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Archive Results — 19601 thru 19625 of about 24900 items

It's a driving mess doozy

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

To school district officials and, no doubt, many Bainbridge High School students, driving a car is an important part of making the transition from childhood to adulthood. And while the officials might prefer that students ride the bus, they can’t require them to do so, the district says.

Enough talk on Ericksen -- let's move on

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

A riddle: What’s the difference between God and a doctor? Answer: God doesn’t think he’s a doctor. Another riddle: What’s the difference between an engineer and a city council member? Answer:....

Problems of Dickensian measure

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

“You don’t consider me ill-used when I pay a day’s wages for no work.” The words of Dickens’ beloved Scrooge, uttered to his down-at-heels bookkeeper Bob Cratchit one holiday eve of yore, came back to us this week after seeing the results of the latest state audit of Bainbridge Island city finances.

Republic won't fall over car searches

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

“Would you open your bag, please?” If you’ve been to a Seattle Mariners game of late, you know the routine of giving access to handbags and other containers before you’re allowed through the turnstile. Too, the county courthouse and the federal building. Too, for heaven’s sake, the airport. Pocket contents are disgorged, luggage inspected, a few steps taken through a scanner before admittance is allowed.

Two more reasons to support PUD

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

There are reports, and then there are reports worth sitting through. In the latter category we put the comments of David Jones, representing the Kitsap Public Utility District at Monday’s Economic Vitality Conference. Amid reports by emissaries from local communications providers Qwest and AT&T Broadband to the effect that expanding Bainbridge Internet access isn’t on their plate for the immediate future, Jones gave an update of his own: “We have been building, we are continuing to build, and we’re looking forward to it.”

Department of Loose Ends

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

In which we take a random romp through the Review mailbag, and tie up ends left dangling and frayed: Ticket-tape parade: Several weeks ago in this space, we noted the advent of “Click It or Ticket,” a law-enforcement campaign targeting motorists who, by indifference or resolve, flout the state’s mandatory seat-belt law. The campaign preceded a law change that takes effect mid-month, by which officers will be able to stop drivers specifically for lap-strap violations.

Take the long view on parking

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

While studying Winslow parking and the feasibility of a merchant-financed garage, Anthony Gibbons gave considerable thought to the relationship between people, prosperity and automobiles. As detailed elsewhere in this issue, his report dashes hopes that a garage could come courtesy of downtown property owners and merchants. Either the garage won’t happen, or it will become a city responsibility. And because the latter scenario involves your tax money, his views are worth considering.

'We've got the votes'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

We described it as “a moment of surprising candor.” The moment in question occurred during an interview with Councilman Bill Knobloch, concerning his written “request” to reduce the mayor’s role at council meetings.

Time to end nonsensical power struggle

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

There is a rule for surviving politics in a small community: Make it about the issue, not the person. Adherence to that simple maxim ensures that at the end of the day, regardless of which way the votes fall, everyone goes home friends and neighbors. Unfortunately, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to tell where issues end and personalities begin, as one watches the new city council and mayor at work. A time that should be dynamic with policy debates and initiatives of substance has instead fostered a petty turf war, leaving the council divided and, we dare say, the public embarrassed for all concerned.

Time for us all to play 'Slice the Isle'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

If you’re the type who enjoys the puzzle page in your daily newspaper, you won’t want to miss playing the Bainbridge Reapportionment Game: Follow along as the city council divides the island into equal districts, for purposes of electing council members.

Information can't vanish with paper

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

Because our job description includes letting readers know what their city officials are up to, we view our right of access to government documents with professional concern. So during a recent committee-level debate about furnishing laptop computers to city council members – said to herald a new, less wasteful age of “paper-free government” – we asked how that nirvana might include ordinary citizens.

Nothing to fear from housing choice

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

Do you have any teachers in your neighborhood? Police officers? Other public employees? We were intrigued by a report in the regional media this week, passed along to Chamber of Commerce members by Executive Director Kevin Dwyer. The story concerned an initiative for subsidized housing in another affluent island community to the east – Mercer.

Top honors for Marge Center; sunny cycling

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

Bainbridgers get pretty skittish when our comfortable little island winds up in the sights of the big, ugly world outside. Sometimes, though, it’s nice to be noticed. And this week, we’re pleased to pass along the news that our favorite community project, the Marge Williams Office Center, has been honored by the state Office of Trade and Economic Development.

What should we get for our $8 million?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

Forty acres of public open space – a half-dozen contiguous parcels, most purchased in the past year with $850,000 in city general and water utility funds – sit protected from development at the head of Eagle Harbor. Yet few folks, including the immediate neighbors, can probably say with precision where the 40 acres are, or even that they’re publicly owned.

