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Archive Results — 18776 thru 18800 of about 22175 items

City taps McKnight as code compliance officer

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

Planning officials credit her with a deep knowledge of city codes, regulations. As the city’s new code enforcement officer, Meghan McKnight must fill shoes deeply scuffed by her predecessor. But don’t expect McKnight, an island native who has worked for six years in the city’s planning and finance departments, to tread anywhere but the straight and narrow, say city officials and staff.

News Roundup - Inslee secures ferry funding/Boating season is under way/Yeomalt cabin plan advances/Memorial gets national nod/Youth summit in Suquamish

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

The House of Representatives approved an amendment this week that would include ferries in a federal homeland security grant program. The amendment, sponsored by Reps. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.) and Vito Fossella (R-N.Y.), was attached to the Security and Accountability for Every Port Act. “Without this change, Washington State Ferries wouldn’t be eligible for federal grants like one they received last year for $6.5 million to monitor and secure facilities,” said Inslee, who is a regular rider on the Bainbridge-Seattle ferry route. “Knowing that ferries in Puget Sound could be a terrorist target, it would be irresponsible to exclude them from the program.”

Fine works a mere Bagatelle

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

The Madrone Lane shop offers French antiques and ambience. At Bagatelle, the language of love is seen, not heard. It comes via fine craftsmanship, elegant lines, intricate designs and a history that dates to the kings of France. Shop owners Cat and Alain Bude offer this signature style on Madrone Lane, in an intimate showplace for French antiques.

Century-old elm finds new life as a table

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

The wood was salvaged after the tree was felled on the BHS campus. As an artist, Cecil Ross uses the tools of his trade to give life to otherwise inanimate chunks of wood. It makes sense, then, that Ross was called upon to resuscitate by way of art an elm tree cut down on the Bainbridge High School campus three years ago. “A friend of mine happened to be walking by when they cut it down,” Ross said of the elm, estimated to be 100 years old when it came down.

Cancer relay coming to island

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

The Relay for Life will be held July 29-30 at the high school. Cancer never rests, and for one night this summer, neither will Bainbridge Island. The American Cancer Society will host the island’s first-ever Relay for Life event July 29-30 at Bainbridge High School’s Memorial Stadium. It’s a quick start-up for a fund-raising event popular in communities nationwide, but only proposed for Bainbridge in March.

Pritchard beach to see capping, longer closure

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

Work may keep the public away for six months, starting this fall. The majority of Pritchard Park’s beach was reopened Thursday, but a 150-foot stretch of contaminated tideland will likely remain closed until next spring. “We need to analyze the data we collected, but it’s most likely we’ll put a cap on the area (with) construction done by April of next year,” said U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project manager Joe Wallace. The EPA closed much of the park’s beach in mid-April after a resident noticed the smell and sheen of the wood preservative creosote.

Bainbridge girl found dead in home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

A 17-year-old Bainbridge Island girl was found dead of unknown causes at her Tolo Road home Tuesday morning. The girl was identified by police as Joanna Black. She was discovered by family members at about 8 a.m. and could not be revived, apparently having died some hours earlier, police said.

A kindred spirit for creative souls

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:27PM

Nicole Ringgold is working to revive the island’s Arts Walk. Art is the constant in Nicole Ringgold’s life. Within its embrace, she has thrived, emotionally and creatively. It has helped her through rough patches and brings her the most joy, apart from her family. Using art, she has reached out to others as a means of service and connection.

News Roundup - Welcome to Tree City USA/Glitches delay ‘smart cards’/Shelter names ‘wild’ director

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Bainbridge Island earned “Tree City USA” designation last week in recognition of the city’s efforts to preserve trees within urban environments. Ben Thompson of the state Department of Natural Resources presented the award to the City Council and highlighted the city’s new Heritage Tree program, which designates trees of historical or biological significance.

