Story Archives

Archive Results — 20551 thru 20575 of about 21850 items

Too hasty on moratorium

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:31PM

When the city council imposed a moratorium on some shoreline development, including docks and bulkheads, it acted on the belief that the city had only a year to revise such regulations to conform to new state requirements. Five days later, the state Shoreline Hearings Board kicked the props out from under the whole plan, when it tossed out those same state requirements and told the Department of Ecology to rewrite them. By law, local jurisdictions have 24 months to bring their programs into conformity with new state requirements, and that law is what triggered the city's time-line.

Sharing a Sacred ChantCantor reflects on the meaning of the 'Kol Nidre'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:31PM

Jewish community members Terry Cowan and Toby Schneider will chant Kol Nidre, marking the eve of Yom Kippur.For Jews who hear it, Kol Nidre can be a deeply moving experience - as it is for those who sing it.Since both Cowan and Schneider have chanted Kol Nidre many years for their respective Jewish groups, the two women have had time to consider what the music means to them.I was raised in a synagogue, Schneider said. I heard chanting as a child and I loved it. When I'm focused on Kol Nidre, those words link me to my ancestors. When I sing it, I represent the congregation through my voice. I am a vehicle.

Math down, language upPreliminary WASL results are mixed for island students.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Math scores among elementary-age Bainbridge students are declining, while reading, writing and listening skills continue to climb.Those are the preliminary findings of the latest round of Washington Assessment of Student Learning testing.While preliminary, this data does invite attention to the area of mathematics, said Faith Chapel, new superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Bainbridge Island School District.Results from the WASLs and other tests will be analyzed during this year's K-12 mathematics program review, she said.

Prudence marks school budgetWith district enrollment stagnant, officials buckle down.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

A conservative approach marks the 2001-2002 district budget adopted by the Bainbridge Island School Board last week. With expenditures only $260,000 below revenues, this is a very tight budget indeed, district financial officer Peggy Paige said. There is little room for unplanned expenditures.The district projects $26.412 million in revenue for the coming year, and $26.150 million in expenditures.

Mastering the gift of making you giveFund-raiser extraordinaire Larry Mills is Bainbridge Citizen of the Year.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Unlike most of us, Larry Mills doesn't mind asking other people for money.His willingness to undertake fund-raising projects has made him much in demand as a board member for organizations such as the Bainbridge Library, Bainbridge Performing Arts and the Bainbridge Foundation.For his charitable work on behalf of a variety of island causes, the Bainbridge Island Kiwanis Club has named Mills its 2001 Citizen of the Year.

Fine choices in primary

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Mail-only primary ballots, which should appear in Bainbridge mailboxes this week, are abbreviated affairs, as only two city council races and the open seat on the fire commission attracted enough contenders to require a primary election.

Dog Daze a way of giving back to Helpline House

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Just saying thank you wasn't enough.Jillian Bateman sought a more tangible expression of gratitude to Helpline House, so she is producing the Dog Daze benefit concert, Sept. 9.I wanted to show them I appreciate what they've done, Bateman said. And I guess I do like organizing stuff.

School zone safety gets a boostBetter signs and reduced speeds all day will complement tougher enforcement.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Better signs and high-profile police presence will promote safety in school zones this fall, advocates hope.A grant from the Washington State Traffic Safety Commission will fund overtime work and put extra patrol officers around schools for the next two weeks, Bainbridge Police Traffic Officer Rob Corn said. Police will use radar enforcement and a portable speed sign to show drivers how fast they're going.Also, the city's public works department will revise school zone speed limits to specify 20 mph from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for Blakely and Wilkes elementary schools during weekdays.

Hearing shows rift over charterPerceptions of the document depend on which side of the bridge you're on.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

For those looking for the unexpected, Tuesday night's freeholder meeting at Bainbridge Island City Hall was the wrong place to be.As expected, the principal topic of discussion concerning the draft charter for Kitsap County was whether to elect the county council by district, as a majority of the freeholders propose, or to elect county-wide, as is currently done.

Interest strong among fire hopefulsVoters will narrow the field to two on the primary ballot.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Continuing a recent trend of high interest in service on the Bainbridge Island Fire Board, four candidates go before voters in the Sept. 18.All vie for the single open seat on the three-person board, and two will advance to the November general ballot. In interviews with the Review this week, candidates discussed their qualifications and views on issues facing the department, including tax funding; collective bargaining with career fire personnel; maintaining the volunteer program; and developing facilities and equipment.

