Story Archives

Archive Results — 18126 thru 18150 of about 23600 items

Park and ride repaired: thanks a lot

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

We’d be remiss in our duties as occasional chider of local officialdom if we didn’t hand out roses now and again as well. Ergo, in an otherwise sluggish news week, we should offer a follow-up report on the Phelps Road park and ride lot, and what has transpired there since our commentary of a few weeks back.

One petition we hope that islanders sign

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

We’ve all been accosted by paid signature-gatherers aboard the ferry or on the street corner: “Excuse me (ma’am/sir), would you like to sign a petition that would force the government to (do something that sounds good on its face, but in reality is probably imprudent or inadvisable)?” Generally speaking, it’s good policy to just “no thanks” and walk away (even when, depending on the initiative and/or its sponsor, you’d really like to grab the clipboard and whack the person over the head with it). But this isn’t one of those times. In fact, we urge islanders to seek out and sign on with the (decidedly unpaid) canvassers from Partners for Parks, who you’ll see around Bainbridge Island over the next few weeks.

Where is next signal really needed?

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

Damage to the car was such that you couldn’t easily determine the make or model. That was the unfortunate result of its being struck broadside by another vehicle coming down the highway, the car’s journey through the air and over a guardrail 30 feet away, and its tumble to the bottom of a ravine next to Hidden Cove Road. Debris littered the roadway amid skid marks and gouged pavement; traffic was rerouted for hours while police took measurements to sort out physics and motives and misjudgments; the driver was in intensive care at Harborview.

Leaving a smaller mark

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

Next time you worry about Bainbridge Island getting too crowded, you might broaden your perspective a bit to think about the Earth. To mark the annual Earth Day observances, we would direct readers to an online quiz sponsored by the organization Leadership for Environment and Development International. Take a few minutes and consider how big an “ecological footprint” you might really be leaving on this little planet we call home. Those small, individual choices start to add up: www.lead.org/leadnet/footprint/intro.htm.

Ferry fortunes are getting a positive spin

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

If you want some symbol of progress at Colman Dock, look no further than the pending eviction of the “people mover” walkway that never moves any people. The ramp up from Alaskan Way – which must have seemed pretty innovative in its day, but for years has sat idle and forlorn like a refugee from some dystopian Futureland – will be torn out this fall as Seattle’s aging ferry terminal gets a comprehensive and long-needed makeover. Also in the works, as reported in this issue, is a food court anchored by one of our own home-grown businesses, Commuter Comforts.

How the Lost Valley was found

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

“Where are we?” someone on the trail ahead of us asked.“I don’t know,” came the answer – from, ominously, one of our guides. Well, it is called the Lost Valley – even the press was asked to bring along a machete should the going get too rough. But we can report that of the intrepid band of 15 who this past Saturday braved the dense forestland north of Bucklin Hill, west of the Head of the Bay, all emerged unscathed (although city Administrator Lee Walton had to be rescued from a patch of Northwest quicksand, a.k.a. mud).

Downtown vision: the timeless need

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

A week ago in this space, we ruminated on our community planning process coming full circle via the Winslow Tomorrow project. And proving that where Bainbridge Island issues go, there really is nothing new under the sun, we’ve since then come across this commentary that appeared on the Review’s editorial page on May 10, 1956. Downtown street needs, local business concerns, public financing questions, Winslow’s relationship with the greater island, and the quest for a common, community-wide vision.

Of congresses and sticky dots

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

It felt like 1992 all over again – there was Darlene Kordonowy leading a discussion about island planning issues and talking about, of all things, “sticky dots.” You have to have been around a while to appreciate the reference. More than a decade ago, when the denizens of our newly created all-island city set out to draft a comprehensive land-use plan, the humble adhesive paper dot was the straw-poll medium of choice. At various town meetings – including one in which more than 300 people were asked where they preferred to see future growth, in Winslow or the outlying “villages” – folks enthusiastically filed past large posterboard displays and cast their votes dot by dot, which at the end of the exercise gave colorful illumination to the popular sentiment.