Ideas far and wide for affordability

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Wini Jones wants to partner with the city for subsidized units. Wini Jones’s eyes are aflutter as she surveys a stand of trees at the corner of New Brooklyn and Sportsman Club roads. She’s not sure how much the 8-acre parcel she purchased in 1979 with a $2,000 down payment is worth now; she only knows it’s a healthy sum. What’s more important to Jones are plans to finally use it in a locally unprecedented way, as future rental housing for city employees. If things work out, Jones would retain the land, but the housing would be built and owned by a nonprofit organization and leased to the city to provide residences for those with moderate incomes on an island awash with inflated prices.

A show of (little) hands for Carmine

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

The Bainbridge Library welcomes a new young people’s librarian. Carmine Rau really knows how to string people along. When she tires of doing that, she becomes quite a cut-up, much to the delight of her young audiences. As the island’s new youth services librarian, Rau has an arsenal of creative tricks at the ready – including string figures, hand puppets, a flannel board for felt animal figures she makes and a French accent – all designed to make book-lovers out of her visitors, from the babies to the sixth-graders.

Creosote concerns close Pritchard Park beach

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Much of the new park’s shoreline closed for start of spring. Kayakers, beachcombers and dog walkers take heed: the beach at Pritchard Park will be closed until June, as recently discovered contamination is investigated. The U.S. Environmental Pro­tection Agency has cordoned off most of the park’s beach to conduct tests after creosote-related industrial toxins were reported late last summer by an island resident.

What goes up...keeps going up

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Rep. Inslee seeks relief as gas prices shrink family budgets. Keith Hauschulz watched the gas pump numbers tick by like an out-of-luck gambler, waiting for what he knows is always a losing combination. “I’ve been looking at these kinds of prices for a long time,” the island resident said. “I don’t think it’s going to change.” Hauschulz popped the trigger, stopping the Chevron service station’s one-armed bandit before his 1982 Dodge pickup was fully quenched. “There it is: 57 bucks and I only filled it three-quarters full,” he said, after holstering the pump.

News Roundup - Council OK’s harbor funds/Bridge delays this weekend/Vandeleur off to Poulsbo/Church hosts BMA players

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

With the state providing much of the financial muscle, the city approved a much larger budget for hauling abandoned boats from the island’s waters. “This will get the ball rolling,” said Harbor Commission Chair Bob Selzler of the City Council’s decision Wednesday to increase the derelict vessel program’s operating budget by almost 17 times its current level. “We’ll do what we can now to scuttle the worst offenders.”

Starting your own foundation?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Consultant Jule Meyer can turn you into a philanthropist. The tiny island of Kosrae punctures the surface of the Pacific, a dot in the ocean and on the timeline of Jule Meyer. It was there, more than 20 years ago as a member of the Peace Corps, that Meyer discovered a passion for philanthropy amid the confusion of role-reversal; of 6,000 residents, she was one of the only white women on the island. “I found out quickly what it was like to be ‘the other,’” Meyer said, adding that many people there referred to her as “whitey.” “Most of them didn’t even think about it (the nickname) being derogatory. They just saw me as different.”

Winslow parking regs may be changed

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

The Planning Commission mulls lower requirements for new buildings. Most agree that paradise is rarely a parking lot, but neither is a half-mile scamper through the rain after you’ve failed to find a closer spot. Thus, the debate continues over the future of parking in Winslow, as amendments to the current parking ordinance filter through the revision process. Street parking, shared parking and reducing the number of required spaces for businesses downtown were among the topics discussed by the public and the Planning Commission Thursday night.

Have we passed the spring frost? You sure?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:26PM

Your spring planting could hinge on Peter Emau’s data. Every morning, while most people’s sleepy eyes are scanning the newspaper, Peter Emau’s are fixed on his thermometer. For the past four years, Emau has been compiling weather statistics at his Bainbridge Island home in an effort to improve his garden’s potential. For him, gardening is more than just a hobby; it’s a link to the earth and his childhood in Uganda, which is why he takes great pride in the health of his crops.

