Photo courtesy of the Treehouse Café | Sarah Potenza will return to Lynwood’s central stage at the Treehouse Café at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 18 for a special one-night-only, 21-and-older show celebrating the release of her new album “Road to Rome.”

Photo courtesy of the Treehouse Café | Sarah Potenza will return to Lynwood’s central stage at the Treehouse Café at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 18 for a special one-night-only, 21-and-older show celebrating the release of her new album “Road to Rome.”

Blues queen Sarah Potenza returns to the Treehouse

“Potenza is to the blues what Adele is to pop.”

So says Rolling Stone Magazine of blues queen Sarah Potenza, who will return to Lynwood’s central stage at the Treehouse Café at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 18 for a special one-night-only, 21-and-older show celebrating the release of her new album, “Road to Rome.”

Tickets, $18 for reserved tables seating, are available now at www.treehousebainbridge.com.

“I work for me,” Sarah Potenza declares at the beginning of “Road to Rome,” kicking off her second solo album — a record of self-empowered R&B, swaggering soul, and contemporary blues — with her own declaration of independence.

Filled with messages of self worth, determination and drive, “Road to Rome” shines new light on a songwriter whose career already includes multiple albums as front-woman of Sarah and the Tall Boys, a game-changing appearance on The Voice, and an acclaimed solo debut titled “Monster,” which earned her the aforementioned Rolling Stone kudos.

Now that sound deepens and intensifies with “Road to Rome,” an album that shows the full scope of Potenza’s aims and ambitions.

And just who is Sarah Potenza? She’s a songwriter. A bold, brassy singer. A businesswoman. A proud, loud-mouthed Italian-American from Providence, Rhode Island, with roots in Nashville and an audience that stretches across the Atlantic.

Co-written by Potenza, produced by Jordan Brooke Hamlin (Indigo Girls, Lucy Wainwright Roche) and recorded with a female-heavy cast of collaborators, Potenza said “Road to Rome” isn’t just her story, but the story of all artists — particularly women, who remain the minority within the male-dominated music industry — who’ve learned to trust their instincts, refusing to let mainstream trends dilute their own artistic statements.

Released on International Women’s Day this year, “Road to Rome” is the sound of a songwriter taking the wheel and driving toward her own destination.

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