Story Archives

Archive Results — 20226 thru 20250 of about 22775 items

A shoebox of wartime memories

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Karen Sladek shares her father’s correspondence from World War II.
Dusty letters in a cardboard box made history come alive for Karen Sladek. The first-time author’s tribute to her father is “Lucky Stars and Gold Bars,” a history based on Lyle Sladek’s letters home during World War II. “I’d never dreamed of writing a book,” Sladek said. “I didn’t know I had a book in me.” But she found herself as an author after she moved to the island from Kirkland in 1996 and quit her job as administrator of the University of Washington’s Center for AIDS and STDs a year later.

Report: school impact fees OK

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The district gets a second opinion, after complaints by a parent.
School impact fees on new homes are collected properly under state law, an attorney for the Bainbridge Island School District says. G. Richard Hill, of the Seattle firm of McCullough Hill Fikso Kretschmer Smith, said in a report released last week that the district is in compliance “with the spirit and the letter of the Growth Management Act and the United States Constitution.” He was retained to review the district’s impact fee program, after the fees were challenged by Daniel Smith, a citizen who follows local school issues.

Caring is their calling

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Youth leaders ‘adopt’ an islander stricken with multiple sclerosis.
Missy the cat is hiding from “the Thursday people.” The reclusive feline – an Island Health and Rehabilitation Center pet that has unofficially adopted resident Judy Kveitkauskas – retreats under the bedclothes when the teens, who named themselves for the day of their weekly visit, come calling. The cat has had time to acclimatize; the youths have visited Kveitkauskas, who is paralyzed by multiple sclerosis, every Thursday afternoon since January.

Berg’s drawings blend Picasso with Prismacolors

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Mackenzie Berg’s menageries are peaceable kingdoms where bugs and birds mingle, and a grasshopper’s antenna just might sport a spider’s web. “I don’t think there’s anything more beautiful than an animal,” Berg said. “The flowers and trees are gorgeous, but animals are so pure in what they do that to be able to capture it on paper is incredible.”

Legion plans observance -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Memorial Day Services sponsored by Colin Hyde Post No. 172 will take place at two locations on May 31. The public is invited to attend the programs, to “honor our dead, remember the cause for which they fought and affirm our trust in the future.” Starting at 10:45 a.m., Legionnaires, Auxiliary and others will meet at the Veterans Memorial at Bainbridge High School. A brief service will be conducted and the area surrounding the monument will be decorated with flowers and flags.

Spreading hope in a brown bag

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Woodward students take lunches to Seattle’s downtrodden.
To some 40 homeless people in Seattle’s Occidental Park, Woodward Middle School students brought more than lunch. Distributing bag lunches to the homeless in Seattle Friday, the school’s leadership class helped fulfill a mission of the Sebastion Galpert Scholarship Fund. The project was one of the first awards given out by the fund for “Adventures in Altruism” proposed by middle school students. “The thing people on the street thank me for is for bringing people like you around,” said the Rev. Nyer Urness, an islander and retired pastor who has worked with Seattle’s homeless population for more than 30 years.

Farm package before council

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Farmers say year-round retail sales would boost local agriculture.
Farmers love good weather during growing season. The economic forecast may be looking up, too, as the city finally considers letting them sell value-added products year-round. “On a small farm, you can’t make a lot of money just growing crops,” said Krista Martin of Meadowhawk Farm, “but if you make it into wine or create a product people appreciate, it changes the value of your crop a lot. The potential for income changes completely.”

Neighbor sues city over old decant site

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Dan Brewer says a creek is being polluted, even as the parcel is cleaned up.
Apparently dissatisfied with cleanup of the former decant facility at the Head of the Bay, a neighbor has sued the city seeking an injunction against future activities there, and seeking damages. The complaint was filed Thursday in U.S. District Court, under the federal Clean Water Act and Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Eagle Harbor Drive resident Dan Brewer charges that in storing road sweepings, ditch spoils, gunk from storm drains and other material on the site for years, the city is contaminating nearby Cooper Creek and a wetland, and threatening wells that serve Winslow residents.

Steamer trip is a sellout -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The Bainbridge Island Historical Society’s round-the-island tour aboard the steamer Virginia V won’t take place for another month yet, but the society is already planning to do another. Tickets still are available, however, for a cruise from Bainbridge Island back to Seattle after the around-the-island tour. The around-the-island trip, scheduled for June 27, sold out on the second day of ticket sales Tuesday, said Ralph Cheadle, co-chair of the event. “I expected we would fill the ship up for the around-the-island cruise, but I had no idea we would do it as quickly as we did,” Cheadle said.

