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Archive Results — 19451 thru 19475 of about 22375 items

Accord elusive on new regs for wetlands

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

The council is divided, with some calling for new landowner incentives. With the December 2004 deadline long past and a new May 9 goal looming, divisions over the city’s Critical Areas Ordinance update remained as the City Council took up the issue Wednesday. “It’s time for us to move forward with this,” said Councilman Bill Knobloch. “This is a wrap up, as far as I’m concerned.”

News Roundup -- Schools cut water usage/Islander wins for food, peace/Tech levy meetings set/City seeking farm expert

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

In response to Gov. Christine Gregoire’s declaration of a statewide drought emergency, the Bainbridge Island School District is cutting the water to grounds and fields by 50 percent. At Bainbridge High, Woodward and Sakai, “field irrigation systems...will not be activated until the moisture levels in the ground fall to a level that begins to cause the grass to stress,” facilities director Mike Currie said in a recent report to Superintendent Ken Crawford.

Schools face budget cuts

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

Loss of federal funding leaves some programs imperiled. If Bainbridge school officials want to preserve remedial reading programs, drug and alcohol counseling and career advice – all of which are threatened by upcoming state and federal budget cuts – they’ll have to put their thinking caps on. “I’ve always been pretty creative” when it comes to finding ways to finance important programs, Bainbridge schools Superintendent Ken Crawford said. “But our creativity is certainly being challenged, particularly when you go from little funding to nothing at all.”

Park funding in budget draft

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

Senate Democrats’ plan includes $2.5 million for Pritchard purchase. A fresh infusion of state dollars could put public purchase of the Wyckoff property at Bill Point within comfortable reach. Funding of $2.5 million for the “Pritchard Park” project is included in a budget proposal unveiled by Senate Democrats Monday.

News Roundup -- BHS teacher lost to AIDS/Low-cost clinic closes doors/Small home, big dreams/Relaying the baton for life

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

Longtime Bainbridge High School English teacher Rob Goldsworthy, who was open with his students about the challenges of living with AIDS, died from complications of the disease on Friday. He was 38. Goldsworthy was known on campus for his enthusiasm and creativity, his ability to connect with a diverse range of students, and for bringing out the best in student writers, his colleagues at the high school said.

Coming soon: Harbor Square development

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

Marketing is under way, with a groundbreaking slated for summer. Prospective buyers visiting the the 180-unit Harbor Square condominium project might be a little surprised by what’s there now: 4.3 acres choked with weeds and blackberry brambles. But groundbreaking on the upscale condominium and retail hub across the street from the Winslow ferry terminal is scheduled for August, a spokesman for the project said this week, and the first residents could move in by spring of 2006.

Clean vehicle bill still revving

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

t But the local delegation is split on the bill, now on to the Senate. The state House passed a tougher auto emissions standards bill Wednesday, similar to one proposed in the Senate by Bainbridge legislator Phil Rockefeller. The House bill would require Washington to follow California’s auto emissions rules. Auto makers would need to manufacture cleaner-running cars for sale in the state by 2009. Rockefeller’s nearly identical companion bill died in the Senate Rules Committee in late February.

Buffer proposal divides citizens

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:39PM

The council mulls an update to the city’s ordinance protecting ‘critical areas.’ Residents were crowded tight in City Hall Wednesday but were sharply divided on proposed new rules to protect the island’s wetlands, streams and other at-risk natural areas. “This ordinance will make land valueless, and that’s very hard to swallow,” said Fletcher Bay resident Rich Schmidt, echoing other landowner concerns that expanded buffers will restrict development and diminish property values.

Historian, neighbors call for Yeomalt cabin restoration

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Several criticize the park district for letting the building fall into dilapidation. The park district may hold off on dismantling the ailing Camp Yeomalt cabin, if measurable steps are made to preserve it, park officials said Thursday. “We’ve seen two false starts to try to save the cabin,” park district Director Terry Lande said. “But as long as progress is being made, the deadline can be extended.”

News Roundup -- Fare hike plan dips again/Eat salmon, help wildlife/Dental group needs new van/The early bird gets the egg/A Winslow volksmarch/The Bard teaches

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

The roller-coaster ride over ferry fares continued Wednesday as the proposed hike dipped to 6 percent. The Tariff Policy Committee and Washington State Ferries recommended boosting fares by more than 7 percent last week, higher than the 5 percent hike first proposed. The mid-range, 6 percent increase proposal came after a public hearing Wednesday in which riders voiced concerns over higher fares.

Charges reduced in molestation case

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

A Bainbridge Island man accused of child rape will plead guilty to a lesser charge, in a deal reached Thursday in Kitsap County Superior Court. David Alan Nusbaum, 40, was slated to stand trial this week on charges of first-degree child rape, for offenses against the daughter of his then-girlfriend over a six-year period beginning when the girl was age 6.

News Roundup -- Rockefeller for boating safety/City to offer memorials/Social Security on the table/Talk with your reps today/Locals rally for peace today

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

State Sen. Phil Rockefeller helped navigate a boater safety education bill through the state Senate Wednesday. “We have faster boats and more crowded waterways,” the Bainbridge Democrat said. “People need to learn the rules of the water.”

Summer drought begins now, city cautions

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Officials say dry conditions bring the threat of brush fires months earlier. Bainbridge firefighters dusted off the old brush-fire truck a few months early this year, working out a few kinks before what is expected to be a particularly hot, dry season kicks in. “This is looking like a huge issue with concerns numerous in scope,” Fire Chief Jim Walkowski said, as he watched firefighters blast fir trees with water. “We’ve already had a brush fire and that’s very significant. If things continue the way they are, we predict the fire season will begin in mid-April. That’s two or three months earlier than usual.”

