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‘Fahrenheit’ finds eager audience

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Controversial film breaks records at the Lynwood.
It’s a fact: filmmaker Michael Moore is a bigger draw than invading space aliens on Bainbridge. “We did three times the box office of ‘Men In Black’ or ‘Independence Day’ (on opening weekend),” said TJ Faddis, manager of the Historic Lynwood Theatre, of Moore’s documentary “Fahrenheit 9/11,” which opened at the theater Friday. “I thought it would build,” she said. “We’re kind of standing here with our mouths agape.” Faddis estimates about 2,800 Lynwood patrons watched “Fahrenheit 9/11” over the three-day weekend – surpassing every record she’s seen set in her 20 years with the theater. The film about the Bush administration’s reaction to the events of Sept. 11, 2001, saw the Lynwood’s midday showings sell out for the first time. Of the 12 weekend showings, seven were sold out.

Medina to lead wildlife shelter -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Island Wildlife Shelter at Bloedel Reserve has named Kol Medina, a Bainbridge Island attorney specializing in environmental law, as the shelter’s new half-time executive director. Medina, a Stanford University Law School graduate, has served on the board of directors for the shelter for three years, and was its vice president before resigning to become executive director. He will be in charge of administration and development, while Sandra Fletcher continues to serve as director of wildlife rehabilitation, caring for the wild creatures brought to the shelter.

Forging new and better trails

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Experts will teach volunteers how to beat the best forest path.
Take acres of open space and some community volunteers, add a professionally sponsored workshop, and the result could be miles and miles of new island trails. The Subaru/International Moun­tain Bike Association’s trail care crew comes to Bainbridge Island to give a free, two-day workshop on building sustainable trails July 10-11, commencing with a slideshow July 8. “We have this coalescence of open space coming online – either for transportation connections or recreational opportunities, (and) we have a great volunteer base on the island,” said John Grinter, a member of the park district’s trails advisory committee. “What this will do is teach us how to build (trails) properly the first time, and hopefully reduce taxpayer expense.”

Fischer named planning czar for downtown

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The community design expert will lead a 75-member ‘Congress.’
Landscape architect and community design specialist Sandy Fischer will serve as manager for the Winslow Tomorrow downtown planning project. Her selection was announced Tuesday by Mayor Darlene Kordonowy, after a weeks-long review process that included top city officials, citizens and council members. A relatively new island resident, Fischer brings expertise from her 20 years as principal of Fischer and Associates, a Montana-based planning and landscape architecture firm. “It’s great to have someone who’s somewhat familiar with the community, but not entrenched in any of the solutions we’ve been talking about,” Kordonowy said.

Man stabbed during party -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Fistfights flowed and a stabbing followed at a gathering of young people at a Baker Hill residence early Wednesday morning. The incident left 18-year-old Nicholas Duran of Bainbridge Island hospitalized with a severe laceration to his abdomen and other wounds, Bainbridge Police Detective Scott Anderson said. The suspect, William “Liam” Dipert, age 23, of Bainbridge Island, was booked into Kitsap County Jail on suspicion of first degree assault, Anderson said.

Party season is here - do parents care?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Just Know Coalition vows to carry its anti-drug message forward.
Youth party season is in full swing, a reminder that summer’s here. This year is different in at least one respect; Just Know, a group formed last fall to reduce risky behavior among youth is hanging in, determined to meet the challenge of reducing teen substance abuse on Bainbridge. “I’ve never sat on a committee that had more energy and focus,” said Bainbridge School Board President Bruce Weiland, who worked with the group of parents, educators, medical professionals, fire and police, arts organizations, therapists, business leaders and others. “It’s been an exciting year.”

The berry that loved Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Whatever happened to the tasty Marshall strawberry?
By all accounts, the Marshall strawberry was the tastiest, juiciest strawberry around. Hundreds of acres of the Marshall variety once covered Bain­bridge, and the island was largely known for the berry. “Marshalls are probably the only strawberry to me that tasted good,” said Art Koura, who was born in 1918 and remembers picking berries on his parents’ farm. “Marshalls had a very meaty heart, and tender skin.” By contrast, Koura says, today’s strawberries are so hard “you could play marbles with them.” Yet today, the Marshall strawberry is effectively gone; delicate and less productive, it declined in the face of more commercially viable varieties.

WSF tightening vessel security

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Plans for a new pedestrian access are scuttled, upsetting trails advocates.
Tighter security measures are kicking in aboard Washington State Ferries and at terminals, officials said this week. A pack of explosives-sniffing dogs is being trained and deployed, more state troopers will be seen on vessels, and even riders themselves are being enlisted in the cause – asked to be on the lookout for suspicious activity. “It makes sense,” said Pat Patterson, WSF spokeswoman. “There are a lot of folks who are your readers who ride those boats five days a week or more, and know when something isn’t quite right.” The changes were announced at a press conference Monday, which included a statement by WSF Director Mike Thorne.

