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Archive Results — 20501 thru 20525 of about 23125 items

Council to meet tonight -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

The Bainbridge Island City Council will hold a special workshop at 6 p.m. this evening, July 7, in the council chambers. The council will hear a year-to-date report on the city’s financial status, with a discussion of the upcoming budget process for 2005.

Authority drops park purchase

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

Tenants now will try to buy the property, with a developer’s help.
The Kitsap County Consoli­dated Housing Authority on Friday yielded its option to purchase the Islander Mobile Home Park, at the request of the city. The housing authority sent a letter of rescission to the attorney of the park’s owner, Pat Alderman, withdrawing from the purchase and sales agreement signed May 2003, KCCHA deputy executive director Roger Waid said. The move, backed by the tenants of the 60-space mobile home park north of City Hall, clears the way for tenants and local developer Kelly Samson to pursue their own plans for the property.

Gathering ‘round the Chuckwagon

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

Meal program for seniors dishes up square meals, good company.
Hot food nourishes more than just hungry stomachs at a Chuckwagon lunch. “It’s a real friendly, nice place to go every day and have a nice lunch,” Phyllis Kupka said. “Socializing – that’s the biggest part of it.” Every weekday, the Chuckwagon Senior Nutrition Program dishes up hot, nutritious lunches to some 30 members of the island’s 60-and-over crowd at the Bainbridge Island Senior Community Center. The meals are prepared in Bremerton, and then delivered to the senior center and seven other locations around the county, and served by volunteers.

A blast of summer color

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

Bainbridge In Bloom promises a garden showcase this weekend.
Linda Cochran’s Fort Ward garden is a setting where plant choice and placement prove that one may paint without pigments and sculpt without clay. Cochran uses the compositional elements that are the stock-in-trade of the visual artist – scale, texture, line, form, and especially contrast – to create living artworks. A 12-by-12-foot square of grass-like carex frames a single banana plant, the soft textures of the grass a perfect foil for the showy leaves of the banana, and the geometric shape of the overall planting.

Winery reopens on Day Road

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

After delays, Bentryns’ business is uncorked for the July 4th weekend.
The Bainbridge Island Winery is open again. The winery’s move from its longtime home in downtown Winslow to a 23-acre farm on Day Road will have its advantages. “We want to give the public a wine experience from the ground up,” said JoAnn Bentryn, co-owner of the Bainbridge Island Vineyards and Winery with husband Gerard Bentryn. The winery and wine-tasting room were closed for nine weeks while the Bentryns moved out of their old location off Highway 305, which the couple sold last year. Opening of the business at Day Road was delayed this spring by building permitting issues and an ordinance restricting retail sales year-round on farms. Mediation between the city and winery allowed the winery to open for retail sales, pending the revised ordinance, which was passed by the city council last week. The new tasting room opened yesterday and will be open through the Fourth of July weekend.

Rezone sought for Winslow development

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

The Navy plans to redevelop, sell its small housing tract on Government Way.
A Texas-based development concern, working under contract with the U.S. Navy, hopes to extend Winslow’s high-density residential core one block west, through a rezone that would allow intensive redevelopment of what is now a Navy housing project off Wyatt Way and Grow Avenue. “Our goal is to maximize the site,” said David Smith, a Houston-based planning consultant associated with the project, in an interview Friday. American Eagle Communities LLC of Dallas, Texas, filed applications Thursday for an amendment to the island’s Comprehensive Plan, seeking redesignation of the 5.42-acre Government Way housing tract from “Urban Multifamily” to the “Mixed Use Town Center” designation.

Green, green eelgrass of home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:16PM

New beds in Eagle Harbor could boost nearshore ecological health.
The volunteers dig muddy furrows in tideflats that smell heavily of the sea. Mucky mud, under patches of stringy, spring-green seaweed, sucks at boots and threaten to unshoe them. One by one the shoots of eelgrass, looking like strands of drowned chives, are gently planted into their new home – in an environmental restoration project that could gauge, and improve, the ecological health of Eagle Harbor. “Eelgrass is the canary of water quality,” said Merrill Robison, whose Lovell Avenue tideflats received the eelgrass transplant of eelgrass, in a project sponsored by the Bainbridge-based Puget Sound Restoration Fund.

Get set for full weekend of fun

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The July 3-4 festivities offer live music and a grand parade.
“We’re havin’ a party, and everybody’s swinging/dancing to the music.” When the Original Fenderskirts – Dianne Trani, Kaetche Miller and Ginni Hawkins – belt out the Sam Cook tune, they’ll be singing to bring the lyrics to life. The group headlines the July 3 Street Dance and Barbecue, part of a weekend-long holiday celebration, with Saturday’s festivities presented by the Bainbridge Island Downtown Association and the Grand Old Fourth celebration sponsored by the Bainbridge Island Chamber of Commerce. (For a complete schedule of weekend events, see page A2.)

Grand Old Fourth –– News And Event Schedule

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Bainbridge Island Fire Department advises islanders to leave fireworks displays to the professionals this weekend. “Many individuals feel that a Fourth of July celebration is not complete without fireworks, and often purchase and discharge illegal fireworks,” said BIFD Chief Jim Walkowski in a news release. “Unfortunately, many celebrations turn to tragedy when careless and inappropriate use of fireworks results in injury or fire.”

