Story Archives

Archive Results — 19801 thru 19825 of about 24925 items

Memorial belongs here

  • Apr 23, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

Passage of the bill that will eventually establish Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American internment memorial as a National Park Service historic site received a unanimous vote in February in the House of Representatives: 419 to 0. How times have changed, and it took only 66 years. In February 1942, the House unanimously approved — by a voice vote — an executive order that incarcerated more than 120,000 West Coast Issei and Nisei because Japan and America were at war.

Memorial belongs here

  • Apr 23, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

Passage of the bill that will eventually establish Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American internment memorial as a National Park Service historic site received a unanimous vote in February in the House of Representatives: 419 to 0. How times have changed, and it took only 66 years. In February 1942, the House unanimously approved — by a voice vote — an executive order that incarcerated more than 120,000 West Coast Issei and Nisei because Japan and America were at war.

Some postman is grooving to all our love letters...

  • Apr 23, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

A woman who worked for the German postal service in the West German town of Giessen was recently arrested and charged with having 29,000 pieces of undelivered mail at her home. The letters date from as long as 15 years ago, although most were mailed within the last five years. Postal investigators and law enforcement officers believe that the woman stole the envelopes, hoping to find money in them, although it is not yet clear how many of the letters were actually opened. A spokesman for the postal service said that the letters will all be delivered to the original addressees with a note of apology from the post office.

Affordable housing project needs help

  • Apr 26, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

Hello neighbors.

Are we ready for affordable housing?

  • Apr 26, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

Ah, the land of plenty. It had to come to this. America’s class system has been around for centuries, but the division became more obvious in the 19th century with the creation of opulent resorts, first in the east with the likes of Saratoga Springs, Palm Beach and Newport, then slowly moving west to Aspen, Jackson Hole and Carmel. What all of them had in common were beautiful settings and a work force that could not afford to live there. These days, we have a modest variation of the theme spreading in certain neighborhoods throughout the country, including Bainbridge Island, where an increasing number of the city’s workers live west of Agate Pass.

Boating safety is the island way

  • Apr 30, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

Boaters are a gregarious group. They will happily regale you with stories about adventures, idyllic cruises and enticing destinations. For generations, they’ve passed along key tips and information to new boaters either verbally or by example. That was a great way to learn how best to navigate Eagle Harbor traffic, liveaboards and the ferry’s comings and goings. Sometimes though, a newcomer’s boater education had some gaps.

City survey a waste of time and money ?

  • Apr 30, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

This just in: The majority of Bainbridge Islanders are old, well-educated, well-off, hard working, happy with the present but pessimistic about the future, worried about the island’s water supply and population growth, content with the current balance between city services and taxes, divided over the city’s performances of late concerning planning, development and its finances, want more bike lanes, walking paths, trails, affordable housing, keeping the island rural and pretty much the way it is right now.

The saddest story out there? Just look to Iraq

  • Apr 30, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:06PM

A recent study found that the average American walks about 900 miles in a year. Another study found that Americans drink, on average, 22 gallons of alcohol per year. That means, on average, that Americans get about 41 miles to the gallon. Makes you kind of proud to be an American, doesn’t it?

Revisiting Minidoka: A pilgrimage in time

  • Apr 30, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

There’s a community to which Bainbridge Island will forever be tied by history, a community with a message for every American. It’s as much a part of our island soul as Manitou Beach, Yeomalt, Restoration Point, Island Center, Blakely or Eagle Harbors, all of Port Madison, Strawberry Hill or Hermana Isla de Ometepe. I heard about Minidoka, Idaho sparingly as a student, more over the years. In 2007, I could not stay away.

Blah, blah, blah say those who fail to listen

  • May 3, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Civil discourse, long a bedrock of our democratic society, appears to have suffered a stress fracture of late. It’s difficult to ascertain the actual cause of why so many people have begun to verbally assail their fellow citizens merely because they have a difference of opinion about one topic or another. Perhaps it’s because we, the people, are frustrated by our governance and some of us have a predilection to bluster when exasperated. Whatever the cause, the result may lead to boorish behavior that is often so ludicrous that it belongs in a comedy act.

Infrastructure must be a priority

  • May 3, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Infrastructure is often referred to as the backbone of a community. We take for granted the streets we drive on, the water that comes from our faucets, and the storm drains that keep our streets from flooding. We rarely think about infrastructure until it fails.

Change? Yes, but what kind?

