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Archive Results — 19951 thru 19975 of about 25275 items

Voters can’t readily judge their judges

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:20PM

Two of the most important votes Washingtonians will cast on Nov. 5 are for contested positions on the Washington Supreme Court. The sad but unavoidable truth is that the vast majority of those votes will be completely uninformed. We are not suggesting that the state’s voters are ignorant or capricious. But they can’t effectively see what judges do.

City gets a shiner while mayor ducks

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:20PM

It’s hard to have vision when you’re squinting through a black eye. More’s the shame when the shiner is in part self-inflicted, as the city seems to have managed with proposed regulations for Bainbridge Island shorelines. Ducking all punches so far has been Mayor Darlene Kordonowy. She ought now to step forward, and either put up her dukes or throw in the towel before the city is thumped into a concussion around her.

State finances so bad they could improve

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:20PM

Phil Rockefeller dropped by our office this week to catch us up on a number of things. He’s running hard for a third term, he said, and is buoyed by his 60-plus percent showing in the primary. Which prompted us to wonder aloud why anyone would want to go back to Olympia this fall to tackle what looks like a $2 billion budget deficit for the next biennium.

Let’s not flush an affordable neighborhood

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:20PM

For most of the folks present at Thursday’s update on the south-end sewer saga, the news was good. Kitsap County Sewer District 7, which operates the Fort Ward treatment plant, does have the capacity to accommodate the four south-end neighborhoods that have asked for sewers. Costs can be allocated in such a way that those who don’t want to hook up now can defer the vast majority of their expenses until later. The costs of roughly $30,000 per home are feasible. And the city council seems willing to move ahead. But for the folks from Emerald Heights, the news was a disaster.

Shorelines: the trouble with trees

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:20PM

Trees are a curious commodity. We islanders find them priceless – our gold standard, it seems, is green – but we invariably wish that our neighbors had even more of them than we have ourselves. We hold them to be beyond mere monetary value, yet they bring out the economic determinist in us all.

Finally, a good reason not to kill your TV

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

We can think of many reasons to dislike cable television. Cost comes to mind. Then there’s programming. And, of course, the tendency of the medium itself to root rumps to sofas, causing good limbs to atrophy and numbing otherwise curious minds into stupor and inertia. Other than that, cable’s great. And as reported earlier this week, islanders have cause to actually celebrate the buyout of the local cable franchise by mega-provider AT&T.

How shall we remember that bitter day?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Sometimes in this column, we are the voice of the community. Often we’re just one voice among many. And occasionally, we gladly defer to the wisdom of our island neighbors. This is one of those days. As we contemplated how best to commemorate the terrible attacks on our nation of a year ago today – struggling for words of relevance, of meaning, for a day that still largely defies comprehension – we opened the mail and found these comments from reader Bob Satterwhite. We found great wisdom in his thoughts, and we want to use this space to share them with readers.

Appleton in 23rd primary; Inslee for 1st District

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Call us parliamentary democrats (small d) at heart. We like elections that are about policies, not personalities. We like candidates who aren’t afraid to take stands. But because we don’t buy the myth that government can deliver more services at less cost, we’re particularly impressed with candidates who are willing to acknowledge the consequences of the stands they take.

Value of labor not measured in money

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Labor was very much in the news this holiday weekend, in the traditional sense of labor vs. management. A baseball strike was averted at the last minute. Teacher strikes in some districts appear likely, as does a machinist walkout at Boeing. The issue in those dust-ups is money – the workers think their services are worth more than they are receiving.

Yes for parks; Alvarado for treasurer

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

We believe the time for rhetoric is long past. At issue: a $4.92 million levy to fund Bainbridge Island Park and Recreation District maintenance and operations for the years 2003-04. The levy would be collected once, next year.

Happy 45th to our anchor and mirror

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

In 1957, rock ‘n’ roll was being born, Chevrolet was producing what may have been its finest cars, and a bunch of Bainbridge businessmen decided that “what was needed was a new supermarket, with ample off-street parking.” Led by J. Holger “Cap” Christensen, they incorporated, sold stock and built a state-of-the-art “super” market on Winslow Way, which they leased to three men who grew up in the grocery business – John and Mo Nakata and Ed Loverich. They named their business “Town and Country Thriftway.”

Island-wide issues lose their resonance

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

We are deafened, if such can be fairly stated, by the shrugging of shoulders. Asked their preference as to how the island should be redistricted for selection of future city council members, the electorate has responded with a resounding and nearly unanimous vote: indifference.

