Story Archives

Archive Results — 20151 thru 20175 of about 25650 items

Foil the tax man, but do it quick

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Is it too soon to start thinking about the 2005 Rotary Auction? We would have thought so too. Customarily on this island, one hoards in December and divests in June, and Christmas was still a month off when Rotarian Jim Chapel turned up in the newsroom on a recent afternoon.

Parking, and other island social ills

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Smoking. Drinking. Parking. Should we add the latter – and such associated blights as commuter-hour traffic, and the hordes of visigoths who stream onto the island from across the bridge every day – to the list of social ills subject to higher taxation by various levels of government?

For all those who labor with a full sink

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Once more to the archives: We’ll round out the Thanksgiving weekend with another historical offering from the pen of the delightful Frances Olin Gowen, post-holiday sentiments for anyone who slaved over a stove – and later, a sink full of dirty dishes – to make the holiday occasion fulfilling for hungry family and guests:

Kerry, part 2: Rejoin the world

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Isolationism, as it’s taught in the school books, refers to a national policy of avoiding international entanglements. We fear our nation has moved toward a new isolationism, not by avoiding adventurism abroad, but rather by pursuing it in defiance of international sentiment.

The bench test: a judicial primer

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

“Who,” a caller asked, “am I supposed to vote for in these judicial races? Will the Review be making any endorsements?” We had to confess that we’d been paying less attention than we ought to those seeking seats on the bench. But we knew whom to call – the excellent Charlie Wiggins, Bainbridge Island attorney and former Court of Appeals judge, who was kind enough to offer guidance for those equally vexed when the candidates don’t come with a convenient “R” or “D” next to their name.

Self-examination: the real lesson

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

The Midwest has sex education, the South, the theory of evolution -– timeworn and tired education debates both. So leave it to we Northwesterners, in our comparative sophistication, to find a more engaging bugaboo in the public school curriculum over which to agonize: the World War II internment of Japanese Americans.

Juvenile curfew: is it past time

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Lest diehard libertarians and free-spirited youths brand us, by turns, fascists and fuddy-duddies, let us assure all that we weren’t the ones who brought this up. But when, over luncheon last week, some community leaders tossed around the idea of imposing a juvenile curfew on Bainbridge Island, we thought it was worth at least some discussion. (And it made for a long lunch.)

Yes and Yes on park issues

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Bainbridge Island’s relationship with its park and recreation district is like an on-again, off-again romance. Community and parks are hopelessly entwined – just made for each other, their friends would say. Yet every few years, the community turns coy and fails a park levy. The parks respond by saying, “Come back soon, or we’re gone for good”; the prospect of cold, lonely days with nothing to do eventually sets in with the community, a new levy is passed, and the romance is back on for another two years.

Rezones: ask the right questions

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

If we presume to coin a new phrase – “rezone creep” – please don’t think we’re talking about a specific applicant. Rather, we refer to the cumulative (perhaps even stimulative) changes in local land-use patterns that could follow even minor fiddling with Winslow-area zoning.

Understand the choices in park elections

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

The old wheeze in those notoriously suspect Chicago elections used to be, “vote early and often.” While we can’t recommend grabbing two ballots, islanders on Sept. 14 will have the unusual challenge of voting for parks twice -- seven times, if you count park board races -- in the same election. The old wheeze in those notoriously suspect Chicago elections used to be, “vote early and often.” While we can’t recommend grabbing two ballots, islanders on Sept. 14 will have the unusual challenge of voting for parks twice -- seven times, if you count park board races -- in the same election.

Unmet needs find a champion

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

A blue-ribbon report that’s getting blue-ribbon results? It’s true. “It’s so exciting,” as one of our reporters beamed, “to see a report that actually goes somewhere.” Her enthusiasm – and ours – sprang from news, detailed Wednesday in this paper, that Peninsula Community Health Services will open a “pay as you can” clinic in the Bainbridge Commons every Monday beginning Aug. 2. Peninsula’s full range of primary care services will complement immunization and family planning long offered by the Kitsap County Health District clinic in the same building every Tuesday. Our unusually affluent community nonetheless has offered paltry options for the uninsured; the island’s woes were detailed on the medical chart of the “Community Needs Assessment” – prepared in 2003 under the auspices of the city’s Health, Housing and Human Services Council – which identified low-cost health care as a priority. As Peninsula CEO Barbara Malich drily recalls, “PCHS was ‘heavily requested’ to come and provide some services.”

