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Archive Results — 19951 thru 19975 of about 22650 items

Mobile home park is a done deal

  • Nov 2, 2004 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 5:22PM

The residents of Islander Mobile Home Park often describe the last six months as a roller-coaster ride. Yesterday, their ride ended. “I feel exhilarated. I feel stunned,” said Bill Isley, who has helped lead his neighbors toward owning their homes. “It’s been a race, its been a battle, its been a roller-coaster. It hasn’t sunk in yet, but I’m glad it’s over.”

Council favors more bike/ped spending

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

It’s not often you see one dollar instantly turn into four. But trails advocate John Grinter witnessed it with glee at last week’s City Council budget workshop, when the council voted to nearly quadruple funding for trails, bike lanes and sidewalks. The move gave Grinter hope he may nail the target he’s had his sights on since his son was born.

Islanders can't wait to cast their ballots

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

The Election Day flood had nothing to do with yesterday’s heavy rain. The greater downpour came from island voters spilling into polling places and clogging ballot boxes. “They flooded in when we opened and it’s been constant ever since,” said poll worker George McKinney as he helped voters cram ballots into large blue boxes at the Bainbridge Performing Arts Playhouse yesterday morning.

Ferry security funding sought -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Rep. Jay Inslee (D-Bainbridge Island) wants the Department of Homeland Security to reimburse the state for $121,000 in overtime costs associated with providing troopers and bomb-sniffing dogs at the ferry terminals. The Washington State Patrol’s request for the reimbursement was recently denied by the federal government, on grounds that Washington state was in “non-orange” alert status when the overtime costs were incurred, from April 22 to Aug. 2.

Police warn of creep in truck -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Bainbridge Police are seeking information on suspicious incidents in which a man in a pickup truck approached youths waiting for their school buses this week. The first incident was reported at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at Wyatt Way and Lovell Avenue, when a middle-school-aged girl reported that a suspicious man pulled up and offered her a ride.

Lawyer: Teen to plead guilty in crash

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

A 14-year-old Bainbridge girl, behind the wheel of a speeding SUV that crashed and killed another teen in August, will plead guilty to vehicular homicide at her juvenile court arraignment next Thursday, her attorneys said. The defendant, who is not being named in the newspaper because she is a minor, faces a maximum sentence of nine months in juvenile prison if convicted.

City of Tacoma News: Tacoma City Council

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

1. Council to vote on rate increases for water, sewer and solid waste; 2. City Council to hold public hearing on the 2005 Property Tax Levies; 3. City may spend $30,000 on City Manager search; 4. Grant would help fund Tacoma’s Weed and Seed program; 5. Legislative policy goals and budget process lead study session agenda; 6. Planning Commission hearing set for 2005-2010 Capital Facilities Program; 7. City offices closed Nov. 11.

Inslee finds ferry threat 'sobering'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Congressman Jay Inslee said he will try to obtain federal funding for even more bomb-sniffing dogs at ferry terminals, in the wake of FBI reports that the Washington State Ferries have been under surveillance by suspected terrorists as recently as May 10. Inslee, a Bainbridge Island Democrat, was briefed on the confidential FBI report last Wednesday.

Oil spill touches Bainbridge shores

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Oil that spilled in South Puget Sound last week lapped at the shores of Bainbridge Island but is not expected to significantly impact wildlife or habitat. A thin sheen of oil was first sighted Friday off Restoration Point and spread to Eagle Harbor and the island’s south shore over the weekend, according to city officials and state Department of Ecology reports.

Unlikely allies band to oppose I-872

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

An initiative to change the state’s new primary is riding high on a wave of voter discontent, with some polls showing about 67 percent pledging support for the measure. But a coalition of unlikely allies hopes to unmask Initiative 872 as restrictive to voter freedoms and harmful to third parties. Democrats, Republicans, Greens and Libertarians oppose I-872’s Louisiana-style system that would advance the two top vote-getters to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. The two major parties say I-872 would unfairly favor incumbents and limit choices in voting districts. Third-party candidates say the the initiative would dramatically reduce their chances of advancing to the general election.

Security stepped up at Winslow terminals

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

More state troopers and bomb-sniffing dogs went to work screening cars and passengers at Washington State Ferry terminals starting this week, meeting a U.S. Coast Guard deadline to boost ferry security system-wide. The heightened security comes as officials acknowledged concerns about the vessels being vulnerable to attacks, and amidst new reports that the ferry system is under surveillance by terrorist groups and individuals, according to FBI documents obtained by a Seattle newspaper and published over the weekend.

Backers tout I-884 fund -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

This November, Bainbridge residents may find a school funding boost through the ballot box. Initiative 884 could swell the Bainbridge School District’s coffers by $1.2 million if the statewide measure passes Nov. 2, according to local supporters. “We’ve had an erosion of funding in preschools, in K-12 and in higher education,” said Elaine VonRosenstiel, island resident and co-founder of the League of Education Voters. “We have a crisis at all levels.”

