Arts and Entertainment

Bainbridge photographer shares secrets for capturing remarkable images

Island-based nature photographer Steven Fey made this photo in the Olympic National Forest near the Hamma Hamma River. Fey often lends his talents to support conservation efforts including the current Washington Wild initiatives.   - Steven Fey photo
Island-based nature photographer Steven Fey made this photo in the Olympic National Forest near the Hamma Hamma River. Fey often lends his talents to support conservation efforts including the current Washington Wild initiatives.
— image credit: Steven Fey photo

Ever wonder how some photographers come away with images that appear almost magical? Bainbridge Island photographer Steven Fey offers some tips to those looking to capture the perfect image.

Steven says:

As the sun begins to set earlier and earlier, and the kids return to school, there can be no doubt that summer is quickly coming to an end. That may be so, but it ain't over yet -and if you have one more weekend road trip, or a last-minute getaway beckoning on your upcoming calendar, you may very well be looking to make some improvements to your scenic photography and better capture the experience.

Follow these basic tips from Fey, a professional nature photographer, to take your travel photos to the next level.

1. Slow down!

Most amateur photographers make the initial mistake of just getting to excited, Fey said.

"Stop and stay in the particular scene for 20, 30, 40 minutes," he advised. "Kind of look around and, if the clouds are moving around, watch the light come in and out and sort of look at the light."

2. Get high, get low

Don't just stand there, Fey said. Move the camera to get better, more creative views.

"98 percent of people stand up and take their picture - which is a boring perspective," he said. "Buy a little tiny portable tripod and get the camera on it. Get down on your belly and get on your knees and get wherever you have to get to get a more interesting perspective."

3. If at first you don't succeed….

Don't rush off after you think you got the shot. Fey said that oftentimes some of his best work has been done after his initial shots.

"Shoot something and then, if you can afford the time to stay, hold your fire and stay," he advised. "Do it again if the light is going to change."

4. Do a test

One experiment Fey highly recommends to those looking to advance their understanding of light, is to photograph a scene later in the day in the exact same way from the exact same position every 15 minutes as it gets darker.

"Kind of observe the result, because they'll all be in sequence," he said. "You can see them in sequence. Observe the result and kind of make the connection between when you shot and which result is best."

Fey will present an exhibition of landscape images to promote awareness for Washington Wild's Wild Olympics proposal in September at The Steven Fey Gallery (278 Winslow Way, Suite 203).

There will be an artist's reception during First Friday Art Walk from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5.

 

 

 

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