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Archive Results — 19826 thru 19850 of about 23550 items

One-stop tech shop hits island

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:58PM

Keith Kirkwood is out to rebuild computer users’ experience from the ground wires up. His new one-stop computing shop, Bainbridge Technology Solutions, sells components, builds its own PCs, and even makes house calls to help islanders faced with problems they cannot solve themselves.

The efficient, affordable home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:58PM

How can a homebuilder offer the amenities buyers want, but keep the price affordable, especially in an area of nosebleed land costs like Bainbridge Island? Perhaps by learning a lesson from car-builders, and improving worker efficiency by standardizing tasks. “People think that a house that takes a long time to build is a better house, but actually, the reverse can be true,” said Dave Smith of Central Highland Builders. “By the third time around, our carpenters know the plan by heart, and they’re hammering nails instead of reading blueprints,” Smith said. “They’ve pounded all the wrinkles out of it.”

Seabreeze is drifting away

  • Sep 23, 2003 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 6:58PM

The Winslow retail core could expand to the south side of Bjune Drive under a proposal that would replace the Seabreeze Apartments with a five-building, mixed-use complex of retail space and condominium homes. Designed by architect Sean Parker, the Seabreeze plan calls for underground parking, ground-floor retail space and up to three stories of residential living on the one-third acre lot on the southeast corner of Bjune and Madison Avenue.

Chu bids Eyeland practice farewell

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

The ophthalmologist shifts focus to training doctors in his native China.
Dr. Franklin Chu dedicated his professional life to helping islanders see clearly. Now the island ophthalmologist takes a clear-eyed look at his own future. The longtime island resident has sold his practice to Kitsap-based Pacific EyeCare, a change that takes effect Sept. 2.

New building is a family affair

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

Earl, Linda and William Miller put up mixed-use project on Madison.
The new mixed-use building nearing completion on the west side of South Madison Avenue, abutting the driveway into the Madison Retirement Center, is a do-it-yourself proposition for the Miller family.

Taking a shine to Bainbridge

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

A good car wash isn’t as simple as a pail of soapy water and a brush, says Mike Brooks, a professional in the field. And that’s especially so with the new clear-coat but easy-scratch finishes. “The so-called touchless car washes can’t get your car clean unless you start with a broom dipped in soap,” he said, “but a brush on wet dirt scratches the finishes.”

Bringing ‘em back to Winslow Way

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

There was a time when, on a busy night, you would expect to wait for a table at the bustling Winslow Way Cafe. But then-owner Tom Lathrop sold the downtown institution, and for whatever reason, the fizz went flat. No waiting. Slow business. The place was advertised for sale. No takers. Then the bartender took matters into his own hands.

Cole is the artist for the crafts

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

If you think there aren’t enough customers for your business, consider Scott Cole’s problem. He designs custom interiors for ultra-high-end yachts. With the boats costing from $4 to $20 million, one would think there aren’t too many buyers. “There are actually more than you think,” said Cole, principal in Ardeo Design. “On an international basis, there are probably more than 100 yachts bigger than 100 feet built every year.”

Cole is the artist for the crafts

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

If you think there aren’t enough customers for your business, consider Scott Cole’s problem. He designs custom interiors for ultra-high-end yachts. With the boats costing from $4 to $20 million, one would think there aren’t too many buyers. “There are actually more than you think,” said Cole, principal in Ardeo Design. “On an international basis, there are probably more than 100 yachts bigger than 100 feet built every year.”

Brewer brothers are back in business

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

How does a fresh bouquet of bowl-size dahlias in nearly every color of the rainbow sound? The Brewer brothers – Zack, age 11, and Eli, age 8 – are back in business with their new permanent dahlia stand at the Head of the Bay, where Wyatt Way turns in to Eagle Harbor Drive. “We just put up a new stand a few weeks ago,” Zack said. “Our old stand kept getting knocked down.”

Long-delayed project under way

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

A lot has happened in the past three years. The country has undergone a terrorist assault and a war. The stock market has gone south, Boeing has gone to the Midwest and the federal budget has gone into the red. One thing that hasn’t happened, though, is work on the Meridian, a condominium-plus-something sited on the north side of Knechtel Drive, west of Ericksen Avenue.

Business is on the right tack

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

There was only one way to Christina’s heart: astride a horse. Blake Wagner stayed in the saddle, and lo these many years later, the happy trail brings the couple to Bainbridge and a new tack shop for the island’s many equestrian enthusiasts. Call it a stable relationship. “(Without horses), there was no marriage going on there,” Christina Wagner says.

Island outfit sails for the Navy

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

You know how difficult it can be to get home-repair professionals to arrive on time. Imagine the problem of getting several hundred to show up together, especially if they are coming from the other side of Puget Sound Then imagine the added complication of subjecting them all to a degree of security far more intense than anything you see at an airport. That’s the challenge the U.S. Navy faces in Bremerton, where the USS Abraham Lincoln begins a year-long overhaul today at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, using personnel based mostly in Everett, the ship’s home port.

Wald returns flock, flotilla

  • Jun 18, 2003 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 6:57PM

The swans have returned to Eagle Harbor. The swan boats, that is. After a year’s hiatus, the boat rental operation on the barge at the Waterfront Park dock is again open for business, resurrected by kayaker Udo Wald. “We want this to be the new center for paddling activity,” said Wald, owner of “To the Back of Beyond” kayak shop on Winslow Way.