Analysts wary of e-voting

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Elections officials should heed warnings from computer experts that new voting machines could produce worse results than hanging chads, local elections analysts said Thursday. “The new technology is fast and we all know computers are supposed to solve all our problems,” said Doug Pibel, an editor with the Bainbridge-based YES! Magazine, who has written extensively about electronic voting. “But (computers) are also good at (giving us) glitches and inexplicable outcomes.”

Turning on lightbulbs in students' minds

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:21PM

Bainbridge schools have a new science curriculum, but the next levy may determine its effectiveness. New textbooks and inquiry-based methods need the support of laptop computers and digital cameras -- which would be funded by next February’s capital levy -- to be fully utilized. “Right now, I can only do 30 percent of this lab because I don’t have the equipment,” said Enrique Chee, Bainbridge High School physics teacher and science department head. “It’s not just me. We as a science department are relying heavily on this tech levy. We’re gambling.”

Island needs another boat yard, backers say

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

An old rule dredged from the 1970s has the Bainbridge Harbor Commission eyeing a state-owned Eagle Harbor property as a future public-use boat yard. “It would enhance the viability of our community,” said Harbor Commissioner Rob Jacques at Tuesday’s commission meeting. “Boats could refuel and repair locally without having to go somewhere else. It would be attractive to downtown and add diversity to the waterfront.”

Mobile home park deal in flux -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

Resident purchase of the Islander Mobile Home Park in Winslow appears to be back on, after new negotiations with developer Kelly Samson over the weekend. Last Thursday, residents were told a deal they struck with Samson had been derailed and that the 6.4-acre Winslow property would pass to a group of overseas investors. But early this week, it appeared the wheels were snug on the rails again.

Why, exactly, are we a free people?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

The Founding Fathers considered the Constitution required reading; Thomas Jefferson said it was “every American’s right and obligation to read and interpret” it for himself.” Yet few contemporary Ameri­cans have read the very document that forms the bedrock of principles and values upon which the country was built. The Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities Council hopes to spark interest and familiarity with the Constitution with three lectures beginning today.

Local radio plans go off the air

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

Call it the community radio two-step. It’s a dance routine Bainbridge Island Broadcasting knows all too well. “We’ve been taking one step forward, one step backward since 1984,” said BIB board member Bob Haslanger.

WASL scores worth the wait

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

Bainbridge High School students may have gotten their scores last, but they came in first. Corrected scores for the Washington Assessment of Student Learning show that Bainbridge seventh and 10th graders nudged out Mercer Island for the top place in standardized testing statewide. The results scores had to be recalculated after their initial release two weeks ago, when the state’s scoring team mistakenly left out the scores of 46 students and skewed the results downward.

What's next for Wyckoff? -- Pritchard Park update, part 2

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

The tangle of pipes that once pulsed with steam-extracted toxins has gathered rust for over a year at the former Wyckoff property on Bill Point. The Environmental Protection Agency will likely not resuscitate the innovative steam-extraction process for subsurface contaminants, opting to cap pollutants instead.

Community fest was a first -- Pritchard Park update, Part 1

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

A Suquamish fishing camp, a timber treatment plant, a farewell port for Japanese Americans bound for internment, a Superfund clean-up site. The one-third mile of shoreline tucked between Bill Point and a marina on Eagle Harbor has been all these things, but Saturday evening’s Blackberry Festival gave about 800 people a glimpse at the site’s future role as the city’s next shoreline park.

Bush Administration honors Woodward

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

More than 600 Woodward Middle School students rose to their feet to cheer yesterday, when a U.S. Department of Education official said it is the only middle school in Washington State – and one of just 29 nationwide – to receive a Blue Ribbon award for excellence this year.

Turnout solid despite discontent

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

High turnout with only a handful of unhappy voters has Kitsap elections officials breathing a sigh of relief after Tuesday’s primary. “It went remarkably well,” said Kitsap County Auditor Karen Flynn. “We anticipated a great many people being dissatisfied with the new primary, and that there would be a drop-off in people voting.”

Bike trail goes in at schools -- News Roundup

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

Bicyclists and pedestrians celebrated the near-completion of a 3/4-mile paved trail that links Bainbridge High School to Madison and New Brooklyn. A Tuesday ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by state Sen. Phil Rockefeller, Mayor Darlene Kordonowy, and representatives from the school district, the state Department of Transportation and the bike advocacy group Squeaky Wheels.

Nethercutt spars with protesters

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:20PM

Congressman George Nethercutt didn’t find it quite so easy to barnstorm through Bainbridge, dropping a quick stump speech before breezing on to the next of many campaign stops Wednesday. First he had to contend with three high school students armed with colorful signs and an encyclopedic knowledge of the Spokane Republican’s political track record.

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