Still the man

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

Retired Mariner, perennial fan favorite Dan Wilson coming to Bainbridge Island. If it wasn’t for Little League, baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr., actor Kevin Costner, humorist Dave Barry, musician Bruce Springsteen and President George W. Bush might not be where they’re at right now. Dan Wilson is another. “I look fondly back at those days,” the recently retired Seattle Mariners catcher said, of his time spent in the youth baseball league that he credits for making him who he is today.

For sale? Probably not

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

The city is poised to hand off the tiny T’Chookwap parcel to the park district. The tug-of-war over a little park on Port Madison was given a solid yank in the direction of public access this week. The City Council on Wednesday directed staff to draft a resolution for the transfer of T’Chookwap Park to the Bainbridge Island Metropolitan Park and Recreation District. The council expects to vote on the transfer at its May 10 meeting. “Back in the day, the intent was to provide access to the waterfront with this park – that’s a fact,” said Councilman Bill Knobloch, citing debates on the half-acre park on Spargur Loop Road when the city purchased it in 1992.

News Roundup - Errant crane strikes bridge/Time to blaze a few trails/Report out on cultural center/Bergeson to visit island/Boating safety class offered

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

A commercial truck carrying a construction crane clobbered the Agate Passage Bridge just after noon Tuesday, stalling highway traffic for close to an hour, police said. Witnesses reported that the truck was northbound on the highway with the crane boom protruding upward such that it hit a stoplight at the Day Road intersection. The truck continued on and struck the bridge, becoming lodged in the superstructure, according to police reports.

A celebration of dance at BHS

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

The spring production of ‘Once On This Island’ is alive with music and motion. With hot music, Bainbridge High School thespians will spin a spellbinding tale-within-a-tale, transforming LGI Theatre into a tropical paradise for its three-weekend spring production. Beneath the lush French Antilles setting, however, lies an ugliness in the form of class distinction that only love can overcome. But, alas, as in “Romeo and Juliet,” not in the mortal world. “Once On This Island,” which opens Thursday night, intertwines elements from that great tragedy with mythology and the longing in “The Little Mermaid.”

A world awaits behind the gate

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

Antiques abound on Ericksen Avenue. The Iron Gate offers the charm and allure of a grown-up dollhouse. The newly opened antiques shop features a welcoming facade, numerous spacious rooms and beautiful furniture that its owners – Ruth Devine and Erin Wyatt love buying and showing off. “Your home should be a place for your soul,” Wyatt said. “I would like people to feel comfortable here. Not a lot of pressure. I want to give them a place to feel good and get ideas.”

Housing forum this Saturday

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

Advocates for affordability will confront the high cost of living here. Islands, by geography, are exclusive, but continually escalating home prices have created a rift on Bainbridge that’s as effective as any natural boundary. The island’s year-to-date median home price – the point at which half of homes cost more and half less – hit $551,000 in March, a number that’s out of reach of many home buyers. With the population expected to grow by 7,000 people over the next 20 years, that number is likely to increase.

And the Amy Award goes to...

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

...Vincent Palazzolo-Packard, dancer and actor. Vincent Palazzolo-Packard got a phone call that left him the same way his performances leave audiences: speechless. That’s how Palazzolo-Packard learned he is the recipient of the sixth annual Amy Award for emerging Bainbridge artists. An awards ceremony in his honor will be held May 1 at the home of Dave and Caren Anderson, who funded the endowment in honor of their late daughter.

Colman upgrade in works

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:25PM

Extensive changes to the Seattle terminal would dovetail with Winslow plans. Ten years, $385 million and a sheet of saltwater are all that separate Bainbridge Islanders from their future commute. As plans continue to take shape for $160 million worth of improvements at the Bain­bridge terminal, Wash­ington State Ferries announced plans last week for $225 million in upgrades at Seattle’s Colman Dock. Kevin Dwyer, who is part of the 12-member community advisory group for the Bainbridge Island terminal, said both terminals deserve facelifts.

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