Angling for island sportsmen

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

The great irony of running a fishing store: there’s no time left for fishing. “I fish less now than I ever have,” said islander Jeff Waite, co-owner of Northwest Angler, which relocated to Bainbridge this month from its longtime storefront in downtown Poulsbo. Agreed business partner Troy Dettman, who manages the store and leads instructional excursions to area rivers and lakes: “You never fish while you guide. You can’t hook a fish and have your client’s stuff in a knot. It’s one of my rules.”

From the Greek isles to yours

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

If Terry Moyemont and Terri Stanley were to read one’s palm, the pair would more likely identify an exotic tree than trace a life line. The dynamic island duo – Moyemont is a noted photographer and documentary filmmaker, Stanley is a landscape designer – have opened an island greenhouse with a distinctly Mediterranean flavor. “We wanted to do something positive about life and beauty,” Stanley said, “no matter what else was going on in the world.”

Lots of offices, but few stores

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

Office space on Bainbridge Island is abundant, with a good selection in an array of price ranges. But retail space fronting on a main street or even a well-used parking lot – that’s another story, a story of considerable demand and negligible supply. “If anyone out there is listening and wants to build a project, retail is the way to go,” said Jerry Knipe of the Sunrise Group, one of the island’s leading commercial real-estate brokers.

Moving cuisine a steppe forward

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

Revolution, fugitive aristocrats, and a hero on a quest for hidden treasure. All these are woven into the tongue-in-cheek plot of “The Twelve Chairs,” a hugely popular Russian novel, and later a Mel Brooks film. Now, hopes owner Alina Gho, 12 Chairs will make a propitious moniker for her new restaurant, which began dishing up Russian cuisine in Winslow Mall last week. Gho’s personal history has a bit of a literary ring to it, too – a Horatio Alger tale of “luck and pluck.”

Upbeat eatery with Philly flair

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

One quit his day job, which was actually at a night club, and the other is still keeping banker’s hours, which may not be all that short. Between them, they found time to retool an established delicatessen from the ground up. New restaurateurs on the block are Patrick Winslade and Larry Schoeberl, co-owners of Colagreco’s Italian Style Deli upstairs at Winslow Mall. The pair purchased the business from friend Mike Gabrielli, who in March wrapped up a successful nine-year run to pursue other interests.

Embellish finds a new nook

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

Most islanders can get from their front door into downtown Winslow in a matter of a few minutes But it took Katrina McDermott six years to get downtown with her home-furnishing store Embellish, which opened last week on Madrone Lane. The neighbors are glad to see her. “The other merchants sent me flowers,” she said. “And we’re closer to lattes, which we really like.”

Currying the favor of an island

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

It’s just like Mom used to make. Vegetables seasoned with a simple, subtle blend of cumin and curry leaf; potatoes studded with mustard and chillies; leg of lamb sauced with ginger, cardamom and coriander; shrimp simmered in coconut milk – all served with smooth-spicy chutneys, and warm naan to soak up any juices that might escape the fragrant bed of basmati rice. For Indian-born Ranjit Mulgaonkar, that’s what was for dinner – the same homestyle south Indian cooking that he and his wife Dana are now dishing up at Winslow Way’s newest culinary cubby hole, Island Chat House.

No shades of gray at this boutique

  • Apr 23, 2003 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 6:56PM

The palette may be limited, but the sensibility isn’t. Bainbridge’s new clothes boutique, Noir et Blanc, proves that black-and-white garb can be stylish and sleek without being outrageously expensive. “Black and white makes everything look elegant,” said store owner Stephanie Jackson, “but I’m carrying clothes that range from cotton tee-shirts to cocktail dresses, and everything in between.”

Shooting stops, shipping starts

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:55PM

Like a number of his Bainbridge neighbors, Ed Ellis vehemently opposed the war in Iraq. For that reason, he is especially pleased at the opportunity to participate in efforts to rebuild that country. The first postwar food aid is on its way to Iraq on board a ship operated by San Juan Navigation, Ellis’s company. “I’m excited because this is something new and different with political implications,” said Ellis, who was also involved with the first agricultural shipments to Cuba. “It’s nice to be part of what is going on out there – a humanitarian effort to feed the Iraqi people.”

Pegasus soars over bear market

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:55PM

For most investors, Monday was another stock-market slaughter – Dow down 172, Nasdaq off 27, Standard & Poor’s 500 index down 21.5. But for Pegasus Investment Partners, Monday was somewhere between a wash and a slight gain. The difference – the disciplined, cautious approach of managing partner Doug Saksa. “There is no free lunch in the investment market,” he said. “Our first rule is, don’t lose money. The second rule is, don’t forget the first rule. And the third rule is, make some money when you can.”

Main Street staple in new hands

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:55PM

Saying simply that “we’re tired,” Winslow Way mainstays Janie and Stuart Walton have sold Paper Products to islanders Alyse McConnell and Klaas Hesselink, who they believe will continue the tradition of community involvement. “We’ve had several other offers, but we never felt that they would do for the community what the community needed,” Stuart Walton said.

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