Stuff and nonsense

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The 44th annual Rotary Auction promises a little bit of everything this Saturday.
Like the storm surge of “The Day After Tomorrow” – a wall of water that buried Manhattan in the recent blockbuster film – the growing stream of stuff arriving curbside threatens to engulf Woodward Middle School. Donations for the Rotary Auction and Rummage Sale, to be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 26, are being disgorged at a rate that would bring the mound of bicycles and backpacks, golf bags and gizmos level with the roof – if the piles weren’t simultaneously whittled away by volunteers who lug the goods off in shopping carts, wheelbarrows, handcarts and a red wagon. “It’s absolutely fantastic that so many people contribute,” said Rotarian Jim Chapel, this year’s event chair. “We have 600 volunteers sorting donations into 33 departments.” The compendium of articles is so exhaustive that a Stone Age time-traveler dropped onto the site could do one-stop shopping for the accoutrements to contemporary life – and then some.

There's a bear in the woods

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Adam Morrow went looking for a bear, and had a surprise encounter Saturday evening. Morrow was in his car with his niece and nephew, following up on a bear sighting near Sunrise Drive, when he heard two youngsters screaming – and saw them running away from a bear that was bounding across an open field. “I just yelled, ‘Come jump in the car!’” Morrow said. “They dove right into the car. They were shaken up and shaking.”

Make your favorite Martian, no strings attached

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Artists Hall and Fraga cook up an alien invasion for Independence Day.
Giant Martians are landing here this summer. A fleet of 10-by-20-foot paper mâché puppets is being crafted to march in next month’s Fourth of July parade. The alien invasion is the brainchild of island animator Wendy Hall and gallery owner/artist Kathe Fraga, who invite islanders to join in making the puppets at informal workshops held at Oil and Water, the new art supply store across from the Pavilion. “The thing about these (puppets) is you can’t believe it ‘til you see it,” Hall said. “You’re looking at all this paper mâché and fabric and poles lying around, but when you stand that puppet up and start to move it around, it becomes real.”

Marine center in bad straits -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Poulsbo Marine Science Center is launching a major fund and membership drive, under the theme “We Let Our Friends In For Free,” to run through this summer. For its marine environmental programs to continue, the center needs to expand its membership base, especially in light of financial shortfalls experienced by the educational, nonprofit institution. Anyone joining at the $45 level receives 18 months of free admission to the center and many of its programs, for the entire family, as well as a CD-ROM about local marine life. Those joining at the $60 level also receive a copy of the new Seattle Aquarium DVD, “Life on the Edge.”

Priced out of house and home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Island property is out of reach of low-to-middle incomes, says task force.
A salary of $56,088 a year seems decent – until you want to buy a house on Bainbridge Island. On Bainbridge, that salary is 80 percent of the community’s median income – $70,110 – and right on the line between low and moderate income as defined by federal housing standards. That means a firefighter or teacher can afford to buy a house if it’s in the $129,000 to $202,000 range; “middle income” small business owners and loan officers making $67,305 to $84,132 could afford a house costing $242,000 to $303,000.

Park residents chase destiny

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

The mobile home park could be purchased by a nonprofit cooperative.
Residents of the Islander Mobile Home Park hope they have their destiny in their own hands. Their tenants association hopes to work with a California-based company to form a nonprofit in order to purchase the 6.4-acre park just north of City Hall in Winslow for $5.5 million. Part of the land would be purchased by local developer Kelly Samson, for redevelopment as market-rate housing; the remaining park would include around 50 mobile homes. For resident Laura Barnard, the proposal means “independence.”

Different folks, same strokes

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Growing club promotes rowing as a sport for all ages and skills.
Downtown Winslow is deserted at dawn, but laughter and chatter filter up from Waterfront Park. Quartets of women balancing heavy rowing shells on their shoulders walk to the water’s edge. Spring rain or autumn darkness notwithstanding, the masters women’s team of the Bainbridge Island Rowing Club is out on the water at 5 a.m. at least three days a week from February to November. “For that hour and a half, you think of nothing else – life’s worries are just not there,” rower Linda Desrosiers said. “I can’t think of anything (other) than focusing on the next stroke.”

Waking up a community to the realities of war

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Surveying her beliefs prompted a young islander to take action.
Mary Vittum went to Safeway to buy groceries, and came home with a shopping list of worthy causes. Vittum, who graduated from Bainbridge’s Strawberry Hill Alternative High School in 1999, was approached by Sakai Intermediate School sixth-graders surveying Safeway customers. “They asked me whole bunch of questions about how I felt about global warming,” Vittum said. “I answered all their questions, and at the end there was an ‘A, B or C’ about what I would do to help improve the situation. “I chose ‘drive a more fuel-efficient car’ – and then I got into my SUV and drove home and thought ‘wow, you’re a hypocrite.’”