Bridge never gets too far

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

Nothing builds bridges like the chance to blow one up, even if it’s still a figment of the fevered Kitsap County imagination. So if you wandered off to the refrigerator at the wrong moment while watching Wednesday’s City Council meeting on BIB, you may have missed the brief reappearance of that great uniter in Bainbridge politics: opposition to any plan for another span from the Kitsap mainland. For the second time in four years, the council passed a formal resolution opposing a second bridge, citing the usual litany of objections: condemnation of property, relocation of families, environmental consequences...everything except Bainbridge exclusivity, which is probably implicit in the text anyway.

Pedal faster, Lorenz – we need you

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

Where’s Lorenz Eber when you need him? The answer is, “Down Under” – but not for much longer. The once and future engineer with the city public works department – who achieved minor fame hereabouts as the father of the Madison Avenue roundabout – is in New Zealand with his wife, Paula Holmes, and their two daughters, completing the final foreign leg of an around-the-world bicycle ride to raise funds for asthma research (www.bikeforbreath.org). At last report, having conquered Europe and Asia, the Eber-Holmes clan was crossing the vast expanses of Kiwi Country, bound for Wellington (although a 200-mile stretch was being traversed in a bus, after one daughter banged up her foot and couldn’t pedal for a week).

Rally around a new chief

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

How did the search for Bainbridge Island’s next police chief go? Here’s one measure: At the conclusion of formal interviews of the four finalists, by a panel that included several of our region’s police chiefs, an island attorney and former judge, and the local fire chief, several on that panel agree the mutual sentiment was: You couldn’t go wrong with any of them. That’s a fine position for the mayor to be in as she appoints a new chief, and one that should give administration, City Council and the Bainbridge public alike confidence and pride. At tonight’s council meeting, Mayor Darlene Kordonowy will announce her preference of Matt Haney as Bainbridge Island’s next chief of police. Whether the council will make the leap of faith – for that is what hiring always is, under even the most controlled circumstances – that, we shall see.

Few options for mobile home park

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

To get some idea of the economic realities facing the Islander Mobile Home Park, one need only look north across Madrona Way to where “luxury townhomes” are under construction. Under present zoning – the most dense on the island, as it happens – and under private redevelopment, that is the likely destiny of the six-plus acres on which the mobile home park’s 60 or so families now reside. It is one of the tradeoffs inherent in our island’s Comprehensive Plan: high-intensity development in the Winslow core, in hopes of forestalling demand for housing out in the Bainbridge hinterlands.

Dry runs on opening day

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:29PM

We went into this edition expecting to bring readers good news, or at least some news, about the resumption of ferry galley services. But, after vowing that new kitchen and ferry terminal concessionaires would be announced yesterday, Washington State Ferries veered off course and instead confessed that interviews are ongoing. Too bad, as the galley shutdown continues to inspire pique among some riders and union officials, while a deadline of sorts draws nigh.

Plumbing the depths of our ‘new ocean’

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Sometimes it is a good idea to look back at where we’ve been – even when what we can expect to see is a pillar of salt. The Aquarius mission, described elsewhere in these pages, is a reminder that a good deal of scientific discovery lies in the renewed examination of the familiar. In the case of the mission that islander Gary Lagerloef sends skyward in 2008, the salinity of our planet’s oceans – a critical contributor to Earth’s climate, well known but sparsely measured – will be mapped for the first time, in just eight days. That’s a treasure trove of information, and it’s made possible by one of NASA’s most overlooked extraterrestrial enterprises: unmanned, near-earth scientific study.

Tax ‘reform’ clouds local planning

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

relative merits of lid lifts versus new user fees and special levies, and which of those options might be, in the new parlance of public planning, “Eyman-proof.”

