Arts and Entertainment

‘Little Shop of Horrors’ sprouts cast of fine actors

From left: Student actors Sara Reisdorf, Katey Hamlin, Isabelle Ranson, Emma Marshall, Izzy Magrini, Lesley Lemon, Yaylor Hebert and Kat Zommers perform in the Bainbridge High School musical Little Shop of Horrors. - John Goessman photo
From left: Student actors Sara Reisdorf, Katey Hamlin, Isabelle Ranson, Emma Marshall, Izzy Magrini, Lesley Lemon, Yaylor Hebert and Kat Zommers perform in the Bainbridge High School musical Little Shop of Horrors.
— image credit: John Goessman photo

With a song, and a burp, Bainbridge High School shows they’ve got acting chops.

The high school’s production of “Little Shop of Horrors” opened last weekend and impressed audiences with the youthful talent found on their own island.

But the fun is not over. The production has two more performances scheduled for this weekend at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 4 and Saturday, May 5.

“It is going to be a really good show this weekend,” said Dylan Lehotsky, who plays Orin the dentist in the production. “This is a big show that a lot of people love to see.”

The opening weekend went well, giving the students a chance to work out any kinks, though as it turns out, not much needed to be worked out to begin with.

“They all went well. From a technical point of view, they were almost flawless. From an actor’s point of view, we all did fantastic jobs,” Lehotsky said.

“Because we got this first weekend out of the way, everyone is a lot more comfortable,” he added. “Before we hadn’t seen an audience or had a preview night to get ready. We were just tossed into the ring.”

Lehotsky, 16, wears many hats for the musical. He is the lighting designer, besides playing Orin the dentist. From design to acting, his fingerprints are all over the production.

“It is a very hard show to design,” Lehotsky said. “To design and get the street to look different than the shop was a challenge.”

“The script gives a very good description of what the set is, but at the same time, we don’t want to do what Broadway did. We want to make it our own,” he added.

The show is impressive. For a small stage in the high school’s LGI building, the musical manages to pack a punch.

Perhaps most impressive are the acting abilities of the students themselves. After one viewing it is clear that Bainbridge Island has talent.

And what about the most famous star of the musical? How does a high school production pull off Audrey II, the boisterous and rather hungry plant?

Four plants, or puppets, are used to portray Audrey II from an infant plant to the monster it becomes.

The audience need not fear a lack of production value in this department.

“The challenge with the plants is doing the puppeteering,” Lehostky said. “Someone is actually sitting in there, they use their legs as vines, and they are talking with the actor playing Audrey II.”

It is a sort of symbiotic acting between the puppeteer and the actor playing the voice of Audrey II.

“It’s fun for us to do, it’s fun to build technically, it’s fun to act out on stage, and it’s the most fun for the audience,” Lehotsky said.

“It’s one of those shows you really can laugh and really can get into, as opposed to other shows where you’re watching the story unfold.

“You’re a part of the story in this one,” he said.

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