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Archive Results — 20601 thru 20625 of about 23150 items

Citizen panel touts creation of ethics board

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

A citizen committee this week recommended the creation of a formal code of ethics for the city, as well as a five-person ethics board with the power to subpoena witnesses and documents. The recommendation follows a year of study by an advisory committee comprised of Charles Schimd, longtime community activist; Jim O’Connor, former King County hearing examiner; and Bob Schoonmaker, owner of the Chandlery. The recommendations were “not motivated by members of our committee, or those to whom we spoke, by specific complaints of (un)ethical behaivior,” Schmid said, writing for the committee in an introductory report.

Fire Dept. tax hike goes up in smoke

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The 10 percent increase fails to attract voters in low turnout Tuesday.
Voters appeared to defeat a property tax levy “lid lift” try by the Bainbridge Island Fire Department in a special ballot Tuesday. Unofficial final returns Friday showed 3,646 “no” votes, or 51.2 percent, against 3,475 “yes” votes, or 48.8 percent. Voter turnout was under 50 percent, with an unknown number of stray ballots yet to be counted. Fire officials held out hope that a late-week count of outstanding mail ballots would turn the election in their favor, but it did not gain ground on the deficit that emerged in first returns Tuesday.

Herring deaths a mystery

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Researchers are puzzled by a high mortality rate among egg samples in a spawning ground at Hidden Cove.
Hidden Cove has a real whodunit – herring eggs laid there are dying. Although signs point to a toxic compound as the cause, embryologists with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife haven’t seen this type of mortality before. “(We’re) seeing cell death that isn’t consistent with the published literature,” said Jim West, a research scientist with Fish and Wildlife. Studies show that herring egg mortality in Hidden Cove is unusually high and chronic, yet also unpredictable. While some data suggest toxic compounds from oil – polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs – found in the water could be the cause, not all the evidence supports that conclusion, and more targeted research is needed, West says.

Fire levy going down to defeat

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Voters appeared to defeat a property tax levy “lid lift” try by the Bainbridge Island Fire Department in a special ballot Tuesday. Unofficial final returns Friday showed 3,646 “no” votes, or 51.2 percent, against 3,475 “yes” votes, or 48.8 percent. Voter turnout was under 50 percent, with an unknown number of stray ballots yet to be counted.

Znetix trio found guilty -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Three stock salesman were found guilty in federal court Monday of multiple felonies, after a seven-week trial stemming from the Znetix/Health Maintenance Centers securities scam. Convicted before the Seattle bench of Judge Marcia Pechman were Larry L. Beaman, 62, of Ridgefield, Wash., Michael J. Culp, 33, of Bothell, and Harvey W. Kuiken, 52, of Newcastle. A jury returned convictions on a total of 52 felony counts, including securities fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy and money laundering.

BPA looking back at those high school years

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Then as now, teen concerns remain the same, Fogell believes.
Adults and teens may not be able to “walk in each others’ moccasins” - but a Bainbridge Performing Arts workshop performance invites them to try on the footwear for an evening. Created by BPA theater school director Steven Fogell, the E.Y.E.S. Project (Emplowering Youth, Enlightening Society) seeks to span the generation gap with a presentation of tales of high school years submitted by current students and graduates. Fogell invites submission of stories for inclusion in the next August’s performance, when graduates’ stories will be read by young people, and youth tales will find adult readers. “I’m starting to receive peoples’ writings,” Fogell said. “It’s very exciting.”

He’s at home in the kitchen

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Fourteen-year-old Spencer Coplan is already an award-winning chef.
The head chef, dressed in kitchen whites, dips a spoon into a saucepan to taste and evaluate the flavor. It’s a scene that plays out in a hundred Puget Sound restaurants every day. But this taste test is unique because the chef is West Sound Academy eighth grader Spencer Coplan – already such an accomplished culinary artist at age 14, that the young islander’s original recipe took first place in a national contest last month.

Moving up by moving away

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A new study reveals the exodus of middle- and low-income families.
Bainbridge is losing its wage earners. Not at work, but at home. A report by the Mayor’s Affordable Housing Task Force, to be presented at City Hall this evening at 6 p.m., says island households making $35,000 or less annually declined 40.5 percent from 1994 to 2003. Of residents in the 18-34 age group, “there has been a significant decline,” the report says. And it is a lack of affordable housing that’s driving moderate- and low-income families off the island – as illustrated by Madeline Johnson and her two children who wanted to stay, but could not. “At one point it was a hard decision, and at one point it was an easy decision,” said Johnson, leaving Bainbridge to take advantage of a self-help housing program in Poulsbo. “I’m at least grateful not to be moving five states away.”