Moratoriums need a much harder look

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Are we making progress by standing still? The chief topic before the city council this month will be moratoriums of different sorts. Tonight, the council will consider extending its halt to applications for new docks, piers and bulkheads; on deck in two weeks is the public hearing required to support the recently imposed moratorium on new subdivision applications. City planners sought the moratoriums for breathing room while regulations are being developed (in the case of shorelines) or defended (with subdivisions). Both were adopted with relatively little discussion.

Some sit in the stands; Our man in D.C.

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

When Tom Hujar emerged from the dugout this week, he headed straight for the stands. Hujar says his group Parents for Better Parks won’t be throwing any high heat at the upcoming park levy for operations and maintenance; neither will it go to bat in support.

Open space: Let's talk first, fight later

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

It’s too predictable. The Washington Supreme Court invalidates an open-space requirement similar to Bainbridge Island’s ordinance. The city passes a quick moratorium, then digs in for defense. City calls its lawyers. Developers call their lawyers. All express hope for peace, and gird for war.

Maybe it's time to catch our breath

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Last week, the city’s chief money guy, Ralph Eells, gave the council a rosy rundown on the first six months of the year. Income is over budget. Expenses are under budget. Cash reserves are strong. With the new mid-year financial reports, and the attempt to get more folks thinking about the city budget, we relay his comments here. And while the news is good – certainly better than the alternative of excess spending or low revenue – it’s not quite as unusual as it might appear. As Eells explained to us, the apparent “surplus” is a fairly common feature of government, and especially of Bainbridge Island government. It’s a matter of budgeting revenue conservatively.

Of two minds on four islands for Madison

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

If, heaven forbid, a pedestrian were struck down at Winslow Way and Madison Avenue, could aid crews reach them in a timely manner? Perhaps not, Bainbridge fire officials argue – and they cite, ironically enough, the planned construction of four pedestrian “refuge islands” in the Madison Avenue center lane in the vicinity of city hall. Over on today’s op-ed page, our three-member fire board weighs in against the traffic-calming project that was approved by the city council last month.

Preserving non-city gets more difficult

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

For the last decade or more, since all-island cityhood and the passage of the state’s Growth Management Act, Bainbridge Island has lived in a legal limbo. Legally, we are a city. But in our hearts, there’s still a good bit of country, wanting as we do our farms, fields and trees.

What's left to debate on sewers?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

The obvious metaphor would be “wading into a cesspool.” Undaunted, or at least amply girded with hip waders, we hereby slosh forward on the issue of south-end sewers. We’re pleased to report that the Bainbridge City Council took a step forward this week in approving a $120,000 contract for preliminary engineering work on sewers for Emerald Heights, Rockaway Beach, Pleasant Beach and Point White. But the council once again punted on the volatile issue of whether all folks within the geographic service areas must help pay the costs to lay the lines.

Pare down the 'to-do' list

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

The announcer at our Grand Old Fourth parade gamely described one political candidate, striding confidently down Winslow Way, as being for “good jobs” and “good education” in Kitsap County. And indeed, we thought, what fine things to be for...until we asked ourselves whether we could recall any candidate ever being against jobs or education, at least in so many words.

Focus on problems, not enemies

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:19PM

Noted editorial columnist William Raspberry recently gave a commencent speech at North Carolina State University, recycling his thoughts as a syndicated column. “The best advice I can give those who would change – who would improve – our world,” Raspberry told graduates, “is to learn the difference between problems and enemies.”

Now you can be bullish on Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

You don’t have to die to leave your community a better place. In fact, that’s now just one of a half-dozen options you have to invest in the island’s future, under a new tax-exempt charity called the Bainbridge Island Community Endowment. As Ed Kushner describes it: “It’s one of the basic building blocks of the community. We’re just redesigning it, so it’ll work better for everyone.”

It's a driving mess doozy

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

To school district officials and, no doubt, many Bainbridge High School students, driving a car is an important part of making the transition from childhood to adulthood. And while the officials might prefer that students ride the bus, they can’t require them to do so, the district says.

Enough talk on Ericksen -- let's move on

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

A riddle: What’s the difference between God and a doctor? Answer: God doesn’t think he’s a doctor. Another riddle: What’s the difference between an engineer and a city council member? Answer:....

Problems of Dickensian measure

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

“You don’t consider me ill-used when I pay a day’s wages for no work.” The words of Dickens’ beloved Scrooge, uttered to his down-at-heels bookkeeper Bob Cratchit one holiday eve of yore, came back to us this week after seeing the results of the latest state audit of Bainbridge Island city finances.

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