Rascal Harry Tracy seizes BPA

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Melodrama mines events in island history.
Doe-eyed Emily Kight, dressed in a pink crinoline confection, stands stock still while Guy Sidora as villain Harry Tracy, disguised in a beret, circles our heroine with a predatory sneer that would do the Big Bad Wolf proud. “I would like to buy some of your lovely strawberries,” he says, with a bogus French accent. “I’ve never in my life experienced anything so very...luscious. We Frenchmen are famous for our, shall we say, our sense when something is...ripe. For the picking, eh?” The actors lay it on with a trowel, but the over-the-top quality is just right in “Harry Tracy, A Bainbridge Bandit!” – perhaps the first original melodrama based on island history. The brainchild of island improv actor John Ellis, who wrote the script with Seattle’s Andrew Shields, the work is based on accounts of a visit paid to the island by Harry Tracy, the most notorious criminal of his day.

‘Fahrenheit’ finds eager audience

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Controversial film breaks records at the Lynwood.
It’s a fact: filmmaker Michael Moore is a bigger draw than invading space aliens on Bainbridge. “We did three times the box office of ‘Men In Black’ or ‘Independence Day’ (on opening weekend),” said TJ Faddis, manager of the Historic Lynwood Theatre, of Moore’s documentary “Fahrenheit 9/11,” which opened at the theater Friday. “I thought it would build,” she said. “We’re kind of standing here with our mouths agape.” Faddis estimates about 2,800 Lynwood patrons watched “Fahrenheit 9/11” over the three-day weekend – surpassing every record she’s seen set in her 20 years with the theater. The film about the Bush administration’s reaction to the events of Sept. 11, 2001, saw the Lynwood’s midday showings sell out for the first time. Of the 12 weekend showings, seven were sold out.

Medina to lead wildlife shelter -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Island Wildlife Shelter at Bloedel Reserve has named Kol Medina, a Bainbridge Island attorney specializing in environmental law, as the shelter’s new half-time executive director. Medina, a Stanford University Law School graduate, has served on the board of directors for the shelter for three years, and was its vice president before resigning to become executive director. He will be in charge of administration and development, while Sandra Fletcher continues to serve as director of wildlife rehabilitation, caring for the wild creatures brought to the shelter.

Forging new and better trails

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Experts will teach volunteers how to beat the best forest path.
Take acres of open space and some community volunteers, add a professionally sponsored workshop, and the result could be miles and miles of new island trails. The Subaru/International Moun­tain Bike Association’s trail care crew comes to Bainbridge Island to give a free, two-day workshop on building sustainable trails July 10-11, commencing with a slideshow July 8. “We have this coalescence of open space coming online – either for transportation connections or recreational opportunities, (and) we have a great volunteer base on the island,” said John Grinter, a member of the park district’s trails advisory committee. “What this will do is teach us how to build (trails) properly the first time, and hopefully reduce taxpayer expense.”

Fischer named planning czar for downtown

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The community design expert will lead a 75-member ‘Congress.’
Landscape architect and community design specialist Sandy Fischer will serve as manager for the Winslow Tomorrow downtown planning project. Her selection was announced Tuesday by Mayor Darlene Kordonowy, after a weeks-long review process that included top city officials, citizens and council members. A relatively new island resident, Fischer brings expertise from her 20 years as principal of Fischer and Associates, a Montana-based planning and landscape architecture firm. “It’s great to have someone who’s somewhat familiar with the community, but not entrenched in any of the solutions we’ve been talking about,” Kordonowy said.

Man stabbed during party -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Fistfights flowed and a stabbing followed at a gathering of young people at a Baker Hill residence early Wednesday morning. The incident left 18-year-old Nicholas Duran of Bainbridge Island hospitalized with a severe laceration to his abdomen and other wounds, Bainbridge Police Detective Scott Anderson said. The suspect, William “Liam” Dipert, age 23, of Bainbridge Island, was booked into Kitsap County Jail on suspicion of first degree assault, Anderson said.

Party season is here - do parents care?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Just Know Coalition vows to carry its anti-drug message forward.
Youth party season is in full swing, a reminder that summer’s here. This year is different in at least one respect; Just Know, a group formed last fall to reduce risky behavior among youth is hanging in, determined to meet the challenge of reducing teen substance abuse on Bainbridge. “I’ve never sat on a committee that had more energy and focus,” said Bainbridge School Board President Bruce Weiland, who worked with the group of parents, educators, medical professionals, fire and police, arts organizations, therapists, business leaders and others. “It’s been an exciting year.”

The berry that loved Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Whatever happened to the tasty Marshall strawberry?
By all accounts, the Marshall strawberry was the tastiest, juiciest strawberry around. Hundreds of acres of the Marshall variety once covered Bain­bridge, and the island was largely known for the berry. “Marshalls are probably the only strawberry to me that tasted good,” said Art Koura, who was born in 1918 and remembers picking berries on his parents’ farm. “Marshalls had a very meaty heart, and tender skin.” By contrast, Koura says, today’s strawberries are so hard “you could play marbles with them.” Yet today, the Marshall strawberry is effectively gone; delicate and less productive, it declined in the face of more commercially viable varieties.

