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Archive Results — 18751 thru 18775 of about 22350 items

Luxury living for seniors comes to town

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"A new island development envisions the comforts of home, the amenities of a hotel and the security of instant medical services in one package.That's the concept behind the Meridian on Bainbridge Island, a mixed-use development planned for the north side of Knechtel Way , between the Helpline House grounds to the west and the dentist office to the east, along Ericksen Avenue.The Meridian will have 15,000-square feet of medical office space - almost twice the size of the Virginia Mason Winslow Clinic - on the ground floor, and 18 condominiums on the second and third floors. The residences will be age-restricted, requiring at least one occupant to be 55 or older. Residents will have concierge service, a town car and on-site catering available.The prices reflect the level of amenities. "

"On the air, across the nationTom Kelly takes his popular radio real estate show to the rest of the U.S."

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"Tom Kelly is on his way to becoming a household name on houses.Kelly, a Bainbridge Island resident, recently closed an agreement to nationally syndicate his KIRO-AM radio program on real estate issues - meaning that The Real Estate Show With Tom Kelly will be airing in some 79 major U.S. markets as of Nov. 26.It's another move toward establishing Kelly, who already syndicates a weekly newspaper column and reaches untold masses through his partnership in an Bainbridge-based Internet venture - not to mention several television guest appearances and public speaking engagements - as a pre-eminent media authority on real estate.I'm a lucky guy, said Kelly, an island resident since 1989. I get to do what I love, I get to help people, and I get to live here and work here. "

Telecom conference slatedLeaders hope to get Bainbridge back in the race for telecommunications

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"When the first railroad lines were laid more than 100 years ago, any town left off the line died. When the first highways were built this century, any town left off the highway died. To Kevin Dwyer of the Kitsap Economic Development Council, any community without good telecommunications lines will face the same fate as the unfortunate towns left off the railroad lines and highways.If they (cities) weren't on the lines, they were far removed from commerce, said Dwyer, of Bainbridge Island. If you're not connected, you're not going anywhere.The theory is particularly relevant to Dwyer, who sees Kitsap County stuck between the high-tech ambition it has for growth and the rural surroundings it wants to do it in. "

"Compact homes, compact living"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"Houses should be designed from the inside out, island architect Bernie Baker says. But with most of them, it's absolutely backward.The impetus is to design for curb appeal, that is, the way the house looks from the street, Baker said. The real issue is, how it flows from the inside out.And in saying design should start with what is inside, he doesn't just mean the inside of the house. He's talking about what's inside the people who will live there.The house has to respond to the lives of its owners, Baker said.Baker's thinking parallels that of Minnesota architect Sarah Susanka, whose recent book The Not So Big House became an influential best-seller. Susanka's follow-up volume, called Creating The Not So Big House, features a Baker-designed remodel on Mercer Island.They liked the spot, but not the house, Baker said of his clients. The design made it possible to have their house transformed into a dream. "

The 'click-and-mortar' business

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"Everybody talks figuratively about a product that sells itself.With the know-how of a Bainbridge Island firm, some companies like AT&T have converted that phrase from a figure of speech to a literal reality.We are what I call a 'click-and-mortar' business, said John Eisenhauer, president of Mercury On Line Solutions. I saw technology and traditional retailing coming together, and wanted to be the guy who knitted them.Mercury designs, installs and maintains interactive kiosks - computer screens that respond to questions and requests from users. Because the content is Internet-based, messages can be updated instantly from a central location. "

Inspiration on the green

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"Of all the seductive illusions of golf, perhaps none is more deeply ingrained than the notion that the latest equipment can overcome all the manifest flaws of one's swing.But Patrick Broom and his island-based Optic Golf are attacking one aspect of the game where physical limitations really aren't confining - the putting game. We've designed a putter that's easy to line up visually, Broom said. And it's easier to make a pendulum stroke through the ball.The first thing you notice about the Optic Z putter line is the Z shape of the neck head. The neck thrusts forward from the club's shaft, then back at a 90-degree angle to join the putter head.The weight on the leading edge (the part that thrusts forward) raises the center of gravity of the putter, Broom said. That makes it easier to create top spin, which holds the ball on line longer.The club is also balanced in such a way that it's less inclined to rotate during the putting stroke, Broom said. "

"For cafe owners, it's in the sauce"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:46PM

"There's room to improve on success. But you have to do it very carefully, says the new owner of one of Bainbridge's best-known restaurants.Richard Ramsey and his wife Barbara took over the Winslow Way Cafe Sept. 1. And while they have their own vision for the future, they want to hang onto the ingredients that have made the restaurant a success.This has been the best - and certainly the busiest - restaurant on Bainbridge, Richard Ramsey said. The challenge is to keep the same cozy, casual atmosphere, but elevate the cuisine another notch, to compete with the best restaurants in Seattle.The Ramseys bought the restaurant in Lundgren Station from Tom Lathrop and Carl Sussman over the summer, and officially took over this month.The Ramseys brought in a new chef, Ken Lyons, who has extensive experience in California with French nouvelle cuisine. They lured former islander Jim Patterson back from Boulder, Colo., to serve as wine steward. Lonnie Wigham, Barbara's sister, will be the manager. "

