards service to Kingston and Southworth. The Tariff Policy Committee chaired by islander Alice Tawresey had recommended increasing ferry fares to the point that 80 percent of ferry operating costs are recovered from the fare payers at the end of six years, up from the current 62 percent. "

Take a boat trip for the ferry system

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"How's this for a shakeup in your morning commute? Bainbridge Islanders can show support for the ferry system by taking part in a sail-in to the state Legislature, Feb. 22.On that day, a boatload of ferry backers will sail from Bremerton to Olympia on a chartered fast-ferry-type vessel for a noon rally at the state capitol, with a round of afternoon of meetings with legislators also slated. The group will include commuters, business people, local elected officials - anyone with a stake in the viability of our cross-sound highway and a day to spare. "

Depression-era 'Can't Take It' at BPATwo cast members return for their encore 15 years later.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:37PM

"Seventeen people are gathered around a large table, talking and gesticulating.A tall, red-headed man downstage right listens, one arm folded across his waist, chin pensively cradled in the other hand. Let's try that full voice - you need to holler your lines, he says at last.Cast and crew of You Can't Take it With You, the Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman comedy opening at Bainbridge Performing Arts (BPA) this week, are in the third hour of the cue-to-cue, the rehearsal that blends technical elements of the play with the acting. The company around the table disappear into the wings momentarily and reassemble onstage to try again, and again. "

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