Public school needs are interrelated

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Levies, bonds, trusts, taxes. With no fewer than four requests for school funds announced over the last few weeks, islanders might be pardoned for considering zipping pockets that are – in some instances, at least – shallower than they were a few years back. Or could we blame our friends and neighbors if, besieged by the increasing costs of food, transportation, home repairs and other essential bills, they decided to pick one from column A, and leave alternatives B, C and D for another year?

Museum move was quite a show

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

There was something refreshingly small-town about Wednesday’s move of the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum building from Strawberry Hill Park into Winslow. It had something to do with the sheer novelty of seeing the historic red schoolhouse trundling along under tow, but it was also more than that – it was how that sight emptied businesses and public buildings all along its route. Library patrons, restaurateurs, school kids, shoppers, random passersby – everyone, it seemed, put their regular business aside for a little while to watch history crawl past.

Teachers and textbooks: a prime cut

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Folks of a certain age may remember a Seattle-area used-car dealer who didn’t have much use for public education. For several years in the 1970s, whenever a school levy was on the ballot, the businessman paid for television ads in opposition; against the visual image of a butcher’s knife carving through a piece of lardaceous pork, he urged citizens to “vote no” to “cut the fat” out of the school budget. The message worked; levies went down to defeat, programs were cut and a junior high school was closed.

‘Co-location’ the new key for cell towers

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Back in the 1960s, the hero of archetypal spy spoof “In Like Flint” wielded a hi-tech lighter with no few than 82 distinct functions – “83, if you wish to light a cigar.” One can only wonder what the film’s eponymous character, played to suave perfection by James Coburn, would make of the gadgetry embedded in today’s cellular phones – email and instant messaging, digital cameras and music players, streaming video and animation, Ms. Pac-Man games. What once was fantastic, the stuff of science fiction, is now de riguer even for teenagers.

Fire levy raises tough questions

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

When does “enough” become “too much”? That question informs the decision-making each time a property tax measure goes before voters. Earlier this month, islanders could not be rallied in sufficient number to approve an 8 percent per year hike in the park district’s tax receipts; park officials are considering new revenue streams and cutbacks as they plan a second levy attempt. And come May, those same voters will decide the Bainbridge Island Fire Department’s proposed levy “lid lift” – raising the base property taxes collected by the department – a tax hike of fully 20 percent per year, to fund operations and new equipment purchases through 2010.

Blue skies, black roof

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Thanks to a grant of clemency by the weather gods, we’ve been out Battle Point Park way a few times in the past week. Besides the abundant blue (!) sky, others of like mind and leg may have noticed some activity around the old transmitter building inside the park’s front gate.

Many steps toward grand endowment

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

The challenge: to build a “community portfolio.” Month by month, in steps that may pass without much notice if you’re not paying attention, that challenge is being met through the Bainbridge Island Community Endowment. We thought it might be time to connect a few of those steps into a coherent path.

For one day at least, issues matter

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Who’s the frontrunner this week? Who’s falling behind, and who do the insiders think has the best chance to rebound? And (what really seems to matter), who’s bringing in the most money? Those are the usual themes in the depthless, poll-driven “horse race” coverage of our national elections, no more so than in the selection of the Democratic Party challenger to President Bush.

Land Trust is worth its weight in green

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

It’s tough to quantify the absence of change. It’s a concept that comes into clear relief over time, and only then by contrast with whatever happens around it. The absence of change takes patience to observe, and a certain vision to foster. Credit the Bainbridge Island Land Trust for promoting the value that islanders seem to value above all others – year-in, year-out consistency in the natural landscape around us – so effectively and for so many years.

Bus investment starts at home

  • Jun 9, 2008 at 9:28PM

Why can’t more people ride the bus? That has been among the questions raised by the downtown planning process, specifically, parking garages to meet the needs of shoppers and service patrons. Given the huge expense of garages, one argument goes, mightn’t money be better spent “investing” in transit?

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