Story Archives

Archive Results — 21076 thru 21100 of about 26100 items

Recycle your old art through BAC

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

She started by looking in her own closets and corners. “It was there,” Susan Levy said, “under the bed, behind the desk. I had it. We all have it – the art we’ve outgrown.”

Irish ladies of the dance

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

To play a colleen, Darby Ann Cahill had to brush up on her brogue. When the Bainbridge High School senior landed the part as Chrissie Mundy, youngest of five Irish sisters featured in the current BPA production, “Dancing at Lughnasa,” director Todd Jamieson put words in her mouth straightaway.

Irish eyes weren’t always smiling

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Irish journalist Nuala O’Faolain didn’t set out to write a memoir. But as she penned the introduction to a collection of her newspaper columns, the piece took an unlooked-for autobiographical turn. That introduction became the New York Times best seller, “Are You Somebody? The Accidental Memoir of a Dublin Woman,” from which O’Faolain reads Monday to launch this year’s “Kitsap Reads” series.

Hats off to Harry

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Garrett Bennett and Ann Wilkinson came home to make a movie – a movie about coming home. The result, “Farewell to Harry,” is featured in a special screening this weekend at the island’s annual film festival, “Celluloid Bainbridge.” Writer/director Bennett and co-producer Wilkinson hadn’t seen each other since graduating from Bainbridge High School in the early 1980s. But when Bennett told her about the project, Wilkinson moved back from New York, where she had been acting and writing.

The new Bronze Age

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Roy Peratrovich’s home resembles a nature preserve. Otters twist through seaweed; bears loll in the sun; eagles perch on branches and killer whales leap – all worked in clay by the artist and then cast in bronze.

Brown leads viewers on Underground tour

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Karol Brown invites her audience to “get on board” the famed Underground Railroad Feb 9. In a one-woman dramatization for the “Inquiring Minds” series, Brown portrays Harriet Tubman, who led hundreds of slaves to freedom.

Lloyd Jones brings the Beaver State blues

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Four Swallows restaurateur Mike Sharp always knew where to find a busboy or dishwasher. “I’d go to the bulletin board up at Helpline,” Sharp said. “They’ve helped a lot of local restaurants out that way – and lots of young kids have gotten their first job. I wanted to pay Helpline back.”

Returning Ulysses’ gaze

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Although they depict faraway places, the photographs in “The Cretan Glance” are the opposite of travel pictures. Rather than the recording transient impressions, the new exhibit in the Playhouse lobby depicts the beloved home photographer Terry Moyemont discovered in 1989.

Not just pickin’ and grinnin’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

Alive and Well is just that – and playing Feb. 1 at Island Center Hall for the First Fridays series. The pick-up band that will play back-up for guitarist Larry Dewey is a floating group of friends who support each other musically.

Her spiritual quest spread by word of Net

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:57PM

After Oriah Mountain Dreamer penned “The Invitation,” she received RSVPs from all over the world. Mountain Dreamer, who will read from two books based on that first poem on Jan. 30, became a publishing phenomenon when her writing criss-crossed the world via the Internet.

Playin’ it by ear

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

It was biologist Cindy Horning’s study of singing birds that led her to choose a “Suzuki method” piano teacher for her daughter. The Suzuki theory of training a child’s ear seemed to parallel what Horning, a researcher at the University of Washington, had observed about how birds acquire song.

Magic for the Muggle-minded

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

If you’ve been dreaming of a way to transmogrify that stack of books by the bed into one managable volume, or an enchanted carry-on that won’t burst bearing the burden of all the travel guides you lugged to your last vacation...

Art for money’s sake

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Pack up the Persian carpet. Blow the dust off the scrimshaw that might be genuine. Wrap the maybe-Arts-and-Crafts vase in bubble wrap. Then come into Winslow for Appraisal Day, Jan. 26.

Social change? Affirmative

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Locally based, globally aware “YES!” magazine recently received a big affirmative, winning the 2001 Utne Reader Alternative Press Award in the category of Cultural/ Social coverage.

Williamson and Quitslund draw in the crowds with Schumann’s Loss lieder

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Baritone David Williamson sings a poignant farewell to Puget Sound in a performance that opens with songs by C.P.E. Bach, Mozart and Schubert, and concludes with Schumann’s beautiful “Dichterliebe” (“A Poet’s Love”), 16 songs set to Heine’s great love poems.

An archival collection

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

When Lee Makovich was 10 years old, his father gave him a handful of historical maritime photographs and told him to take care of them. Makovich honored his father’s wish so well, that he built a 3,000 photograph collection around that original gift.

MLK Day celebration in song

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Those who heard the “surround sound” performance by the 200-voice MLK Jr. Memorial Choir last year know that when director Patrinell Wright dubbed the event Sing Out!, she named the event well.

What is art? At BAC, it’s elementary

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Rainbow colors of several hundred artworks splash across Bainbridge Arts and Crafts walls this month. The biennial exhibit of elementary art gathers paintings, sculpture, prints and drawings from eight island public and private schools.

Satterwhite shows work at library

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Dinah Satterwhite’s photographs, now on display at the library, bring the Northwest landscape indoors. Familiar scenes like the Grand Forest and the library’s Japanese garden have been transformed by her technique. Sometimes this involves hand-tinting the images; most recently, it has meant shooting with infrared film.

Open Sesame!

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Entering M.J. Linford’s studio is like stepping into a book – a rather unusual book. There are written fragments, like the cryptic list on a bulletin board: Stains on the soul; emotional geography; drowning in a sanican; stealing your child. There are also visual elements – jars of feathers, pencils, plastic boxes full of hand tools and iconic-looking artifacts of shells, wood and bone. Text and image merge in Linford’s world, because she is a book artist – joining written and visual arts in formats loosely defined as a “book.”

BMA puts the ‘fun’ in fundraising

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

The ladies in red weren’t dancing that day, but they were certainly tapping their toes. For that matter, so were the ladies in green. As they gathered in a well-appointed Wing Point home for their December tea, the lively members of Bainbridge Music and Arts paid tribute to the season – and their long-standing commitment to the island’s young talent.

Through a poet's eyes

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:56PM

Linda Bierds gleans poems from paintings in “The Seconds,” a collection of new works inspired by visual images.

Stylized study in color, light

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:55PM

The visitor to Ray Styles’ studio might be attracted to the bright colors of his art supplies, as well as to his work. The hundreds of sticks of compressed pigment in neat rows on a studio table are this self-styled Impressionist’s medium for the luminous pastel landscapes on view at Bistro Pleasant Beach.

Island arts in full swing in 2001

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:55PM

2001 was a year of arts and humanities “firsts” on Bainbridge, as 13 programs and series debuted. Bainbridge youth benefited from several new arts initiatives and took their talent across the globe. And when global events were felt close to home, panel discussions and a lecture series opened conversation about America and Islam.

In the wake of Sept. 11, local dramatists look for enlightenment

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 8:55PM

In the wake of Sept. 11, Palestinian American Hanna Eady was left frightened and isolated in his Bainbridge home. “I was hiding because I was, like everyone, in shock,” Eady said. “But I was also a little scared. I knew what had happened here to the Japanese in World War II. And I come from a country where they can come to your house and pull you out without a reason.”

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