The real challenge is still community

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

One of our points was, there’s enough incivility around these days that it can’t be described as a uniquely “liberal” or “Bainbridge” phenomenon. On cue, we received this email correspondence from a gentleman named Danny in Texas, responding to reports of rude treatment of a “Veteran for Bush” in the Grand Old Fourth parade: “You’re probably right about being the only newspaper that cares about Bainbridge Island. And from what I’ve just read about your citizens, you’re a [expletive] cesspool of communist [expletives]. You can bet your stinking [expletive] that I’ll never bring my money to your anti-American town. [EXPLETIVE] YOU.” That was among the comments from off-islanders, several of them profane and all condemning the Bainbridge Island community as a whole for the actions of a few in what shall hereafter be referred to as The Incident.

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  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

Commit more to building good trails

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:31PM

The machete and the mattock. They make fine instruments in the cause of public service, as anyone who’s volunteered on a trail construction crew might tell you. Once a month for some time now, a cadre of volunteers has been turning out to forge new paths through Blakely Harbor Park and other forested public areas, working to improve our network of non-motorized connections. Where intrepid islanders have gained expertise through experience, we now have a chance to learn from the Seabies (“Treebies”?) of the off-road world. As reported last week, a crew from the International Mountain Bike Association will be on the island for a few days, here to teach local folks the finer art of trail building.

Theater gives needed forum for dissent

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

There is a saying: “The object of oratory is not truth, but persuasion.” That is, to cite an instance readily at hand, the implicit aim whenever the editorialist takes up the pen. And it’s why the reader takes up the editorialist’s dare and considers what flows forth. That is free speech, free inquiry, free exchange. That is America. Nobody should doubt for a minute that filmmaker Michael Moore is out to change minds -- and votes -- with his latest work, “Fahrenheit 9/11,” a spirited critique of the second Bush presidency, its post-Sept. 11 anti-terrorism policies, and the invasion of Iraq. As reported in these pages on Wednesday, the film is setting local box-office records in its first-week run at Lynwood Theatre.

Another year, another auction record

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

As it went in the bicycle department, so it went in most other corners of last Saturday’s Rotary Auction and Rummage. Over the nine-day drop-off period, an estimated 500 bikes of varying vintage were wheeled into the auction site at Woodward Middle School. About 100 of the machines proved to be junk, and went straight into the scrap metal tote for recycling in Gorst. The remaining 400, volunteers say, were not just rideable, but of generally good quality; perhaps 100 of those were really quite nice, setting off a stampede of hopeful riders when the auction rope dropped at 8 a.m.

Another memorial milestone

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

Not a week goes by, it seems, without some promising development on the Pritchard Park/Internment Memorial front. For those who may have missed the Bainbridge Island City Council’s deliberations Wednesday, we can report that efforts to construct a memorial to the World War II Japanese American relocation took another significant stride. By resolution, the council formalized its partnership with the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community in developing the Taylor Avenue site, and authorized the use of $500,000 in previously secured grant funding – part of a $1.48 million award from the state – for early-phase permitting and site preparation.

Ferry access: build for a better future

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

How long are we expected to live in fear? We ponder that question as Washington State Ferries, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Washington State Patrol implement a more stringent security regime around vessels and docks. Officials this week announced the introduction of more explosives-sniffing dogs and, depending on the state of national maritime alert, the resumption of random vehicle searches briefly seen in 2002. Some areas aboard the vessels will be more prominently marked as “Restricted Access,” new monitor cameras will be seen at terminals, and security sweeps are already being stepped up.

Stepping up, paying up for public schools

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

“Fund drive.” The term implies a discrete event, finite in duration and devised with a specific goal or purpose in mind. Yet where the needs of our public schools are concerned – in this age of shaky state and federal support, and often burdensome educational mandates – fund-raising has by necessity become a year-round pursuit. It is nice to see that the community is stepping up splendidly. We can safely conclude such, after reviewing year-end totals of cash and equipment donations compiled by the Bainbridge Island School District, and passed along to the editor’s desk this week. Predictably heading the list are BEST, the Bainbridge Public Schools Trust, the Parent-Teacher Organizations – the institutional face of our private support for public schools.