WSF tightening vessel security

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Plans for a new pedestrian access are scuttled, upsetting trails advocates.
Tighter security measures are kicking in aboard Washington State Ferries and at terminals, officials said this week. A pack of explosives-sniffing dogs is being trained and deployed, more state troopers will be seen on vessels, and even riders themselves are being enlisted in the cause – asked to be on the lookout for suspicious activity. “It makes sense,” said Pat Patterson, WSF spokeswoman. “There are a lot of folks who are your readers who ride those boats five days a week or more, and know when something isn’t quite right.” The changes were announced at a press conference Monday, which included a statement by WSF Director Mike Thorne.

Stuff and nonsense

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The 44th annual Rotary Auction promises a little bit of everything this Saturday.
Like the storm surge of “The Day After Tomorrow” – a wall of water that buried Manhattan in the recent blockbuster film – the growing stream of stuff arriving curbside threatens to engulf Woodward Middle School. Donations for the Rotary Auction and Rummage Sale, to be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 26, are being disgorged at a rate that would bring the mound of bicycles and backpacks, golf bags and gizmos level with the roof – if the piles weren’t simultaneously whittled away by volunteers who lug the goods off in shopping carts, wheelbarrows, handcarts and a red wagon. “It’s absolutely fantastic that so many people contribute,” said Rotarian Jim Chapel, this year’s event chair. “We have 600 volunteers sorting donations into 33 departments.” The compendium of articles is so exhaustive that a Stone Age time-traveler dropped onto the site could do one-stop shopping for the accoutrements to contemporary life – and then some.

There's a bear in the woods

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Adam Morrow went looking for a bear, and had a surprise encounter Saturday evening. Morrow was in his car with his niece and nephew, following up on a bear sighting near Sunrise Drive, when he heard two youngsters screaming – and saw them running away from a bear that was bounding across an open field. “I just yelled, ‘Come jump in the car!’” Morrow said. “They dove right into the car. They were shaken up and shaking.”

Make your favorite Martian, no strings attached

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Artists Hall and Fraga cook up an alien invasion for Independence Day.
Giant Martians are landing here this summer. A fleet of 10-by-20-foot paper mâché puppets is being crafted to march in next month’s Fourth of July parade. The alien invasion is the brainchild of island animator Wendy Hall and gallery owner/artist Kathe Fraga, who invite islanders to join in making the puppets at informal workshops held at Oil and Water, the new art supply store across from the Pavilion. “The thing about these (puppets) is you can’t believe it ‘til you see it,” Hall said. “You’re looking at all this paper mâché and fabric and poles lying around, but when you stand that puppet up and start to move it around, it becomes real.”

Marine center in bad straits -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

The Poulsbo Marine Science Center is launching a major fund and membership drive, under the theme “We Let Our Friends In For Free,” to run through this summer. For its marine environmental programs to continue, the center needs to expand its membership base, especially in light of financial shortfalls experienced by the educational, nonprofit institution. Anyone joining at the $45 level receives 18 months of free admission to the center and many of its programs, for the entire family, as well as a CD-ROM about local marine life. Those joining at the $60 level also receive a copy of the new Seattle Aquarium DVD, “Life on the Edge.”

Priced out of house and home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:15PM

Island property is out of reach of low-to-middle incomes, says task force.
A salary of $56,088 a year seems decent – until you want to buy a house on Bainbridge Island. On Bainbridge, that salary is 80 percent of the community’s median income – $70,110 – and right on the line between low and moderate income as defined by federal housing standards. That means a firefighter or teacher can afford to buy a house if it’s in the $129,000 to $202,000 range; “middle income” small business owners and loan officers making $67,305 to $84,132 could afford a house costing $242,000 to $303,000.

Park residents chase destiny

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

The mobile home park could be purchased by a nonprofit cooperative.
Residents of the Islander Mobile Home Park hope they have their destiny in their own hands. Their tenants association hopes to work with a California-based company to form a nonprofit in order to purchase the 6.4-acre park just north of City Hall in Winslow for $5.5 million. Part of the land would be purchased by local developer Kelly Samson, for redevelopment as market-rate housing; the remaining park would include around 50 mobile homes. For resident Laura Barnard, the proposal means “independence.”

Different folks, same strokes

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:14PM

Growing club promotes rowing as a sport for all ages and skills.
Downtown Winslow is deserted at dawn, but laughter and chatter filter up from Waterfront Park. Quartets of women balancing heavy rowing shells on their shoulders walk to the water’s edge. Spring rain or autumn darkness notwithstanding, the masters women’s team of the Bainbridge Island Rowing Club is out on the water at 5 a.m. at least three days a week from February to November. “For that hour and a half, you think of nothing else – life’s worries are just not there,” rower Linda Desrosiers said. “I can’t think of anything (other) than focusing on the next stroke.”

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