Blackbird back from the blast

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"The baker and the bakery are both getting back on their feet.When an oven exploded at the downtown Blackbird Bakery on June 1, co-owner Heidi Umphenour had her foot broken on several places. But when the bakery re-opens at 6 a.m. Friday morning, she'll be on her feet and ready to go, encumbered only by a light walking cast.We're recovering at about the same pace, she said about herself and her business.The heavy-duty oven blew up three and a half months ago, at dawn. The explosion lifted the roof off the building on the corner of Winslow Way and Madrone Lane, and blew through a wall connecting the bakery to the business on the east. The heavy oven lifted into the air and jumped forward, onto Umphenour's foot.It was like a tin can with a firecracker under it, bakery partner Jeff Shepard said. But the oven was so massive it contained the explosion. It saved lives. "

Slowing down to 'island time'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Life enabled Aileen Agricola to slow down from an all-consuming work pace.Now, the new owner of Bainbridge Coffee and Ice Cream at the Pavilion is trying to persuade others to do the same thing, even momentarily.I'm trying to put in things that remind us we can stop and take a moment, said Agricola, who bought the coffee stand at the end of July.A coffee bar on Bainbridge Island represents the last stop of a long journey for Agricola. "

A new niche for island knitting circles

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"The dictionary defines the word knitting literally as the act of fashioning yarn into a garment, and metaphorically as the joining together of previously unrelated elements.According to knitting devotee Kit Hutchin, one leads to the other.Knitting is something that creates instant community among people who have that in common, Hutchin said. And it seems that people feel comfortable approaching someone who is knitting and striking up a conversation.Believing that there are enough actual and potential knitters on Bainbridge Island to support a business, Hutchin this week will open Churchmouse Yarn and Teas on Madrone Lane. "

That finishing fashion touch

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"It's the shoes that are fitting southern transplant Andrea Ragin into Bainbridge. And judging from the early reaction to Magnolia's on Madison, Ragin's new shoe store, the match is a good one.I was looking for a deficit in retail opportunities, what was not being provided on the island, she said.I polled different merchants, and shoes were it.The store opened Aug. 18 in Lundgren Station on the corner of Winslow Way and Madison Avenue. "

Charting an historical course

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"For Christopher Charles, the past is his future.Long a collector and occasional seller of antiquarian print material, Charles is in the process of opening Fleet Street Gallery on Winslow Way. The business will sit between Roberts Jewelers and the Roby King Gallery, in the front portion of the space formerly occupied by Dwight's Floral.This is something I've wanted to do for 30 years, said Charles. I've got six kids - one at Bainbridge High School and the rest in college. So now is the time. "

Booth of no return

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Since 1993, when the Lundgren Station booth was improved as a business venue, an array of entrepreneurs have hung out shingles and set up shop in its 15 or so square feet of work space. Most foundered, although several went on to thrive in new locations. Here's the scorecard: "

Vietnamese cuisine outgrows the market

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"It sits on downtown Winslow's busiest intersection, looking a little like a bus stop. And for the businesses that have occupied it, the tiny booth on the northeast corner of Winslow Way and Madison Avenue has indeed been a temporary shelter.Most of them have gone away. Some have moved on and thrived elsewhere. The present occupant, Emmy's VegeHouse, definitely intends to be among the survivors.We need to find something a little bit bigger with a couple of indoor tables, said Hong Nguyen, who operates the Vietnamese vegetarian restaurant with her mother, Emmy Tran.They're not worried about finding customers. They've been offering their food at the Bainbrige Island Farmers' Market for a decade.Some seven years ago, Emmy made the decision to become a vegetarian. She changed her restaurant menu accordingly, and business jumped.I became vegetarian and started feeling better, Tran said. And animals have their own rights. Why do we eat them?Nguyen said that islanders are very conscious of eating healthy food, and took to the vegetarian menu immediately. In fact, some found their Saturday morning breakfast so addicting that they couldn't face a winter without their Vietnamese tofu fix. "

Development at home with open space

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"If you want a look at the Bainbridge of tomorrow, check out North Town Woods, a new development north of New Brooklyn Avenue and east of Sportsman Club Road.Lots are small - 6,000 to 7,000 square feet. Of necessity, homes are close together.This is the outgrowth of changed platting requirements that favor clustered development, developer Jim Laughlin said. We have groups of neighborhoods with no cul de sacs. The neighborhoods are separated by open space, and every house backs up to open space. "

Catering to island coneheads

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Elizabeth Kelsey is the first to admit that she's a little nuts about fruit.This is my obsession, my baby, she says about the fruit-based ice cream she sells from her tiny store-front on Bjune Drive below Eagle Harbor Books, next to Lindsley's and Bainbridge Auto Parts.Kelsey's All-Natural Ice Cream, as the store is called, is a misnomer. There's no cream or any other dairy product involved. Only organically grown fruit."