How far might we go for traffic safety?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

It’s an image that was at once amusing and frustrating, and ultimately telling. Police Chief Matt Haney, having set up at the roadside in a patrol vehicle to look at traffic conditions at local highway intersection, sees a passing driver commit an infraction – but traffic is so bad, he can’t enter the lane to make a stop. The lights and siren are held in check, in observance of the patrol officer’s credo to “never create a hazard greater than the one you’re trying to correct.” And off scoots the miscreant motorist, scot-free. It was one of the more illustrative items to come out during a committee roundtable this week between police, bicycle safety advocates and City Council members. Newly compiled traffic statistics show that while traffic enforcement – as measured by citations – is up, so too are automobile collisions on local roadways. Safety concerns come to the forefront of community and police attention, after several near-fatal crashes along the highway this year, and general frustration in some neighborhoods that speeds are too high. While viewpoints are varied and diffuse – Too much traffic on the highway? Posted speeds too high? Ineffective policing? Lousy drivers? – bike safety advocates reserve a special pique for chatterboxes who can’t make even it to the bridge without a squawk on the cell-phone – a problem they contend will only get worse, as mobile phones become yet more pervasive and service around the island improves. Advocates are girding their views with research on local ordinances against cell-phone use by drivers, and insurance company campaigns to urge the drivers they cover to keep hands on wheel and mind on road. Their concern coincides with a police observation that vehicle speed isn’t necessarily the problem, at least on the highway; driver inattention is. And driver inattention is already a ticketable offense. Yet the infraction is by its nature reactive; nobody’s ever cited for driving with a wandering mind until it actually causes a problem – a vehicle goes off the road, property is damaged, or a bicyclist is struck from behind and lands 85 feet down the road, as happened to Chris Stanley.

Back for your island summer

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

The novelty of folks actually living on Bainbridge Island year-round wore off a few decades back, when we were “discovered” by the outside world and the creep of population began to set in. But there was a time when the island population saw an noticeable surge every June, July and August, as mainlanders showed up to air out their summer cottages and spend a few months in these “remote” environs. (A few of their abodes still dot the island; we now call them “affordable housing.”)

Save jobs first, wages second in food fight

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

It’s one thing to trumpet one’s victories. But a little perspective is usually in order, too. Since last December, the lead item on the Inlandboatmen’s Union website has proudly declared, “Union Ferry Workers Vindicated.” The notice celebrates a labor board ruling that favored then-current contract provisions for shipboard food service employees. Fine, but vindication doesn’t pay the rent, and perhaps it’s time the IBU changed the headline to reflect the current state of affairs: “Ferry Galley Workers Unemployed.”

High gas prices another reason to shop locally

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

As if shelling out well over $2 per gallon for gasoline isn’t crazy enough as the nation’s fuel situation worsens, we trust other Bainbridge denizens are thinking what we’re thinking: that the days of free-for-all motoring are finally on the wane. It’s not like the extra cost at the pump is going to something worthwhile, like a gasoline tax for road improvements. So on principle alone, the threat of $3-a-gallon gasoline on the summer horizon should give us reason enough to reconsider everything from planned vacation road trips to our periodic shopping expeditions to the big-box retailers of Silverdale.

Few Memorial Days left to win battle with time

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

Of the 140,000 people who flooded the “other Washington” last Saturday for the dedication of the National World War II Memorial, one unknown soldier stands out. We crossed paths with him in Baltimore Washington International Airport on a flight from Phoenix. As a pack of harried travelers bunched in the aisle behind him, impatient but unusually polite, the crew helped the elderly gentleman to a wheelchair. He was in distinctively military garb; pinned to cap and jacket were dozens of medals. To the trained eye, those medals charted the course of a 60-year-old war, and the experiences of a young American called to serve. To the rest of the passengers, for whom that story was blurry at best, they announced an old soldier, come to the capitol for what fellow veteran Sen. Bob Dole called “our final reunion.”

A good week for local land conservation

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:30PM

It’s a good week for land conservation when a million-dollar open space purchase is overshadowed by another, larger deal entirely. So with the first phase of the Pritchard Park/internment memorial purchase (relayed on the front page), we’d be remiss if we didn’t note the City Council’s approval, as expected, of public acquisition of the 49-acre Peters property next to Gazzam Lake.

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