88 keys, 84 yearsA local senior reaches out to benefit the island's new Catholic preschool.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Intergenerational outreach works both ways.This fall, students at the new Mustard Seed preschool/kindergarten at St. Cecilia Catholic Church will visit senior citizens at Virginia Villa Retirement Center as part of their curriculum.As if in return, Trudy Pival, 84 years old, long-time island resident and original organist for the St. Cecilia parish, will use her musical skills to help Mustard Seed in a benefit concert, Sept. 9. The reason is, Pival says briskly, I have six children and we lived on Bainbridge for 27 summers, but every year we had to pack up and go back to Seattle so the children could go to parochial school.I am so glad to support the beginnings of a Catholic school here.

Cable discussion runs on fast track

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

The word for Bainbridge Island’s approach to AT&T is “gingerly.” While city officials believe significant gains could result if AT&T replaces Northland as the city’s cable TV operator, it wants to make sure that some present advantages are not lost in the process.

A mixed family heritage

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

When Rose and Tom Hesselbrock looked into the tiny face of their adopted daughter Caley for the first time in 1991, the Bainbridge couple, like new parents everywhere, fell in love. Caley’s mixed heritage from an African American birth father and Caucasian birth mother in no way lessened the Hesselbrocks’ regard for their daughter – but her background would present ethical dilemmas as they considered raising a child of color on predominantly white Bainbridge.

What do we pay for growth?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

At first blush, the city’s preliminary budget looks badly askew. Viewed by percentages, the largest item of spending for the coming year is labeled “support for developers.” The budget item totals over $3.2 million – almost 20 percent of the operations budget – in 2002.

Celebrating our nation’s first heritage

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:30PM

Coastal Native cedar basket meets Plains Indian powwow drum, as native traditions from all over “Turtle Island” are celebrated during Native American month.

Sowing seeds of hope at harvest time

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

There’s more than enough hunger to go around this Thanksgiving. Helpline House has seen a 25 percent increase in the number of families using its food bank services over the past year, director Joanne Tews said. “Usually we see 130 families,” Tews said. “This year it’s 160.” A disturbing trend, she said, is the increasing number of people with jobs who can’t make ends meet.

A good year for Coho mojo

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

It begins, as such matters often do, with the coquettish wiggle of a tail. With a like-minded mate, that wiggle becomes a spirited, frenzied flapping, and a brief but intense union on a bed of loose gravel into which will be committed the seed of the next generation. Give the event sufficient vigor – two salmon can indeed make quite a ruckus – and even the neighbors may notice.

Another chapter in the saga of the WTO

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

For Bainbridge activist/authors Linda Wolf and Neva Welton, writing “Global Uprising: Confronting the Tyrannies of the 21st Century” has served personal ends, and larger ones.

Buyout clouds cable service

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

AT&T Broadband’s buyout of the Northland cable TV franchise on Bainbridge Island will require approval by the city.

Meanwhile, historians hope to save one of the plant’s last houses.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

As a Superfund environmental cleanup rolls on around it, an old house needs a new home. Local historians hope to preserve the former Wyckoff plant’s sole remaining row house, believed to be of pre-World War I construction and the last of 17 that were part of the company town called Creosote.

Wyckoff work draws Cantwell visit

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

On the home front, the environment still matters. Touring the Wyckoff Superfund site Saturday afternoon, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell pledged support for completion of cleanup projects around the Northwest, even as the nation’s attention is focused abroad.

Sutton hails win for open space levy

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

Voter support for an $8 million open space levy didn’t surprise Mayor Dwight Sutton. The level of that support – 68 percent – did. “It’s a great outcome,” said Sutton, who proposed the levy earlier this year and shepherded it to Tuesday’s ballot.

Voters go with Kordonowy

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

Twin themes that emerged from Tuesday’s elections were “work hard, think green.” The winners of the mayoral and three city council races did that. They campaigned virtually full time. And they established themselves early on as environmental candidates, allowing them to carry their campaign to the Bainbridge business community.

Legacy of the Seattle pioneers

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

When Suzanne Selfors and her daughter Isabelle Ranson disembark from the schooner “Sea Scout” at Alki Point next Tuesday, they will be retracing the steps of ancestors. Selfors and Ranson with other descendants of Seattle’s first white settlers – the Bells, Borens, Dennys, Lows and Terrys – will be recreating the Nov. 13, 1851 debarkation from the schooner “Exact” to kick off a year-long celebration of Seattle’s 150th anniversary.

UPDATE:Kordonowy, open space levy earn easy victories

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 3:29PM

Darlene Kordonowy and a levy to save Bainbridge open space rode overwhelming voter support to victory Tuesday. Kordonowy earned better than 63 percent against Chris Llewellyn in the race to succeed Dwight Sutton as the next mayor of Bainbridge Island.

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