City may buy 49-acre woodland by Gazzam

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The serene Peters property is eyed with $1.01 million in open space funding.
Olemara Peters has some strong views about land. One is that it belongs to itself – the people on it are secondary. But someone has to hold title, and nearly half the Peters family holdings near Gazzam Lake may soon come under public ownership. An agreement signed this week would see the public purchase of some 49 acres of forestland for $1.01 million, under the city’s open space preservation program. “I’m disconcerted by what I see going on, and I definitely want it not to go on here,” said Peters, a Redmond resident whose paternal family ties to Bainbridge go back generations. “My mother grew up partly among Native Americans in Missouri and Oklahoma, with mentors who I think taught her the things I’ve gotten the benefit from,” she said. “And I know my thought of the land belonging to itself comes from long before white folks got here and started paving it all.”

Briggs picked to head city -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

As Bainbridge Island was looking into Mary Jo Briggs, Mary Jo Briggs was looking into Bainbridge Island. Each, it turns out, liked what they saw. “My sources were many when I was investigating the community, and it has had a somewhat tumultuous past as far as competing interests and different ideas about the direction Bainbridge should go,” said Briggs, confirmed this week as the city’s next administrator. “What I find refreshing is, I perceive now a universal commitment between the mayor and council to moving the city forward in a positive way.

Searching for a sense of place

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

His pursuit of America’s shared narrative takes Egan on a yearly, 40,000-mile trek.
For Timothy Egan, the quintessential American road trip is a search for “place,” for geography overlaid with a shared apprehension of the historical and psychological terrain. Egan, a Seattle author who is a national reporter for the New York Times, brings Puget Sound landscapes into focus and turns an incisive eye on the larger West in works that include “The Good Rain: Across Time and Terrain in the Pacific Northwest” (1990); “Breaking Blue” (1992); and “Lasso the Wind: Away to the New West” (1999).

Merchants lobby for Ericksen, Hildebrand connection

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A petition drive on store counters reaps 400 signatures.
In past years, when the question of joining Ericksen Avenue and Hildebrand Lane has come up, officials have usually heard from one constituency: Ericksen residents saying “no.” Now they’re hearing from another: Hildebrand merchants and customers saying “yes.” The dynamic between residential and commercial interests came into relief this week, when the City Council was presented with petitions bearing some 400 signatures, calling for a formal connection between the two Winslow streets. Signatures were primarily gathered on the counters of Hildebrand businesses. “There is a need we’ve heard, to deal with this pretty quickly,” said Kevin Dwyer, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce, which sponsored the petition.

Economic diversity is on the wane

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A report says the island is getting more affluent, housing choices disappearing.
After waiting nine years, Madeline Johnson is finally getting an affordable home of her own – by moving off-island. “It’s like moving my life,” Johnson said. “(But) if I didn’t, I wouldn’t have this home.” Johnson’s situation reflects the findings of a just-released report from the mayor’s 2004 Affordable Housing Task Force, which found that affordable housing programs established by the city in 1997 have not been effective. The report will be presented at a special Affordable Housing Forum at City Hall at 6 p.m. May 19.

Learning about each other

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The Homework Club helps island Native American students.
Adaline Rapada couldn’t have a more rapt audience. As the sixth-grader reads from her Scholastic Magazine article about the upcoming Olympic games in Athens, Greece, Bainbridge High School junior John Emau kneels on the Ordway library floor next to her chair and listens attentively. “Greece will face many challenges when Olympic games return home this summer, but as the originator of the games, Greece has unbeatable...qualifications,” Rapada reads with ease, hesitating only when she comes to the last word.

House egged? Call Poulsbo PD -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The arrest of three Poulsbo-area teens on vandalism charges this week has the Poulsbo Police Department searching for more victims, including those on Bainbridge Island. The boys, all age 17, admitted May 5 to egging cars, street signs and mailboxes during several sprees over the last two weeks. In total, about 300 eggs – 25 dozen – were thrown in neighborhoods around North Kitsap High School and on Bainbridge.

Those yellow school buses go green

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Retrofitting to trap particulates, burn cleaner fuel means less noxious exhaust.
One ride to school, hold the exhaust. School bus emissions have gotten cleaner, through a recently completed retrofit of some Bainbridge Island School District vehicles using cleaner-burning fuel. “You don’t see the black stuff (in the exhaust),” Bainbridge school bus driver Bill “Mr. Bill” Ehrhardt said. “Just mostly transparent, and it doesn’t smell as bad. It’s like walking behind a regular car – smells better than unleaded gas.”