'Food for Thought' is weighty subject

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:18PM

When we recall our warmest memories of the past, chances are that food is involved – the holiday meal with our extended family, the romantic dinner with a spouse-to-be, or the exotic fare that was the highlight of a once-in-a-lifetime vacation.

That 'nuisance' was here before you were

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

It’s a classic conflict wherever town meets country: Long-time farming (or industrial) operation gets new neighbors. Neighbors first consider operation a rustic addition to general ambience, but ultimately tire of noise, dust, odors, etc. Neighbors get (or, since this is Bainbridge, are) lawyers. Neighbors squeeze operation out of existence. As reported in this issue, that drama is playing out on the waters of Rich Passage. A commercial salmon farm – there since the early 1970s – wants to add two floating warehouse barges, allowing crews to haul in fish-food by sea, eliminate daily truck trips over Fort Ward Hill Road, and streamline handling procedures. But neighbors on the hill above and the beach below – in homes only built in the past six or seven years – take umbrage with the idea of visible, floating warehouses. The hyperbole suggests that such structures would blot out their views of the far shore and mountains, if not of the sun itself. Need we mention that litigation has already been threatened if the plan is allowed to proceed?

A good day for our Earth/Book learnin'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

Hardy and rugged they looked, tramping out of the woods on the western portion of Blakely Harbor Park. Armed with stout tools and led by the intrepid Al Philips, the able crew spent Monday morning hacking away at the green scourge of English ivy that envelops much of the park’s forested acreage. While we keep a pair of anvil pruners in our truck for just such occasions, we could only look on enviously as we drove past Philips and his outfit en route to the office.

Don't cut off conversation on planning costs

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

The concept is appealingly simple: The city should charge fees for services to those who use them, unless “provision of the specific service in question provides a general public benefit.” As reported elsewhere in this issue, a seven-person citizen committee has been tasked with applying that mandate to the question of fees charged to builders and developers.

Forget 'change,' plan for 'exchange'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

What’s all the hubbub? At Tuesday’s well-attended roundtable on the future of Winslow, talk focused on creation of a “street plan” to give us all a better idea what our urban core might look like as it fills out. We were going to praise the proposal as worthy of a little hubbub, until we recalled that that term comes from from an old Scots Gaelic interjection (“ub ub ubub”) referring to “the confused shouting of a crowd.” And that seemed more appropriate to, say, a hearing on Ericksen Avenue...which is perhaps why we need a street plan in the first place.

Speed up broadband with KPUD

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

They’ve turned their attention from the flow of water to the flow of information. So news that the Kitsap Public Utility District wants to extend its fledgling fiberoptic network across Agate Passage, into Winslow and perhaps beyond, is exciting indeed.

Click it or ticket, for safety

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

Does the freedom to neglect your own safety outweigh your responsibility to show a little common sense? Where use of our public roadways is concerned, society has decided that the answer is “no.”

Wetland exceptions not unreasonable

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

Is it reasonable use, or unreasonable abuse? As reported elsewhere in this issue, the city is taking another look at the so-called “reasonable use exception” – the policy by which construction can encroach on a wetland or other “critical area” if, without the encroachment, no construction is possible. Folks in several neighborhoods have raised the issue, alarmed at the specter of construction on swampy parcels in their area. But while there’s something to be said for re-examining policies that may be taken for granted, we’re not sure the policy as it exists is unreasonable or abusive of our island environment.

Best answer yet for vibrant downtown

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

With the same sense of hope that we greet the new baseball season, we also bid a welcome to Harbor Square, the latest incarnation of a mixed-use project that could transform the landscape of downtown Winslow. Two previous plans have been launched on the prime five-acre tract north of the ferry terminal. Both foundered – in part because of community opposition, but mostly because of the improvidence of first developer, who borrowed heavily and pledged the land as security. Those debts sank “The Landing,” as it was then known, and forced a foreclosure sale that took the parcel out of the hands of the next would-be developer as well.

Does your neighborhood still matter?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

How might the muse have visited Robert Frost, had the poet lived on Bainbridge Island? Indeed, one sees a bit less charm in the verse, “Good vegetated buffers make good neighbors.”

Council makes good move with budget

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:17PM

The city council’s plan to restructure its budget process, to increase participation both by the public and the council, itself was greeted with optimistic caution in these quarters. Our optimism arises from the basic concept. While the council is the policy-making arm of our government, the budget is where the rubber meets the road. Abstract objectives are well and good, but what the city actually does in a given year is what finds its way into the budget.

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