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Archive Results — 20076 thru 20100 of about 22625 items

Searching for a sense of place

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

His pursuit of America’s shared narrative takes Egan on a yearly, 40,000-mile trek.
For Timothy Egan, the quintessential American road trip is a search for “place,” for geography overlaid with a shared apprehension of the historical and psychological terrain. Egan, a Seattle author who is a national reporter for the New York Times, brings Puget Sound landscapes into focus and turns an incisive eye on the larger West in works that include “The Good Rain: Across Time and Terrain in the Pacific Northwest” (1990); “Breaking Blue” (1992); and “Lasso the Wind: Away to the New West” (1999).

Merchants lobby for Ericksen, Hildebrand connection

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A petition drive on store counters reaps 400 signatures.
In past years, when the question of joining Ericksen Avenue and Hildebrand Lane has come up, officials have usually heard from one constituency: Ericksen residents saying “no.” Now they’re hearing from another: Hildebrand merchants and customers saying “yes.” The dynamic between residential and commercial interests came into relief this week, when the City Council was presented with petitions bearing some 400 signatures, calling for a formal connection between the two Winslow streets. Signatures were primarily gathered on the counters of Hildebrand businesses. “There is a need we’ve heard, to deal with this pretty quickly,” said Kevin Dwyer, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce, which sponsored the petition.

Economic diversity is on the wane

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

A report says the island is getting more affluent, housing choices disappearing.
After waiting nine years, Madeline Johnson is finally getting an affordable home of her own – by moving off-island. “It’s like moving my life,” Johnson said. “(But) if I didn’t, I wouldn’t have this home.” Johnson’s situation reflects the findings of a just-released report from the mayor’s 2004 Affordable Housing Task Force, which found that affordable housing programs established by the city in 1997 have not been effective. The report will be presented at a special Affordable Housing Forum at City Hall at 6 p.m. May 19.

Learning about each other

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The Homework Club helps island Native American students.
Adaline Rapada couldn’t have a more rapt audience. As the sixth-grader reads from her Scholastic Magazine article about the upcoming Olympic games in Athens, Greece, Bainbridge High School junior John Emau kneels on the Ordway library floor next to her chair and listens attentively. “Greece will face many challenges when Olympic games return home this summer, but as the originator of the games, Greece has unbeatable...qualifications,” Rapada reads with ease, hesitating only when she comes to the last word.

House egged? Call Poulsbo PD -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

The arrest of three Poulsbo-area teens on vandalism charges this week has the Poulsbo Police Department searching for more victims, including those on Bainbridge Island. The boys, all age 17, admitted May 5 to egging cars, street signs and mailboxes during several sprees over the last two weeks. In total, about 300 eggs – 25 dozen – were thrown in neighborhoods around North Kitsap High School and on Bainbridge.

Those yellow school buses go green

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Retrofitting to trap particulates, burn cleaner fuel means less noxious exhaust.
One ride to school, hold the exhaust. School bus emissions have gotten cleaner, through a recently completed retrofit of some Bainbridge Island School District vehicles using cleaner-burning fuel. “You don’t see the black stuff (in the exhaust),” Bainbridge school bus driver Bill “Mr. Bill” Ehrhardt said. “Just mostly transparent, and it doesn’t smell as bad. It’s like walking behind a regular car – smells better than unleaded gas.”

The joy of the ‘Superstar’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

BHS theater brings the 1960s musical ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ to the BPA stage.
Jesus kneels before Pontius Pilate, hands cinched together, head crowned with thorns. While the crowd urges Pilate to crucify him, the Roman ruler of Judea questions the religious rebel. “What do you want, Jesus, tell me,” Pilate, played by BHS senior Jenny Black says, “...Why do you not speak when I have your life in my hands?” Knowing the end of the story doesn’t lessen the drama of moment, as the scene builds to the crucifixion, the climax of “Jesus Christ Superstar,” opening here May 13.

Mayor to nominate manager of choice

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Kordonowy will proffer Mary Jo Briggs at tonight’s council meeting.
Mayor Darlene Kordonowy is poised to fill her second senior management position in as many weeks. At tonight’s City Council meeting, Kordonowy will formally nominate Mary Jo Briggs as the city’s next administrator. The appointment follows council confirmation two weeks ago of Matt Haney as police chief. Briggs currently serves as city administrator for Fairview, Ore., a fast-growing suburb on Portland’s east side. The city of 9,000 near the Columbia River has an annual budget of $20 million. She emerged as one of two favorites, after interviews of four finalists by panels of citizens, city staff and council members; following those sessions, Kordonowy then met with Briggs twice individually.