The joy of the ‘Superstar’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

BHS theater brings the 1960s musical ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ to the BPA stage.
Jesus kneels before Pontius Pilate, hands cinched together, head crowned with thorns. While the crowd urges Pilate to crucify him, the Roman ruler of Judea questions the religious rebel. “What do you want, Jesus, tell me,” Pilate, played by BHS senior Jenny Black says, “...Why do you not speak when I have your life in my hands?” Knowing the end of the story doesn’t lessen the drama of moment, as the scene builds to the crucifixion, the climax of “Jesus Christ Superstar,” opening here May 13.

Mayor to nominate manager of choice

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Kordonowy will proffer Mary Jo Briggs at tonight’s council meeting.
Mayor Darlene Kordonowy is poised to fill her second senior management position in as many weeks. At tonight’s City Council meeting, Kordonowy will formally nominate Mary Jo Briggs as the city’s next administrator. The appointment follows council confirmation two weeks ago of Matt Haney as police chief. Briggs currently serves as city administrator for Fairview, Ore., a fast-growing suburb on Portland’s east side. The city of 9,000 near the Columbia River has an annual budget of $20 million. She emerged as one of two favorites, after interviews of four finalists by panels of citizens, city staff and council members; following those sessions, Kordonowy then met with Briggs twice individually.

Top fiddle at last

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

BMA hands out music scholarships.
Try, try again is the mantra of every musician, and Trubee Davison’s third try paid off. The young violinist took first place in Bainbridge Music and Arts’ string competition, after finishing second the last two years. “I was really excited,” said Davison, a junior at Bainbridge High School. “Music and Arts is a really good experience to compete and get input from judges. That’s more important (than winning).”

Historic preservation board set

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Members will review nominees for a local register of historic homes.
Historic preservation is in Bainbridge’s future. A new, seven-member Bainbridge Island Historic Preservation Commission will promote the retention of older homes and structures through tax breaks and education. “History is what makes a place special,” said Sarah Lee, commission chair. “It makes you feel attached to, or part of what was there before.” The group met for the first time on Tuesday. Member Linda Costello, an architect frequently involved with historic preservation efforts, says commissioners were unanimous in their goal. “We all agreed that we wanted to be positive,” Costello said. “A lot of people are afraid of ‘preservation,’ thinking they will be fined, penalized or guilt-tripped. I hope (homeowners) will see the register as a benefit.”

Five earn park grants –– News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Five local organizations have received more than $30,000 in funding from the Bainbridge Island Parks Foundation. The awards “will enhance recreational opportunities of Bainbridge Island citizens,” park planner Perry Barrett said. “These outstanding projects stand testament to the imagination, hard work and community consensus necessary to take a dream to fruition,” he said.

Ranger Gawlik to the rescue

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Junior Girl Scout earns Bronze Award for promoting parks.
Taylor Gawlik combined a long-time family pursuit with a gift for public speaking to earn the Bronze Award, the Junior Girl Scouts’ highest achievement. Gawlik, a Sakai fifth-grader and a scout in Susie Cook’s Troop 911, has addressed groups ranging from the Boy Scouts to Bainbridge firefighters to enlist volunteers for state parks here – a community service Gawlik and her family have long performed.

Burglar smashes library artwork, steals donations

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

A 16-year-old island boy was arrested Wed­nes­­day, police say.
A burglar smashed his way into the Bainbridge Library Tuesday night, then damaged a unique work of art to steal cash contributions made to the library. Police arrested a 16-year-old male suspect Wednesday afternoon, shortly after a witness came forward and linked him to the crime, De­tective Scott An-der­son said. The youth remained in custody at the Kitsap juvenile facility Thursday. Dam­aged in the break-in was a 6-foot-tall, papier maché giraffe just inside the li­brary en­trance.

Churches unite ‘on the side of love’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Gay marriage is explored in a forum by two ‘affirming’ congregations.
Shay Reed and his partner Warren had been together for nearly a decade, when they learned last February that gay men and lesbian women in San Francisco were being married, followed, within weeks, by same-sex couples in Oregon’s Multnomah County. The long-inaccessible state-sanctioned union was suddenly a real possibility for the committed couple, North Kitsap residents who belong to Bainbridge’s Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and who are raising a son together.

No worries, but lots to fret about

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Young singer/songwriter has been strumming since age 8.
At a time in life when many teens struggle for self-definition, Lana McMullen knows she’s on the road to her future. A freshman at Bainbridge High School, McMullen sings her original compositions at the park district’s First Fridays concert on May 7, accompanying herself on guitar. “I’ve always really loved music since I was really little,” McMullen said. “And then I was really influenced by country music when I was growing up, because Shania Twain played the guitar and I was obsessed with her.”

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