Arts and Entertainment

Ritchie Observatory presents ‘Our Island Universe’

On Jan. 19, 2007, the Cassini spacecraft took this view of Saturn and its rings - the visible documentation of a technique called a
On Jan. 19, 2007, the Cassini spacecraft took this view of Saturn and its rings - the visible documentation of a technique called a 'pi transfer' completed with a Titan flyby. A pi transfer uses the gravity of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, to alter the orbit of the Cassini spacecraft so it can gain different perspectives on Saturn and achieve a wide variety of science objectives. During a pi transfer, Cassini flies by Titan at opposite sides of its orbit about Saturn (i.e., Titan's orbital position differs by pi radians between the two flybys) and uses Titan's gravity to change its orbital perspective on the ringed planet.
— image credit: Image courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The planetarium show “Our Island Universe” comes to Ritchie Observatory at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12.

Join Astronomer Steve Ruhl on a journey out of our solar system navigating the environment and structures in our galaxy, the Milky Way.

If the sky is clear, astronomers will be on hand with telescopes for public star-gazing.

The program is free to members of the Battle Point Astronomical Association; $2 donation suggested for nonmembers, $5 for families.

For more information, call 206-842-9152 or visit www.bpastro.org.

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