Top fiddle at last

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

BMA hands out music scholarships.
Try, try again is the mantra of every musician, and Trubee Davison’s third try paid off. The young violinist took first place in Bainbridge Music and Arts’ string competition, after finishing second the last two years. “I was really excited,” said Davison, a junior at Bainbridge High School. “Music and Arts is a really good experience to compete and get input from judges. That’s more important (than winning).”

Historic preservation board set

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:11PM

Members will review nominees for a local register of historic homes.
Historic preservation is in Bainbridge’s future. A new, seven-member Bainbridge Island Historic Preservation Commission will promote the retention of older homes and structures through tax breaks and education. “History is what makes a place special,” said Sarah Lee, commission chair. “It makes you feel attached to, or part of what was there before.” The group met for the first time on Tuesday. Member Linda Costello, an architect frequently involved with historic preservation efforts, says commissioners were unanimous in their goal. “We all agreed that we wanted to be positive,” Costello said. “A lot of people are afraid of ‘preservation,’ thinking they will be fined, penalized or guilt-tripped. I hope (homeowners) will see the register as a benefit.”

Five earn park grants –– News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Five local organizations have received more than $30,000 in funding from the Bainbridge Island Parks Foundation. The awards “will enhance recreational opportunities of Bainbridge Island citizens,” park planner Perry Barrett said. “These outstanding projects stand testament to the imagination, hard work and community consensus necessary to take a dream to fruition,” he said.

Ranger Gawlik to the rescue

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Junior Girl Scout earns Bronze Award for promoting parks.
Taylor Gawlik combined a long-time family pursuit with a gift for public speaking to earn the Bronze Award, the Junior Girl Scouts’ highest achievement. Gawlik, a Sakai fifth-grader and a scout in Susie Cook’s Troop 911, has addressed groups ranging from the Boy Scouts to Bainbridge firefighters to enlist volunteers for state parks here – a community service Gawlik and her family have long performed.

Burglar smashes library artwork, steals donations

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

A 16-year-old island boy was arrested Wed­nes­­day, police say.
A burglar smashed his way into the Bainbridge Library Tuesday night, then damaged a unique work of art to steal cash contributions made to the library. Police arrested a 16-year-old male suspect Wednesday afternoon, shortly after a witness came forward and linked him to the crime, De­tective Scott An-der­son said. The youth remained in custody at the Kitsap juvenile facility Thursday. Dam­aged in the break-in was a 6-foot-tall, papier maché giraffe just inside the li­brary en­trance.

Churches unite ‘on the side of love’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Gay marriage is explored in a forum by two ‘affirming’ congregations.
Shay Reed and his partner Warren had been together for nearly a decade, when they learned last February that gay men and lesbian women in San Francisco were being married, followed, within weeks, by same-sex couples in Oregon’s Multnomah County. The long-inaccessible state-sanctioned union was suddenly a real possibility for the committed couple, North Kitsap residents who belong to Bainbridge’s Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and who are raising a son together.

No worries, but lots to fret about

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Young singer/songwriter has been strumming since age 8.
At a time in life when many teens struggle for self-definition, Lana McMullen knows she’s on the road to her future. A freshman at Bainbridge High School, McMullen sings her original compositions at the park district’s First Fridays concert on May 7, accompanying herself on guitar. “I’ve always really loved music since I was really little,” McMullen said. “And then I was really influenced by country music when I was growing up, because Shania Twain played the guitar and I was obsessed with her.”

Roundabout gets a trim -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

City works crews took up planter strips around the Madison roundabout last week, replacing tall vegetation to improve driver visibility and pedestrian safety. Pulled up were stands of Oregon grape, which when fully mature can grow to six feet in height, said Lance Newkirk, operations manager for public works. “As the original Oregon grape plantings grew taller and taller, staff began receiving calls from citizens regarding pedestrians entering the crosswalks being harder and harder to see,” Newkirk said. “Staff received calls from parents of younger school children concerned that their kids, because of their smaller stature, were getting lost in the vegetation.”