Holding out a branch for peace

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

BHS junior returns from trip with PeaceTrees Vietnam.
For Bainbridge High School junior Thea Thompson, a recent trip to Vietnam was a chance to plant trees and propagate friendships. Thompson and 11 other Americans spent two weeks in March and April in Quang Tri Province, planting a thousand trees at PeaceTrees Village, a town of 100 new homes built by the Bainbridge-based nonprofit, PeaceTrees Vietnam. “I didn’t know about (PeaceTrees) until my mom’s friend told me,” Thompson said. “I called them. They were, like, ‘Peace Trees is about building community relationships with the people in Vietnam, and you go there and you plant trees.’” I said, ‘Sounds good.’”

Seeing the face behind the tics

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Tourette Syndrome educator helps the public look beyond the stereotypes.
Sometimes half the battle is understanding what you face. Children with Tourette Syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics, are often misdiagnosed for years. TS sufferers can be misinterpreted as “troublemakers” who want to draw attention to themselves. But that’s the last thing they want, explains islander Bernadette Witty. Witty knows; she was not diagnosed with TS until age 32. Now, as president of the Washington State Chapter of the national Tourette Syn­drome Association, Witty is educating teachers, parents, patients and the public about the disorder.

Citizen panel touts creation of ethics board

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

A citizen committee this week recommended the creation of a formal code of ethics for the city, as well as a five-person ethics board with the power to subpoena witnesses and documents. The recommendation follows a year of study by an advisory committee comprised of Charles Schimd, longtime community activist; Jim O’Connor, former King County hearing examiner; and Bob Schoonmaker, owner of the Chandlery. The recommendations were “not motivated by members of our committee, or those to whom we spoke, by specific complaints of (un)ethical behaivior,” Schmid said, writing for the committee in an introductory report.

Fire Dept. tax hike goes up in smoke

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

The 10 percent increase fails to attract voters in low turnout Tuesday.
Voters appeared to defeat a property tax levy “lid lift” try by the Bainbridge Island Fire Department in a special ballot Tuesday. Unofficial final returns Friday showed 3,646 “no” votes, or 51.2 percent, against 3,475 “yes” votes, or 48.8 percent. Voter turnout was under 50 percent, with an unknown number of stray ballots yet to be counted. Fire officials held out hope that a late-week count of outstanding mail ballots would turn the election in their favor, but it did not gain ground on the deficit that emerged in first returns Tuesday.

Herring deaths a mystery

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Researchers are puzzled by a high mortality rate among egg samples in a spawning ground at Hidden Cove.
Hidden Cove has a real whodunit – herring eggs laid there are dying. Although signs point to a toxic compound as the cause, embryologists with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife haven’t seen this type of mortality before. “(We’re) seeing cell death that isn’t consistent with the published literature,” said Jim West, a research scientist with Fish and Wildlife. Studies show that herring egg mortality in Hidden Cove is unusually high and chronic, yet also unpredictable. While some data suggest toxic compounds from oil – polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs – found in the water could be the cause, not all the evidence supports that conclusion, and more targeted research is needed, West says.

Fire levy going down to defeat

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:12PM

Voters appeared to defeat a property tax levy “lid lift” try by the Bainbridge Island Fire Department in a special ballot Tuesday. Unofficial final returns Friday showed 3,646 “no” votes, or 51.2 percent, against 3,475 “yes” votes, or 48.8 percent. Voter turnout was under 50 percent, with an unknown number of stray ballots yet to be counted.

Znetix trio found guilty -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Three stock salesman were found guilty in federal court Monday of multiple felonies, after a seven-week trial stemming from the Znetix/Health Maintenance Centers securities scam. Convicted before the Seattle bench of Judge Marcia Pechman were Larry L. Beaman, 62, of Ridgefield, Wash., Michael J. Culp, 33, of Bothell, and Harvey W. Kuiken, 52, of Newcastle. A jury returned convictions on a total of 52 felony counts, including securities fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy and money laundering.

BPA looking back at those high school years

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Then as now, teen concerns remain the same, Fogell believes.
Adults and teens may not be able to “walk in each others’ moccasins” - but a Bainbridge Performing Arts workshop performance invites them to try on the footwear for an evening. Created by BPA theater school director Steven Fogell, the E.Y.E.S. Project (Emplowering Youth, Enlightening Society) seeks to span the generation gap with a presentation of tales of high school years submitted by current students and graduates. Fogell invites submission of stories for inclusion in the next August’s performance, when graduates’ stories will be read by young people, and youth tales will find adult readers. “I’m starting to receive peoples’ writings,” Fogell said. “It’s very exciting.”