Fare hike may be steeper still

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Commuters prevail on discount books, but the general increase may be 7.5 percent. The good news: frequent ferry riders can still use 10 discounted tickets within 90 days. The bad news: fares may increase even more than first proposed. Responding to thousands of comments, the Tariff Policy Committee and Washington State Ferries revised the 2005-2007 Tariff Policy proposal Wednesday, cutting one of its most controversial propositions, but boosting fares by 7.5 percent, higher than the 5 percent hike first proposed.

News Roundup -- Really light rail plans touted/Gormleys are granted a stay/Culture Fair this week

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

With a simple shove, Councilman Bill Knobloch was able to move a two-ton prototype train suspended in the air by magnets. Now he hopes an event today will give Bainbridge a push, building momentum for trains to the island. “It’s beyond amazing,” Knobloch said of his visit to the Magna Force lab in Port Angeles, to visit the train. “It’s a brand new technology that uses basic physics. It rides on air but doesn’t require electricity to do so.”

She’s outlived her insurance

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Now islander Ginene Swanson can only count on the help of community. Ginene Swanson has defied the odds, surviving three years with a metastic kidney cancer that was supposed to kill her in four months. Now she has a new problem: Her insurance coverage is about to end. And the Medicare plan that will kick in won’t pay for the treatments that have kept her alive. “Let me tell you: you do not want to get an ongoing, terminal disease in America,” said Swan­son’s hus­band and advocate, John Strachan, shaking his head.

Ferries to see return of food, spirits

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Vendor, union come to terms, with service to resume in May. David Groves took the news that onboard food service is likely to return in May as an overdue surprise, and the end of his criminal career. “I’m excited that I’ll end my stint as a lawbreaker,” the Bainbridge Ferry Advisory Committee member said. “I won’t have to brown-bag my beer on Friday after work like a wino. It’s great news.”

School tech levy set for May 17

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

The four-year, $8.9 million levy would pay for computers, training. It’s official: An $8.9 million technology levy for Bainbridge public schools will be on the May 17 ballot. If approved, the technology levy will replace aging computer systems and technology district-wide, providing use of one laptop computer, on average, for every four children in the district.

News Roundup -- Park parties clean up ivy/Kids museum seeks parents/Art Soup starved out/Downtown forum slated

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Barely an hour after the City Council accepted the Waterfront Park Master Plan update Wednesday, project lead Tami Allen and Eagle Harbor resident Dave Ullin had put a call out for volunteers to help with park improvements. With loppers, shears and even old sailing blocks, they showed up to clear ivy, holly and other invasive brambles blocking the waterfront view.

Historic home ‘rescued’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

The Eagle Place residence is an early applicant for listing on historic register. Even with the century-old house’s sagging frame, peeling paint and 8-foot tidal wave of blackberry brambles, Kristin Von Kreisler knew she’d been struck with love at first sight. “It looked like it could use a good hug,” the four-year island resident said. “I only saw it from the outside. Even before I went inside, I had decided I wanted it. It’s like a living thing.”

Winslow Hardware is closing its doors

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:38PM

Mary Hall and Ken Schuricht will continue to run Winslow Paint. Citing high costs, declining sales, unfavorable prospects and advancing years, owners Ken Schuricht and Mary Hall are closing Winslow Hardware and Mercantile, they said Friday. “You just reach a point where you don’t know if the ends justify the means to keeping the store going just to keep it going,” Schuricht said.

Lawsuit loss will cost city

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:37PM

One plaintiff sets the penalty at $100k. The failed defense of an island-wide moratorium on dock and bulkhead construction could cost the city around $100,000 in legal fees. The state Court of Appeals on Dec. 21 upheld a 2003 lower court decision striking down the moratorium, and directs the city to cover “reasonable attorney fees and costs” incurred by the citizens who brought suit on the city.

Giving to get: the new face of fundraising

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:37PM

Community groups, businesses are teaming up to raise money for local causes, projects. When the rain stopped, sales increased for junior rowers selling bags of coffee at the crosswalk outside Blackbird Bakery on a Sunday morning. Ariana Alexander paused at the tent with Grounds for Change’s “fair trade” product, for which the Bainbridge Island Rowing Club earned 40 cents on the dollar for each bag sold. “I’m looking for gifts that benefit others – not just things out of stores,” Alexander said, when asked why she chose to buy a couple of bags. “That (coffee) fit my standards for gift-buying this year.”

Harbor dwellers may see break in fees

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:37PM

The plan will go before the council early this year. Eagle Harbor liveaboards should receive city subsidies to defray new mooring and anchoring fees, Harbor Commission members said this week. Approving a series of amendments to the draft Eagle Harbor Mooring and Anchoring Plan, commissioners on Thursday also recommended that the city allow liveaboards to trade services for reduced moorage fees.

Robotic cameras eyed for council

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 5:37PM

Live camera operators may be phased out by the end of the year. The Bainbridge City Council will soon be under the watchful eye of robots. Stripping the council chambers of the five-foot tall cameras, cables and editing console that crowds city meetings, Bainbridge Island Broadcasting plans to install wall-mounted robotic cameras by the end of this year. “We’re really excited,” said BIB Executive Director Scott Schmidt. “We think the city will embrace the new technology, because it will provide better coverage and communication with the community.”

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