Bomb threat clears school

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

A reward may be offered for information on the perpetrator.
A hand-written bomb threat cleared Woodward Middle School of students for hours Monday. The threatening note was found by a student in the school commons just before 10 a.m., Bainbridge Police Lt. Phil Hawkins said. It was turned over to an administrator, with district officials and law enforcement notified in turn. Because the note was credible enough to raise suspicions, students were evacuated and a multi-agency bomb squad was brought in, including explosives-sniffing dogs from Bangor.

Four decades of pint-sized patrons

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Bainbridge Cooperative Nursery School celebrates 40 years in operation.
Adults know they’re on kid turf. As one stoops to pass beneath the child-size bamboo arch that marks the gate of Bainbridge Cooperative Nursery School – the island’s oldest preschool, which celebrates its 40th anniversary May 13 – one enters a play-and-learn paradise. The yard might make even the grumpiest grownup long to shed a few decades and clamber aboard the beached sailboat dubbed “The Creamsicle” or scale the small cliff of old tires.

Thrivers, not survivors

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Islanders race, rally against breast cancer in popular events.
Facing her first checkup after completing breast cancer treatment, Su Reith told her husband she’d be fine by herself. Unannounced, her son appeared at the ferry dock; only then did she realize how frightened she was. “I was very touched,” Reith said. “It was so endearing to have him. (He said), ‘I just didn’t want you to be alone.’” No one walks alone in the Race for the Cure, which benefits the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. “Thrivers” like Reith and Deb Maier, and the Race for the Cure and other fund-raisers, draw out compassion and support from family, friends and neighbors. The American Cancer Society estimates that 215,990 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the U.S. – 4,040 in Washington state – with 40,110 succumbing to the disease.

Early bloomers play Arts Walk

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Everything will be coming up roses in downtown Winslow this Sunday. Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities Council’s quarterly Arts Walk, “Roses are Red,” will see visitors serenaded by the young musicians of Cellomania and the Bainbridge Island Youth Orchestra. Visual work by local talents will be on display at 30 stores on and around Winslow Way. Offerings include oil paintings, watercolors, fabric collages, photography, jewelry, textile arts, etchings and even a “funk fashion show,” 1 p.m. at Gallery Fraga.

Scott to leave school board –– News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Bainbridge Island School Board member Mike Scott will vacate his District Five post June 30. Scott’s resignation from the board, two years into his four-year term, was announced at Thursday’s meeting. It was necessitated by his planned move to downtown Winslow; board policy requires that members reside in the district they represent.

Indoors and out

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

The Dernbachs’ residence revels in its waterfront locale, ambience.
Staff Writer Rick and Kathy Dernbach’s deck was the view seat for Tuesday’s storm. Black clouds moved in; as thunder growled and the wind freshened, scudding whitecaps offshore created the illusion of forward motion, as if the jutting deck topped a schooner rather than the Manitou Beach home. The impression was reinforced by the configuration of the site, which features a wide swath of lawn that eddies around islands of driftwood, rock and pampas grass as it falls away toward the water.

Boost wetland, stream protection, panel says

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

Wider buffer proposals will be considered next by the City Council.
Saying local regulations are less stringent than those of other area cities, a citizen panel this week called for better protection of island streams and wetlands. In any event, committee members said, the city should err on the side of caution. “There’s something called ‘the precautionary principle,’ and there’s also something else called ‘the preservation of island life,’” committee member Cara Cruickshank told the City Council’s land use committee. “Our hearts are in this... We love this place, and we want to see it preserved.”

Mayor, police get their man

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

City Council confirms Matt Haney as chief.
What the resume didn’t accomplish, the interview did. By a 6-1 vote, the Bainbridge Island City Council Wednesday confirmed the nomination of Matt Haney as chief of police. Council members, who had been split on the nomination, cited Haney’s impressive handling of a three-hour, closed-door grilling – including his admission that he has made mistakes and has more to learn – for winning their favor. “I found that very human, and I appreciate human-ness,” chair Christine Rolfes said. Lone dissenter was Bill Knobloch, who missed the council’s interview of Haney but questioned the nominee’s “seasoning.”

Iris blooms for housing board benefit

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:10PM

The noted flute quartet performs at Grace Church.
If poverty-stricken Schubert were alive today, he would not be able to afford a house on Bainbridge – but his music will help make that possible for others. Playing the music of Schubert, Haydn and Oswald, the Iris Quartet performs May 2 in a benefit for the Housing Resources Board, a nonprofit group dedicated to creating affordable housing on the island. “It is a celebration to bring the organization and affordable housing into focus and the public eye,” said islander Janet See, flutist.

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