He’s at home in the kitchen

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Fourteen-year-old Spencer Coplan is already an award-winning chef.
The head chef, dressed in kitchen whites, dips a spoon into a saucepan to taste and evaluate the flavor. It’s a scene that plays out in a hundred Puget Sound restaurants every day. But this taste test is unique because the chef is West Sound Academy eighth grader Spencer Coplan – already such an accomplished culinary artist at age 14, that the young islander’s original recipe took first place in a national contest last month.

Moving up by moving away

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A new study reveals the exodus of middle- and low-income families.
Bainbridge is losing its wage earners. Not at work, but at home. A report by the Mayor’s Affordable Housing Task Force, to be presented at City Hall this evening at 6 p.m., says island households making $35,000 or less annually declined 40.5 percent from 1994 to 2003. Of residents in the 18-34 age group, “there has been a significant decline,” the report says. And it is a lack of affordable housing that’s driving moderate- and low-income families off the island – as illustrated by Madeline Johnson and her two children who wanted to stay, but could not. “At one point it was a hard decision, and at one point it was an easy decision,” said Johnson, leaving Bainbridge to take advantage of a self-help housing program in Poulsbo. “I’m at least grateful not to be moving five states away.”

City may buy 49-acre woodland by Gazzam

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The serene Peters property is eyed with $1.01 million in open space funding.
Olemara Peters has some strong views about land. One is that it belongs to itself – the people on it are secondary. But someone has to hold title, and nearly half the Peters family holdings near Gazzam Lake may soon come under public ownership. An agreement signed this week would see the public purchase of some 49 acres of forestland for $1.01 million, under the city’s open space preservation program. “I’m disconcerted by what I see going on, and I definitely want it not to go on here,” said Peters, a Redmond resident whose paternal family ties to Bainbridge go back generations. “My mother grew up partly among Native Americans in Missouri and Oklahoma, with mentors who I think taught her the things I’ve gotten the benefit from,” she said. “And I know my thought of the land belonging to itself comes from long before white folks got here and started paving it all.”

Briggs picked to head city -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

As Bainbridge Island was looking into Mary Jo Briggs, Mary Jo Briggs was looking into Bainbridge Island. Each, it turns out, liked what they saw. “My sources were many when I was investigating the community, and it has had a somewhat tumultuous past as far as competing interests and different ideas about the direction Bainbridge should go,” said Briggs, confirmed this week as the city’s next administrator. “What I find refreshing is, I perceive now a universal commitment between the mayor and council to moving the city forward in a positive way.

Searching for a sense of place

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

His pursuit of America’s shared narrative takes Egan on a yearly, 40,000-mile trek.
For Timothy Egan, the quintessential American road trip is a search for “place,” for geography overlaid with a shared apprehension of the historical and psychological terrain. Egan, a Seattle author who is a national reporter for the New York Times, brings Puget Sound landscapes into focus and turns an incisive eye on the larger West in works that include “The Good Rain: Across Time and Terrain in the Pacific Northwest” (1990); “Breaking Blue” (1992); and “Lasso the Wind: Away to the New West” (1999).

Merchants lobby for Ericksen, Hildebrand connection

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A petition drive on store counters reaps 400 signatures.
In past years, when the question of joining Ericksen Avenue and Hildebrand Lane has come up, officials have usually heard from one constituency: Ericksen residents saying “no.” Now they’re hearing from another: Hildebrand merchants and customers saying “yes.” The dynamic between residential and commercial interests came into relief this week, when the City Council was presented with petitions bearing some 400 signatures, calling for a formal connection between the two Winslow streets. Signatures were primarily gathered on the counters of Hildebrand businesses. “There is a need we’ve heard, to deal with this pretty quickly,” said Kevin Dwyer, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce, which sponsored the petition.

Economic diversity is on the wane

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A report says the island is getting more affluent, housing choices disappearing.
After waiting nine years, Madeline Johnson is finally getting an affordable home of her own – by moving off-island. “It’s like moving my life,” Johnson said. “(But) if I didn’t, I wouldn’t have this home.” Johnson’s situation reflects the findings of a just-released report from the mayor’s 2004 Affordable Housing Task Force, which found that affordable housing programs established by the city in 1997 have not been effective. The report will be presented at a special Affordable Housing Forum at City Hall at 6 p.m. May 19.

Learning about each other

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The Homework Club helps island Native American students.
Adaline Rapada couldn’t have a more rapt audience. As the sixth-grader reads from her Scholastic Magazine article about the upcoming Olympic games in Athens, Greece, Bainbridge High School junior John Emau kneels on the Ordway library floor next to her chair and listens attentively. “Greece will face many challenges when Olympic games return home this summer, but as the originator of the games, Greece has unbeatable...qualifications,” Rapada reads with ease, hesitating only when she comes to the last word.

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