Zoltan the sultan of business

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Once he is finished explaining how his name is pronounced, Zoltan Szigethy will explain his hopes for the Kitsap Regional Economic Development Council.I hope I can expand the diversity of employment, said Bainbridge Island resident Szigethy, who was appointed the EDC's new executive director last week.The Kitsap Regional EDC is a non-profit organization that looks to bring bigger and better business into Kitsap County. Bainbridge Island resident Kevin Dwyer, the EDC's director of business recruiting and marketing, said the EDC's mission boils down to bringing new dollars into the market.We want to recruit and maintain primary businesses, Dwyer said. The companies don't have to be headquartered in Kitsap County, but we want people working for them here.EDC president Karl Jonietz said Szigethy has the right balance of business sense and community devotion that he and the other board members looked for in their search, which brought candidates from all over the nation."

Going toe to toe with Big Tobacco

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Once upon a time, a lawyer had to choose between the excitement, challenge and financial rewards of a big-city practice and the lifestyle benefits of a smaller town.But today, it's possible to have both, according to Jon Ferguson, managing partner of the what is called the Seattle branch of an international law firm. The office isn't in a Seattle high-rise, but on Bainbridge Island's waterfront.Our principal asset is our database, Ferguson said. Electronic connectivity allows us to send documents back and forth on the Internet, so it doesn't matter where we are.Ferguson and Jeffrey Bean, along with paralegal Leslie Rothbaum, are the Northwest outpost of Chandler, Franklin & O'Bryan, a Virginia-based firm with affiliated offices in Washington D.C., Maryland, Los Angeles and in 11 countries in South and Central America. The firm represents claimants in injury cases, both personal and commercial."

Flying off the shelves like magic

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Harry Potter gladdens the hearts of more than children and their parents. For booksellers, the young wizard is the biggest thing that's happened since Herr Gutenberg came up with the idea of movable type.There's never been anything like this, said Mary Gleysteen, events coordinator at Eagle Harbor Books in Winslow. The fourth volume of the Harry Potter series was the largest first run in the history of printing - five million copies. And I understand they're on the second printing already.Introduced in 1997, the fantasy series - chronicling the exploits of a young magician going through the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry - has created an international phenomenon, attracting both young readers and adults and numerous critical plaudits."

San Juan building in shipping-shape

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Bainbridge's newest and arguably most spectacular office building is the product of sheer serendipity - being taken to the cleaners in the right way at the right time.I took some clothes to the cleaners, said John Ellis, building principal, and the woman at the counter said I had to pick them up by next week. I asked why, and she said the building was for sale. When I told my brother Ed that, he said, 'buy it.'So the Ellis brothers bought the old PFR drycleaners on the northeast corner of Winslow Way and Ferncliff Avenue in 1995."

Business has been 'skookum'

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"When Ann and Bruce Candioto built Skookum Company clothing store, they used native materials of an intangible kind - the diverse impressions and ideas that Ann picked up from the community.This has been a wonderfully nurturing community for me personally, Ann Candioto said. I have had inspirations from a variety of people I've known, and I've tried to incorporate those into a successful business.Now, though, it's time for the creator and the creation to part company. The Candiotos are selling the business to semi-retire - rest and travel.This was always the plan - to build a successful business, then sell in five years she said."

"Kiln fires fusion of art, commerce"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:45PM

"Bainbridge ceramic artist Brian Mackin doesn't see tension between art and commerce. In fact, he says, you can't have one without the other.Once the object goes out your door, it's a business, he says. You have to reconcile falling in love with art and the landlord who wants his rent.Mackin is one of the relatively small percentage of artists whose artwork supports a family and a mortgage. His secret formula is the same as for any business - persistence and hard work.As you go along, each year, people drop out, and you have less competition with experience, he said. Stick with it long enough, and you will break free.But there is also hard work. To get ready for his current show at Bainbridge Arts and Crafts, Mackin has been spending 18 hours a day in his custom-built studio next to his house on Roberts Road."

"Winslow sees comings, goings"

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:44PM

"June appears to be the season for changes. Graduation time. Wedding time. Fickle weather, at least in the Northwest.And this year, June is a time of change in the downtown Winslow streetscape.In what the owner vows is only a temporary move, the Blue Water Diner on Madison Avenue is closed for re-tooling, as is the oil-change operation of the neighboring Packard's Quality Service. The businesses opened in 1997."

A new tune for local musicians

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:44PM

">The writer confesses his shameless envy of the interviewee.Whenever business is slow, he notes, Carson Farley can just walk across the room, pick up a guitar and noodle away the afternoon.Or a keyboard, in my case, said Farley, plunking out a tune on a flashy Yamaha at the new Island Music store, upstairs at Winslow Mall."

They were independent to the last

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 6:44PM

"Lou Goller and Pauline Deschamps were icons of island business.Bainbridge Island prides itself on being distinctive and independent - not a part of anything or anyplace else. Louis Goller and Pauline Deschamps, two business people honored posthumously by the Bainbridge Island Chamber of Commerce at its annual awards luncheon last week, succeeded by adopting that attitude for their businesses.Deschamps, who died Feb. 5 of this year, and Goller, who died Feb. 17, bucked the trend toward consolidation and homogenization, and thrived by going their own way, friends, family members and associates said."

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