  • May 7, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

In the past four years I’ve attended all the meetings for the Winslow Tomorrow visioning process, participated in the charrette and attended many city presentations on the possible designs that would grow from the results of the visioning process. Lately I’ve attended many council meetings, listening to why nothing can be done to apply any of the results of this process. Partially this is due to the economic climate and partially it’s the result of the gloom-and-doomers who, without attending any meetings or reviewing the possible designs that resulted from the process, have concluded that the whole thing was an attempt to “pull the wool over the public’s eyes” to allow large-scale development of Winslow Way.

City’s financial failure must be addressed

  • May 7, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

The unfolding financial crisis at the city makes it clear that we have failed the most basic tenets of local government. The value of government is to address common needs that cannot be met by individual citizens, such as life/safety and infrastructure needs by carefully spending the tax money it receives. It is important we learn how we got into this deficit position and how we get back on a responsible fiscal track.

There’s no doubt: helmets save lives

  • May 7, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Most people have accepted the fact that a helmet is a necessary safety item whether the wearer is operating a bicycle, motorcycle, a whitewater kayak or a board of one type or another. There are exceptions, of course, including a large majority of the bicyclists in Eugene, Ore., where going helmetless on city and University of Oregon streets is the cool thing to do. Those Oregon Ducks have a tendency to live on the wild side.

Remembering Paul Ohtaki

  • May 7, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Paul Ohtaki, who grew up on Bainbridge Island and served as an internment camp reporter for the Review during World War II, passed away on April 27 at his home in San Francisco. He would have been 85 in August.

Perhaps you read about ... Happy Mother’s Day

  • May 7, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

I’ve never been there, so my impression of what Florida’s like is drawn entirely from books, films and the news stories that originate there. Among the places in Florida I’ve never been to is Melbourne, a city of some 78,000 people located midway down Florida’s eastern coast, about 60 miles southeast of Orlando. Melbourne, which served as a training ground for Confederate soldiers during the Civil War, was named in honor of its first Postmaster, a gentleman named Cornthwaite John Hector. Hector was an Englishman, but he had spent much of his life in Melbourne, Australia.

Real estate has to be the answer

  • May 10, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Words from a reformed political junkie

  • May 14, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

I had to take a break from politics this spring. Cold turkey. I just quit.

Affordable housing tough in these times

  • May 14, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Housing experts say the affordable-housing market on Bainbridge Island is so depressed that people, most of whom are looking for one- or two-bedroom spaces, have written it off and stopped looking on the island. This is especially true for families because they often need three bedrooms, which means they’re searching for rare and very expensive rental houses.

A celebration of cherry trees

  • May 14, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:05PM

Last Friday, Sakai Middle School students packed the hillside meadow around their new – and two very old – blossoming cherry trees for the First Annual Cherry Blossom Festival, and to honor the school’s soon-to-retire principal, Jo Vanderstoep.

Is there fulfillment in stuff collection?

  • May 14, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:04PM

I was in Spokane one day this past week helping my son pack up his dorm room for the summer. Adam is now a sophomore at Gonzaga University majoring in Afternoon Classes. That’s not as bad as it sounds. In another year, I’ll have a second child in college who quite possibly may be studying Advanced Tanning and Quantum Shopping Mechanics.

Rights are good for all citizens

  • May 17, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:04PM

“It can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate. “

Open space plan is more about dreams

  • May 17, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:04PM

In case you didn’t already know, the city has begun updating the 2025-30 Comprehensive Plan, its first priority being the creation of a stratagem for the future of the island’s open spaces. It’s essentially another plan within a plan, but it’s fortuitous that city leaders realize the judiciousness of protecting the island’s most valuable commodity against the threat of urban sprawl. They fear that if they don’t plan now and stick to their guns later, the almighty dollar will turn this Seattle suburb into an enlarged version of Mercer Island.

You ask, the mayor answers

  • May 21, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:04PM

At the recent Town Meeting at the American Legion Hall, a citizen suggested that I institute a column in the Review to address citizen questions – to “loop back to the people that are paying the bills” – from you, our taxpayers. This is the first of a series of columns that will address commonly asked questions, and I want to use it to respond to some of the questions about the city’s financial well-being that I heard at the meeting.

Worst job in town? Ask the mayor

  • May 21, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Jun 9, 2008 at 9:04PM

Once, at a party, the conversation was dragging a bit, when someone, asked: “What was the worst job you ever had?”

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