Appleton kicks off run -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Sherry Appleton kicks off her run for the state House of Representatives, 6-8 p.m. June 24 at the Suquamish Tribal Center, 15838 Sandy Hook Road in Poulsbo. Appleton is vying for the 23rd District position being vacated by fellow Democrat Phil Rockefeller. Rockefeller will be on hand to support Appleton’s candidacy, along with retiring state Sen. Betti Sheldon, Kitsap County Commissioner Chris Endresen, and state Speaker of the House, Frank Chopp.

Putting good teeth in young smiles

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

An island nonprofit group promotes oral hygiene for kids.
Kate Mills has cleaned children’s teeth on stages, in classrooms, and even hallways. This summer, the registered dental hygienist is moving into a dental office to clean adult teeth. Mills and hygienist Nan Hawkes, make up Washington State Smile Partners, providing school-based preventive dental care and education to underserved, low-income children in Kitsap and King counties. The seeds for WSSP were planted when Mills worked in a school-based dental program in Sacramento, Calif., and saw a huge number of people in dental need: children, parents and grandparents. “It was the first time I felt such passion in what I do, because it makes a difference,” Mills said. “A lot of kids need (dental care) desperately.”

Crash course in road woes

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

t Traffic citations are up, but so are accidents on island roadways.
It’s Bainbridge Island’s most heavily traveled roadway, and State Route 305 also sees the most automobile collisions. From 2001 through the first quarter of this year, eight of the island’s top 11 accident locations were at highway intersections or on SR-305 itself, a new review of traffic data by Bainbridge Police shows. Heading the list is the 305/Day Road intersection, which saw 50 accidents during the 40-month period. Others trouble spots included 305/Madison (40), 305/High School (31) and 305/Sportsman Club (24). “It’s where we go continually,” Bainbridge Police Chief Haney said of the collision-heavy 305.

Park drive over the top

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

More than 3,300 signatures should push issue onto the Sept. 14 primary ballot.
Island voters are almost certain to decide the funding future of their park district on the Sept. 14 primary ballot. Park officials Tuesday delivered to the Kitsap County Elections Office petitions bearing the signatures of more than 3,300 local voters – many more than needed to put a proposed switch to a “metropolitan” park district before voters, backers say. “Our goal was 3,000, so yeah, it was a great outpouring of support,” said John Grinter, who coordinated the signature drive. “What do you say? We had a great team of volunteers.”

Digging the Delta roots of Howlin’ Wolf

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Island author reads from the first complete biography of the bluesman.
At 6 feet 3 inches, he was always the biggest man in the room. His appetites were huge, and he drew women like a magnet. But when he opened his mouth to sing, the music – not the mystique – was the point. Born in 1910, Chester Burnett, a Mississippi sharecropper’s son, became a Delta blues legend, singing with a ferocity that raised the hairs on the collective necks of the white Mississippians and earned him his nickname: Howlin’ Wolf.

Cops going on ped patrol -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Bainbridge Police and the Washington State Patrol will increase enforcement against jaywalkers around the ferry terminal, the agencies said this week. The emphasis, which begins June 14, is intended “to increase pedestrian awareness and promote pedestrian safety,” according to a WSP news release. Officers will contact jaywalkers, hand out educational brochures and encourage pedestrians to use sidewalks and crosswalks in the terminal zone. A recent survey conducted by officers over two days found that 26-39 percent of pedestrians did not utilitize designated crosswalks, police said. Following the emphasis patrols, officers will begin issuing citations for infractions beginning June 28.

The sign’s up: museum’s coming

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Youth service group creates the new Children’s Museum’s signature artwork.
For their first project, Rotary Interact decided to think big: 12 feet by 48 feet. The mural created by the new youth service group was dedicated in a public ceremony Tuesday at the site of the Children’s Museum of Bainbridge Island, the new kids’ play-and-learn paradise slated to open this fall in the former Packard Building. “I don’t think I would ever have designed a mural myself,” said Sally Lindsley, an Interact member who will be a junior at Bainbridge High School next fall.

A week off, then it’s back to school

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Bainbridge sends an unprecedented five students to summer exchange in Japan.
Jordan Anton will be starting his second year of high school, not in September, but next week – in Japan. The BHS freshman is one of five Bainbridge High School students who received the Japan-American Friendship Scholarship, which funds a six-week summer exchange program in Japan. They will be among about 100 students who will live with host families and attend academic classes – the Japanese school year ends in March and starts up again in April. “I’m going to try to absorb as much of the culture as I can in the short time – and make the most of my trip,” Anton said.

Report: top city posts are underpaid

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

The administration will recommend pay hikes for several department heads.
City department heads are under-compensated by as much as 31 percent compared to their peers in other area municipalities, a new survey of salaries and benefits says. The city administration will likely recommend salary hikes for several top posts, either to take effect mid-year or with the 2005 budget, interim city Administrator Lee Walton said Friday. “I think we have a pretty good management staff,” Walton said. “If we want to keep these people, we need to be competitive.” At issue are the salaries and benefits for directors of the public works, finance, planning and information technology departments, and the police chief.

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